PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF ACUTE FLACCID MYELITIS (AFM) TO DEFINE NATURAL HISTORY, RISK FACTORS, AND PATHOGENETIC MECHANISMS

Date Added
December 11th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00094024
Researcher
Sandra Fowler

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Infectious Diseases, Nerve, Nervous System, Spinal Cord
Summary

This study is designed to gain a better understanding and natural history of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM).

This study will include reviewing medical records to record information about the medications taken to treat AFM and your social history (smoking, alcohol and drug use). The results of lab tests, imaging studies and tests will also be collected to determine if you have any damage to your nerves that are done by your clinical care team to diagnose your AFM.

Samples from Mouth, nose, stool and blood will be collected as a part of this study. Any remaining spinal fluid that is in the lab from the spinal tap from clinical labs will also be collected. A neurological exam and tests to determine issues with muscles, functionality and strength after being diagnosed with AFM will also be performed as a part of this study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Sandra Fowler
8437922385
fowlersl@musc.edu

Neuromodulation of motor and sensory spinal pathways in subjects undergoing epidural spinal cord stimulation.

Date Added
October 15th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00089881
Researcher
Nathan Rowland

List of Studies


Keywords
Central Nervous System, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Pain, Spinal Cord
Summary

Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy is currently used to treat the symptoms of chronic pain. Studying the effect of SCS during muscle testing, proprioception testing and multiple gait analysis, we expect to gain understanding of exactly how SCS influences motor and sensory pathways of the spinal cord. We expect this approach to broaden our understanding in the application of SCS in the chronic pain conditions, and may lead to therapeutic advances in other populations, for example, patients with spinal cord injury.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Taylor Mayberry
5024423087
mayberrt@musc.edu

Neuroplasticity Associated with Extended Daily Use of a Sensorimotor Priming Vibration System to Improve Hand Function After Stroke

Date Added
March 5th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00086207
Researcher
Na Jin Seo

List of Studies


Keywords
Aging, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The objective is to determine if continuous use of TheraBracelet in the home has a clinically meaningful effect in chronic stroke survivors. The study design is a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. We will enroll 40 chronic stroke survivors with moderate hand impairment. Subjects will be randomly assigned to the treatment or control group (n=20 per group). All subjects will wear the TheraBracelet device on the paretic wrist for 8 hours/day every day during their normal daily activity for 1 month. The device will deliver vibration (treatment) or no vibration (control). Double-blinding is possible because the treatment vibration is imperceptible (i.e., subthreshold). Measures of neural plasticity, the amount of the paretic arm use in daily living, clinical hand function, biomechanical grip control, and self-reported abilities for activities of daily living will be assessed at baseline, once a week during the month of wearing the device, and for 3-month follow-up, allowing determination of the efficacy and persistence.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Amanda Vatinno
843-792-8970
vatinno@musc.edu

Direct measurement of motor cortical responses to transcranial direct current stimulation

Date Added
May 15th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00073545
Researcher
Nathan Rowland

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Parkinsons, Surgery
Summary

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has shown the potential to improve symptoms in patients with motor deficits, however its effects have not been consistent in randomized studies to date, limiting widespread adoption of this technology. A critical gap in our knowledge is a detailed understanding of how tDCS affects motor areas in the brain. We propose using tDCS while recording directly from motor cortex using subdural electrocorticography (sECoG) in patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery. We expect this novel approach to broaden our understanding of tDCS application and possibly lead to therapeutic advances in this population.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Ayesha Vohra
843-792-6210
vohra@musc.edu

Motor Cortical Control of Plantarflexors and Dorsiflexors after Stroke

Date Added
June 3rd, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00034009
Researcher
Mark Bowden

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Nerve, Stroke
Summary

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is often used to assess the excitability of the brain and the connectivity between the brain and peripheral muscles. However, less work has been completed with the portion of the brain controlling leg muscles. In addition, there appears to be more error and less reliability in these measures in those with stroke. This project aims to assess a battery of TMS-derived outcome measures to determine the most effective for those after stroke. This information is of critical importance as we use this technology to assess changes after rehabilitation post stroke and to understand the motor control of walking after neurologic injury.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brian Cence
843-792-2668
cence@musc.edu

Assessment of Contributions to Impaired Walking after Neurologic Injury

Date Added
January 15th, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00028941
Researcher
Mark Bowden

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Muscle, Nerve, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

Rehabilitation interventions including resistance training, functional and task-specific therapy, and gait or locomotor training have been shown to be successful in improving motor function in individuals with neurologic disease or injury. Recent investigations conducted in our laboratory indicate that intense resistance training coupled with task-specific functional training lead to significant gains in functional motor recovery. Similarly, gait rehabilitation involving intense treadmill training and/or task-specific locomotor training has been shown to be effective in improving locomotor ability. However, the underlying neural adaptations associated with these therapeutic approaches are not well understood. Our primary goal is to understand the motor control underpinnings of neurologic rehabilitation in order to apply this knowledge to future generations of therapeutic interventions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brian Cence
843-792-2668
cence@musc.edu



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