A Phase II Study of Metronomic and Targeted Anti-Angiogenesis Therapy for Children With Recurrent/Progressive Medulloblastoma

Date Added
September 1st, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00091939
Researcher
Jacqueline Kraveka

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Brain Tumor, Cancer, Central Nervous System, Children's Health, Drug Studies, Pediatrics, Spinal Cord
Summary

This study is for patients with recurrent/progressive medulloblastoma, which is a type of childhood brain tumor. Participants in this study will receive intravenous (IV, into the veins) bevacizumab and intrathecal (into the spinal fluid) or intraventricular (into the fluid surrounding the brain) etoposide and cytarabine in combination with five oral (taken by mouth) chemotherapy drugs as a possible treatment for recurrent/progressive medulloblastoma. Total study duration is about 1 year and depending on how well a participant tolerates the medications and the response of the disease, the patient may continue the treatment after the first year.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
HCC Clinical Trials Office
843-792-9321
hcc-clinical-trails@musc.edu

Operant Conditioning of Spinal Reflexes to Enhance Motor Function Recovery after Spinal Cord injury

Date Added
April 7th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00095583
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies


Keywords
Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

The purpose of the first portion of this study is to gather feedback from clinicians on the usability of the current system and procedure, so the researchers can make reflex training more useful and usable for improving recovery after spinal cord injury or other nervous system injuries and diseases. The researchers are recruiting 20 therapists who have been actively practicing physical medicine and 30 adults with no known neurological conditions to test system usability and the reflex operant conditioning protocol. For this portion of the study, there are 5 visits.

The purpose of the second part of the study is to validate the capacity of the system to change the size of the targeted reflex. For this the researchers are recruiting 25 individuals with chronic incomplete SCI who have spasticity in the leg to participate in the reflex training procedure. The study involves approximately 45 visits with a total study duration of about 6 months.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Neurophysiological characterization of dry needling in people with spasticity due to stroke

Date Added
March 3rd, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00095077
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies


Keywords
Central Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The study team is recruiting 20 adults with spasticity due to chronic stroke and 20 adults with no neurological injuries for a 2 day study. In people with chronic stroke, one of the most common and disabling problems is spasticity (increased muscle tone or muscle stiffness). The purpose of this research study is to examine effects of dry needling on the nervous system (pathways between the muscle, spinal cord, and brain) in people with spasticity due to chronic stroke. Dry needling is a procedure in which a thin, stainless steel needle is inserted into your skin to produce a muscle twitch response. It is intended to release a knot in your muscle and relieve pain.

The total study duration is 2 days. The first visit will take about 3 hours, during which dry needling will take place, and the second visit will take about 1 hour. During both visits you will be asked to participate in examinations of reflexes (muscle responses to non-invasive nerve stimulation) and arm/leg function.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Depression and Attentional Bias

Date Added
January 29th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00087075
Researcher
Jared Woodward

List of Studies

Keywords
Brain, Central Nervous System, Depression, Psychiatry
Summary

The purpose of this research study is to determine if there is a difference in the way that people pay attention to their surroundings when they are depressed. This can be tested by using a line bisection test, where people with and without depression are asked to divide a line in half. We have hypothesized that people with depression, who are more self-reflective, will demonstrate a downward preference when they perform the line bisection test compared to people without depression.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jared Woodward
843-697-5638
woodwarj@musc.edu

Characterization of physiological changes induced through motor-evoked potential conditioning in people with spinal cord injury

Date Added
December 3rd, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00091457
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies


Keywords
Central Nervous System, Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

We are currently recruiting volunteers who are interested in participating in a brain-spinal cord-muscle response training study that aims to better understand the changes that take place in the nervous system as a result of this type of training. After spinal cord injury, brain-to-muscle connections are often interrupted. Because these connections are important in movement control, when they are not working well, movements may be disturbed. Researchers have found that people can learn to strengthen these connections through training. Strengthening these connections may be able to improve movement control and recovery after injuries.

Research participants will be asked to stand, sit, and walk during the study sessions. Electrodes are placed on the skin over leg muscles for monitoring muscle activity. For examining brain-to-muscle connections, we use transcranial magnetic stimulation. The stimulation is applied over the head and will indirectly stimulate brain cells with little or no discomfort.

Participation in this study requires approximately three sessions per week for four months, followed by two to three sessions over another three months. Each session lasts approximately 1 hour. Participants will receive a mileage reimbursement.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Neuromodulation of motor and sensory spinal pathways in subjects undergoing epidural spinal cord stimulation.

Date Added
October 15th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00089881
Researcher
Nathan Rowland

List of Studies


Keywords
Central Nervous System, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Pain, Spinal Cord
Summary

Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy is currently used to treat the symptoms of chronic pain. Studying the effect of SCS during muscle testing, proprioception testing and multiple gait analysis, we expect to gain understanding of exactly how SCS influences motor and sensory pathways of the spinal cord. We expect this approach to broaden our understanding in the application of SCS in the chronic pain conditions, and may lead to therapeutic advances in other populations, for example, patients with spinal cord injury.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Taylor Mayberry
5024423087
mayberrt@musc.edu

Neuroplasticity Associated with Extended Daily Use of a Sensorimotor Priming Vibration System to Improve Hand Function After Stroke

Date Added
March 5th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00086207
Researcher
Na Jin Seo

List of Studies


Keywords
Aging, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The objective is to determine if continuous use of TheraBracelet in the home has a clinically meaningful effect in chronic stroke survivors. The study design is a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. We will enroll 40 chronic stroke survivors with moderate hand impairment. Subjects will be randomly assigned to the treatment or control group (n=20 per group). All subjects will wear the TheraBracelet device on the paretic wrist for 8 hours/day every day during their normal daily activity for 1 month. The device will deliver vibration (treatment) or no vibration (control). Double-blinding is possible because the treatment vibration is imperceptible (i.e., subthreshold). Measures of neural plasticity, the amount of the paretic arm use in daily living, clinical hand function, biomechanical grip control, and self-reported abilities for activities of daily living will be assessed at baseline, once a week during the month of wearing the device, and for 3-month follow-up, allowing determination of the efficacy and persistence.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Amanda Vatinno
843-792-8970
vatinno@musc.edu

Title: Rapid Reversal of CNS-Depressant Drug Effect prior to Brain Death Determination Investigators: Sameh Hanna, MD, Justin Atwood, MD Institution: Palmetto Health-University of South Carolina Medical Group, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Columbia, SC

Date Added
December 11th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00077995
Researcher
Sameh Hanna

List of Studies

Keywords
Brain, Central Nervous System, Nervous System
Summary

Prospective trial with enrollment of 30 patients in various intensive care units at Palmetto Health Richland from January 1st 2019 to June 30th 2020. If patients had undergone targeted temperature management (33-36 degrees Celsius for 24 hours via intravascular or surface control methods, with or without sedation or neuromuscular blockade, followed by rewarming actively or passively at 0.25-0.5 degrees per hour over 8-12 hours to 37 degrees) investigators will wait 24 hours after rewarming prior to testing. End point is to evaluate if pharmacological reversal agents would result in improved GCS scores or return of cerebral or brainstem functions in some comatose patients, which will be considered a positive test result.

Institution
Palmetto
Recruitment Contact
Sameh Hanna
8643443439
sameh.hanna@palmettohealth.org

Odor Disturbances: Clinical Care Registry

Date Added
September 26th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00080333
Researcher
Thomas Uhde

List of Studies


Keywords
ADD/ADHD, Adolescents, Aging, Allergy, Alzheimers, Anxiety, Asthma, Autism, Autoimmune disease, Central Nervous System, Chronic Fatigue, Depression, Environmental Factors, Fibromyalgia, Inflammation, Memory Loss, Nervous System, Parkinsons, Psychiatry
Summary

Candidates for this study may or may not report disturbances in odor perception as their primary reason for seeking treatment at MUSC. This study is designed to collect long term, observational data from patients who are being treated with routine clinical care in health clinics at MUSC. Data from clinical questionnaires will be de-identified and stored in a database.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Richard Simmons
843-792-7439
simmr@musc.edu

Direct measurement of motor cortical responses to transcranial direct current stimulation

Date Added
May 15th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00073545
Researcher
Nathan Rowland

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Parkinsons, Surgery
Summary

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has shown the potential to improve symptoms in patients with motor deficits, however its effects have not been consistent in randomized studies to date, limiting widespread adoption of this technology. A critical gap in our knowledge is a detailed understanding of how tDCS affects motor areas in the brain. We propose using tDCS while recording directly from motor cortex using subdural electrocorticography (sECoG) in patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery. We expect this novel approach to broaden our understanding of tDCS application and possibly lead to therapeutic advances in this population.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Ayesha Vohra
843-792-6210
vohra@musc.edu



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