Stress Reactivity among African American Breast Cancer Survivors Save

Date Added
October 19th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00060958
Researcher
Chanita Hughes-halbert

List of Studies


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Keywords
Cancer/Breast, Inflammation, Minorities
Summary

Outcomes following a breast cancer diagnosis are different by race and ethnicity with African American women having poorer survival compared to Caucasian women. Research has shown that differences in personal health factors can contribute to breast cancer outcomes and explain racial differences. This study will examine how personal-level factors relating to biological, psychological, and physiological issues play a role in outcomes among African American breast cancer survivors.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Melanie Jefferson
843-876-2430
sweatma@musc.edu

The Association between Arterial Stiffness and Cognitive Impairment Risk in non-stroke controls (TAASCIR) Save

Date Added
February 26th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00074521
Researcher
Joy Jones buie

List of Studies

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Keywords
Brain, Cardiovascular, Hypertension/ High Blood Pressure, Minorities, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The purpose of this research study is to understand the association between heart and brain health in a population of 40-75 year olds. In this study, we will work to better understand blood vessel stiffness and brain function in African American and non-Hispanic white individuals. You will be asked to give blood during the study visit. Additional information will be obtained to help the researcher better understand the blood vessel and brain function data collected. There is only one study visit that last roughly 2 hours and compensation will be available.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Joy Jones Buie
8437926098
jonejn@musc.edu

Identifying Barriers to Timely and Equitable Adjuvant Therapy Following Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer Save

Date Added
November 2nd, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00070798
Researcher
Evan Graboyes

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Keywords
Cancer/Head & Neck, Minorities, Throat
Summary

Delays in starting radiation after surgery for head and neck cancer disproportionately affect minorities and those of low socioeconomic status, causing increased mortality. The barriers that prevent the delivery of timely, equitable postoperative radiation remain unknown. This study seeks to identify the barriers to timely, equitable postoperative radiation following surgery for head and neck cancer.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Evan Graboyes
843-792-0719
graboyes@musc.edu

Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Trial RandOmizing Heparin Save

Date Added
September 26th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00051279
Researcher
Alejandro Spiotta

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Adolescents, Brain, Drug Studies, Men's Health, Minorities, Obesity, Pain, Stroke, Women's Health
Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine if giving the medicine "heparin" intravenously (through the veins) continuously for up to 14 days to subjects after a brain aneurysm has burst will help improve the chances of subjects having a good recovery after the bleed compared to subjects who get routine brain aneurysm care (standard of care). Patients who get routine care would also get heparin, but they would typically get an overall lower dose and the heparin would be injected under the skin (heparin shot) instead of in the veins.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Amora Mayo-Perez
843-792-1737
mayoaper@musc.edu

Neural Determinants of Age-Related Change in Auditory-Visual Speech Processing Save

Date Added
September 24th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00070971
Researcher
James Dias

List of Studies

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Keywords
Aging, Brain, Central Nervous System, Ears, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Hearing, Language, Minorities, Vision/ Eye
Summary

Older adults typically have trouble identifying the speech they hear, especially in noisy environments. Fortunately, compared to younger adults, older adults are better able to compensate for difficulties identifying the speech they hear by recruiting the visual system. However, the extent to which older adults can benefit from visual input, and how this influence relates to age-related changes in brain structure and function, have not been thoroughly investigated. The general purpose of this study is to determine how age-related changes in brain structure and function affect how well people hear and see. This study seeks participants with normal hearing to mild hearing loss, who also have normal or corrected-to-normal vision.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
James Dias
(843) 792-3921
diasj@musc.edu

Community-based intervention under nurse guidance after stroke (CINGS) phase 1 and 2 formative investigation Save

Date Added
September 2nd, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00045745
Researcher
Gayenell Magwood

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Cardiovascular, Minorities, Stroke
Summary

This research which encompasses a relatively new area of study that uses the Ecological Model to frame investigation is significant because it will help: (a) understand how patient, family, and community level factors impact stroke recovery and account for disparities in post stroke recovery between AA and Whites; (b) engage community members (AA, Health Provider, Families) and (c) integrate this knowledge and the interplay of socio-environmental and behavioral factors so as to develop a multi-level community based intervention with community dwelling AA in the acute post-stroke recovery period. In this model of care, the nurse guides the CHW in evidence-based interventions and the CHW links with community members to deliver the interventions to individuals. It uses nurse teleHealth guidance of the CHW and home based CHW-patient training in self-management. Together they work to disseminate and integrate the successful interventions into health and community systems. These activities will complement and build upon the growing literature related to environment guided lifestyle and self -management programs and will lead to effective socio-culturally tailored stroke recovery interventions that improve long term outcomes by directly addressing factors associated with existing disparities in recovery.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Gayenell Magwood
8437920685
magwoodg@musc.edu

Improving Resection Rates among African Americans with NSCLC ("Southern Lung Cancer Study") Save

Date Added
May 13th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00042975
Researcher
Marvella Ford

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Cancer, Cancer/Lung, Minorities, Stage I, Stage II, Surgery
Summary

The goal of this study is to improve rates of lung-directed therapy with curative intent (LDTCI) among African Americans with probable or proven early stage non-small cell lung cancer via a patient navigation intervention. Study participants will be recruited from study sites across the southern US, including the Medical University of South Carolina Hollings Cancer Center (MUSC HCC) and the Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest NCORP Research Base (WF NCORP RB) and its affiliated sites. Participants will be randomized by study site. This study does not include blood draws or therapeutic interventions. During the one-year follow-up period, each participant will complete 5 telephone surveys.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Kendrea Knight
843-876-2452
knightkd@musc.edu

Gene Discoveries in Subjects with Crohn's Disease of African Descent Save

Date Added
September 2nd, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00034427
Researcher
Jose Quiros

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Bowel, Children's Health, Crohn's Disease, Digestive System, Ethnicity and Disease, Genetics, Minorities, Pediatrics
Summary

A minimum of 1000 AA subjects with IBD will be recruited in the 4 year period; from Emory, Grady and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. And a total of 2500 patients form the collaborating institutions.

The primary investigative design will be a paired case-control study. This study will be similar to other IRB approved protocols in which DNA, serum, are collected from children and adults with and without IBD for the purpose of genotype analysis.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Mohammed Al Gadban
843-792-4837
algadban@musc.edu

Racial Disparities in Sepsis: The Role of Immunological Heterogeneity Save

Date Added
June 18th, 2013
PRO Number
Pro00025452
Researcher
Andrew Goodwin

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Ethnicity and Disease, Genetics, Inflammation, Minorities
Summary

Disparities in sepsis incidence and outcomes have been identified between blacks and whites. While some of these disparities can likely be attributed to socio-demographic factors including socio-economic status, education level, and access to healthcare, existing data suggests that other factors, including biological differences, may contribute to the observed disparities. The innate immune system is an integral component of the body's mechanism for fighting off infection and has been identified as a site for numerous racial heterogeneities. The RADIUS study seeks to identify both black and white patients admitted in an intensive care unit with sepsis. A single blood sample will be collected from each enrolled subject to be used for quantitative analysis of cytokine levels as well as for genotyping for a specific single nucleotide polymoprhism. These cytokines and the polymorphism are related to the innate immune system response to infection. Simultaneously, clinical and demographic information will be recorded from each enrolled subject so that cytokine levels and polymorphism presence can be correlated with clinical outcomes while controlling for socio-demographic variables.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Ashley Warden
843-792-4349
jonesash@musc.edu

The Core Center for Clinical Research, Improving Minority Health in Rheumatic Diseases Save

Date Added
January 15th, 2013
PRO Number
Pro00021985
Researcher
Gary Gilkeson

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Autoimmune disease, Environmental Factors, Ethnicity and Disease, Genetics, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Lupus, Minorities, Rare Diseases, Scleroderma
Summary

Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus; SLE) and Systemic Sclerosis (scleroderma; SSc) are relatively rare rheumatic diseases that disproportionately impact the African American community, and particularly African American women. The causes of lupus and scleroderma are unknown, but thought to include both genetic and environmental factors. We are enrolling lupus and scleroderma patients, and healthy control subjects. This is not a drug study. The purpose of this study is to better understand the factors that predispose people to develop lupus and scleroderma. Information about medical, social and family history, medications, physical exam findings, and laboratory tests will be collected for analysis. This study will involve approximately 1360 volunteers.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Daniel Melcher
843-792-2509
melcher@musc.edu

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