Unilateral Spatial Neglect and Postural Control Deficits in Children with Unilateral Brain Damage

Date Added
June 7th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00107818
Researcher
Emerson Hart

List of Studies

Keywords
Brain, Cerebral Palsey, Pediatrics, Stroke
Summary

Children with injury to one side of the brain (stroke, cerebral palsy, or traumatic brain injury) often have difficulty with many life activities due to problems with their ability to pay attention and also problems with keeping their balance. This project will help explain how a child's problems with paying attention impacts their ability to keep themselves safe while standing and moving during childhood life activities. This study will have children participate in a several different assessments to evaluate how they are paying attention, how well they keep their balance, how well they are able to move and play, and will ask parents to complete a couple of surveys to provide information about what the children are like at home. This study will consist of one visit to MUSC campus that will take about 2 hours to complete the testing.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Emerson Hart
843-792-1671
hartem@musc.edu

Improving the Collaborative Health of Minority COVID-19 Survivor and Carepartner Dyads Through Interventions Targeting Social and Structural Health Inequities.

Date Added
May 6th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00110062
Researcher
Gayenell Magwood

List of Studies


Keywords
Cardiovascular, Coronavirus, Diabetes, Hypertension/ High Blood Pressure, Minorities, Stroke
Summary

Underserved, racial and ethnic minority communities are experiencing higher rates of COVID-19 cases and associated mortality compared to whites due to long standing social and structural inequities that also drive disparities in chronic diseases such as stroke, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hypertension. Patients with underlying chronic diseases who are recovering from COVID-19 depend on the support of family and friends (informal caregivers/care partners) who are being exposed to the same pandemic and racial stressors, exposure that can affect the health and quality of life of both partners. The primary goal of this study is to test the efficacy of an adapted, telehealth-enhanced intervention that targets barriers impacting family illness management behaviors of Black/African American (AA) adult COVID-19 survivors and carepartner dyads for improved quality of life and COVID/chronic illness health related outcomes.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Gayenell Magwood
8437920685
magwoodg@musc.edu

Impact of Intense Physical Therapy on Functional Mobility Outcomes in the Acute Stroke Population (<24 hours post-stroke)

Date Added
April 20th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00108635
Researcher
Christine Holmstedt

List of Studies


Keywords
Physical Therapy, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

We propose to enroll 150 individuals with acute stroke admitted to MUSC over the next 12 months and randomize them into increased frequency and usual care PT treatment groups. This study will be designed as a randomized control trial. Patients who agree to participate, will be assigned (at random) to either a treatment group which will receive more frequent intensive therapy services or to the control group (treatment as usual) which will receive the standard amount of therapy services currently provided in the hospital setting (~3-5 times per week). By studying the balance, walking and success of patients in the treatment group compared with the standard of care group- we hope to better understand the effect of more frequent physical therapy services on a patient's independence post stroke.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Christine Holmstedt
843-792-3020
holmsted@musc.edu

Development of a System to Track Upper Extremity Task Practice at Home for Stroke Survivors

Date Added
March 31st, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00107753
Researcher
Na Jin Seo

List of Studies


Keywords
Movement Disorders, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Hand and arm disability after stroke has a profound, negative impact on functional ability and independence. Basic science research suggests that recovery requires high repetitions of task-specific practice. Enough practice cannot be completed during therapy sessions, requiring patients to perform additional task practices at home on their own. Adherence to these home task practices is often limited and is likely a factor reducing the effectiveness of rehabilitation post-stroke. This project will create a system to objectively track stroke survivors' hand and arm task practice at home. The quantity and quality feedback from the system is expected to optimize effective task practice at home by patients. The system is expected to also enable adherence- and progress-driven clinic visits to maximize efficiency of therapy service.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Gabrielle Scronce
919 451 1753
scronce@musc.edu

Telerehabilitation for Aphasia

Date Added
March 1st, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00105880
Researcher
Leonardo Bonilha

List of Studies


Keywords
Speech Disorders, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

To assess comparable efficacy of aphasia therapy administered via telerehab (aphasia remote therapy; ART) to aphasia therapy administered in clinic (in-clinic therapy; I-CT).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Skyler Fontenot
843-792-4088
fontenos@musc.edu

Escitalopram & Language Intervention for Subacute Aphasia

Date Added
February 8th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00105179
Researcher
Leonardo Bonilha

List of Studies


Keywords
Language, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

This research is being done to help us understand whether and how the use of a drug, called escitalopram (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor or SSRI), may improve language therapy effectiveness, as measured when naming untrained pictures and describing pictures, in individuals with aphasia within three months after a stroke.

Another goal of part of this study is to investigate the particular concentration of certain molecules in the brain of people with following a stroke and how the SSRI might change this. This will allow us to better understand how brains change in people receiving language therapy.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Skyler Fontenot
843-792-0189
fontenos@musc.edu

Priming the rehabilitation engine: aerobic exercise as the fuel to spark behavioral improvements in stroke

Date Added
February 2nd, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00105988
Researcher
Ryan Ross

List of Studies

Keywords
Exercise, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke is a leading cause of disability in the U.S. and many Veteran stroke survivors live with severe disability. Despite recent advances in rehabilitation treatments many stroke survivors have persistent physical and mental difficulties such as reduced arm and leg function, difficulty thinking, and depression.
Developing treatments that address these problems is necessary to improve long-term recovery for stroke survivors. Aerobic exercise (AEx) can improve physical and mental function, and reduce depression. Additionally, AEx may enhance physical rehabilitation by making the brain more receptive to, and consequently improving the response to a rehabilitation treatment. Therefore, combining AEx with physical rehabilitation has the potential to improve multiple parts of stroke recovery. This study will examine the effect of combining AEx with physical rehabilitation on physical and mental function in stroke survivors. By gaining a better understanding of the effects of this combined intervention we aim to advance the rehabilitative care of Veteran stroke survivors.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Ryan Ross
843-792-3477
rossre@musc.edu

The TESLA Trial: Thrombectomy for Emergent Salvage of Large Anterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke

Date Added
September 8th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00101852
Researcher
Sami Al Kasab

List of Studies


Keywords
Stroke
Summary

TESLA is a multicenter trial in which patients with moderate-large acute ischemic stroke infarcts will be assigned to either best medical management alone (including intravenous recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV rtPA)) or intra-arterial treatment (IAT) with mechanical thrombectomy added to best medical management.

Mechanical thrombectomy will be performed with FDA-approved thrombectomy devices in accordance with the instructions for use (IFU) and under FDA Investigational Device Exemption G190006. Patients will be enrolled at up to 35 U.S. centers and 5 European centers over an anticipated three-year period, with an additional year for trial closeout.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Vicki Streets
843-792-8606
streetsv@musc.edu

Proactive and reactive perturbation training to reduce falls and improve gait stability in people with chronic stroke

Date Added
August 4th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00101810
Researcher
Jesse Dean

List of Studies


Keywords
Stroke
Summary

Following a stroke, many individuals have a high risk of falls, which can negatively influence quality of life. Unfortunately, current treatments have not effectively addressed this problem. This study investigates whether two methods of delivering mechanical perturbations during walking have the potential to improve post-stroke walking balance and reduce real-world fall incidence.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Alyssa Hydar
843-792-8171
hydar@musc.edu

INTEGRATION OF mHEALTH INTO THE CARE OF PATIENTS WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE TO INCREASE HYDROXYUREA UTILIZATION – mESH study

Date Added
July 23rd, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00097832
Researcher
Cathy Melvin

List of Studies


Keywords
Blood Disorders, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The purpose of this research project is to evaluate the effectiveness of a mobile health (mHealth) application in improving adherence to hydroxyurea therapy in patients with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). Participants will be asked to install an application on their phone that will remind them to take their medication regularly. It notifies the participants when it is time to request a refill, it tracks their hydroxyurea use, and it gives them information on their medication. It also has resources that could be helpful for the ongoing care of their sickle cell disease. This is a 24-week project with 3 study visits. The first study visit will be at the beginning of the study period (enrollment or baseline visit), the second will be at approximately 12 weeks, and the third is at the end of the 24 weeks. At each visit, participants will complete a survey, share with us their experience with the application, and share with us where they refilled their medications. Some participants will also be asked to complete an interview at the end of their final study visit. Patient participants will receive a $25 Walmart Gift card at each of visits (including an additional $25 gift card for the optional interview) for their participation.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Sarah Bourne
8433452545
bourne@musc.edu



-- OR --