Combining taVNS with early CIMT to improve health outcomes of infants

Date Added
May 4th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00109558
Researcher
Dorothea Jenkins

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Infant, Movement Disorders, Physical Therapy, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Newborns who are born premature or suffer brain injury at birth are at risk for motor problems that may cause weakness in reaching and grasping on one side of the body. In older children, therapists may use a hand mitt and restraint for the stronger arm, to encourage use of the weaker side, called constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT). Even with the high intensity therapy of CIMT, it typically takes between 40-120 hours total treatment time for most children to improve their motor skills. A non-invasive form of nerve stimulation, transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (taVNS), stimulates a nerve by the ear that enhances learning motor skills. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of taVNS to improve motor skills when paired with CIMT in infants with one-sided weakness at 6-18months of age.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Patricia Coker-Bolt
843-792-7491
coerkpc@musc.edu

Impact of Intense Physical Therapy on Functional Mobility Outcomes in the Acute Stroke Population (<24 hours post-stroke)

Date Added
April 20th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00108635
Researcher
Christine Holmstedt

List of Studies


Keywords
Physical Therapy, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

We propose to enroll 150 individuals with acute stroke admitted to MUSC over the next 12 months and randomize them into increased frequency and usual care PT treatment groups. This study will be designed as a randomized control trial. Patients who agree to participate, will be assigned (at random) to either a treatment group which will receive more frequent intensive therapy services or to the control group (treatment as usual) which will receive the standard amount of therapy services currently provided in the hospital setting (~3-5 times per week). By studying the balance, walking and success of patients in the treatment group compared with the standard of care group- we hope to better understand the effect of more frequent physical therapy services on a patient's independence post stroke.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Christine Holmstedt
843-792-3020
holmsted@musc.edu

Neurophysiological characterization of dry needling in people with spasticity due to stroke

Date Added
March 3rd, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00095077
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies


Keywords
Central Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The study team is recruiting 20 adults with spasticity due to chronic stroke and 20 adults with no neurological injuries for a 2 day study. In people with chronic stroke, one of the most common and disabling problems is spasticity (increased muscle tone or muscle stiffness). The purpose of this research study is to examine effects of dry needling on the nervous system (pathways between the muscle, spinal cord, and brain) in people with spasticity due to chronic stroke. Dry needling is a procedure in which a thin, stainless steel needle is inserted into your skin to produce a muscle twitch response. It is intended to release a knot in your muscle and relieve pain.

The total study duration is 2 days. The first visit will take about 3 hours, during which dry needling will take place, and the second visit will take about 1 hour. During both visits you will be asked to participate in examinations of reflexes (muscle responses to non-invasive nerve stimulation) and arm/leg function.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Concomitant sensory stimulation during therapy to enhance hand functional recovery post stroke

Date Added
August 6th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00090790
Researcher
Na Jin Seo

List of Studies


Keywords
Aging, Exercise, Movement Disorders, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Hand disability after stroke has a profound negative impact on functional ability and independence. Hand therapy may be augmented with sensory stimulation for better outcomes. We have developed a novel sensory stimulation - unfelt vibration applied via a wristwatch. In this study, we will determine if combining this stimulation with hand task practice is superior to hand task practice alone.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Na Jin Seo
8437920084
seon@musc.edu

Novel training environment to normalize altered finger force direction post stroke

Date Added
June 6th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00088988
Researcher
Na Jin Seo

List of Studies


Keywords
Exercise, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine if 3-dimensional finger force training is an effective tool in restoring hand function post stroke. Persons who survived a stroke 3 to 12 months ago and have a hand impairment will be eligible to participate in this study. Participants will be asked to come to the laboratory to practice controlling the finger force generation 3 times a week for 6 weeks. Participants will see their performance on a computer screen. Participants will also come to the laboratory for additional 4-7 visits for assessments of their upper extremity function. The total duration of the study will be 2.5 months.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Na Jin Seo
8437920084
seon@musc.edu

Measurement of gait mechanics and movement in the lower extremity amputee

Date Added
October 30th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00082064
Researcher
Aaron Embry

List of Studies

Keywords
Exercise, Movement Disorders, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies
Summary

Walking after a lower extremity amputation is often difficult. It is important that researchers and clinicians understand the mechanisms that inhibit normal walking function. In this study, we are recruiting individuals with lower extremity limb loss for a walking and balance investigation. We will also be studying matched healthy controls to do similar study procedures. All study procedures will occur on the campus of MUSC by a licensed Physical Therapist and experienced researcher. Any questions should be directed to the coordinator listed.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aaron Embry
843-792-8198
embry@musc.edu

Incline Training to Personalize Motor Control Interventions after Stroke

Date Added
May 3rd, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00077797
Researcher
Mark Bowden

List of Studies


Keywords
Exercise, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke is the leading cause of disability, as many of those affected demonstrate difficulty with movement and
walking. Rehabilitation post-stroke can be challenging and often ineffective because no two stroke survivors
present with the same mobility impairments, yet the same physical therapy interventions are utilized. Thus, a need exists to personalize rehabilitation techniques to improve function and mobility post-stroke. The proposed innovative research will test a framework created to identify the most effective intervention based on a participant's specific motor control problems. We plan to study how self-selected walking speed is impacted by a four-week walking program that incorporates either walking on an inclined or declined treadmill compared to walking on a flat treadmill. We will determine the best intervention for each problem and identify predictors of response. Selecting the correct intervention for personalized motor control problems, as opposed to applying a one-size-fits-all strategy for rehabilitation, is likely to improve walking function in Veterans after stroke.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brian Cence
(843) 792-2668
cence@musc.edu

Assessment of Contributions to Impaired Walking after Neurologic Injury

Date Added
January 15th, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00028941
Researcher
Mark Bowden

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Muscle, Nerve, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

Rehabilitation interventions including resistance training, functional and task-specific therapy, and gait or locomotor training have been shown to be successful in improving motor function in individuals with neurologic disease or injury. Recent investigations conducted in our laboratory indicate that intense resistance training coupled with task-specific functional training lead to significant gains in functional motor recovery. Similarly, gait rehabilitation involving intense treadmill training and/or task-specific locomotor training has been shown to be effective in improving locomotor ability. However, the underlying neural adaptations associated with these therapeutic approaches are not well understood. Our primary goal is to understand the motor control underpinnings of neurologic rehabilitation in order to apply this knowledge to future generations of therapeutic interventions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brian Cence
843-792-2668
cence@musc.edu



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