Sex Differences in the Effects of Early Childhood Adversity on Laboratory-Induced Stress and Craving among Individuals with Opioid Use Disorder

Date Added
February 2nd, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00104087
Researcher
Delisa Brown

List of Studies


Keywords
Drug Studies, Pain, Psychiatry, Stress Disorders, Substance Use
Summary

This study will examine the effects of early childhood adversity on stress and craving among individuals with opioid use disorder. Study participants will complete a total of three visits, including a 1-month follow-up visit. Participants will be asked to complete questionnaires about thier mood, anxiety, drug use, craving and adverse childhood events. They will listen to personalized scripts about a stressful situation, a time when they used opioid and a relaxing situation and their heart rate, skin conductance and cortisol are measured.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Delisa Brown
843-792-2388
browdg@musc.edu

The effect of multi-modal minocycline and N-acetylcysteine for the treatment of fibromyalgia: a double-blind, randomized, crossover pilot study.

Date Added
January 19th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00102425
Researcher
Michael Hillegass

List of Studies


Keywords
Fibromyalgia, Pain
Summary

The purpose of the research is to evaluate the effectiveness of using two common drugs together to reduce chronic pain specifically in patients with fibromyalgia. These two drugs are minocycline and N-acetylcysteine . Minocycline is an antibiotic, and N-acetylcysteine is a supplement that can reduce cell damage. Minocycline and N-acetylcysteine are not FDA approved for chronic pain but have been proven in animal studies to interact with important cells in the body that play a major role in the development of chronic pain.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Wanda Jones
843-792-1869
joneswr@musc.edu

Testing a wearable telemedicine-controllable taVNS device for NeuroCovid Recovery and Rehab

Date Added
September 1st, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00101270
Researcher
Mark George

List of Studies


Keywords
Anxiety, Coronavirus, Depression, Pain
Summary

The purpose of the research is to test out a new form of treatment where we stimulate a nerve in your ear. This is called transcutaneous (through the skin) auricular (ear) vagus nerve stimulation (taVNS) which means that you will receive stimulation through the ear. The taVNS device looks like an ear bud you would use with your smart phone or computer. We are investigating whether or not taVNS can treat neurologic symptoms of COVID-19 which are termed NEUROCOVID. Some symptoms you may experience are new onset anxiety, depression, vertigo, loss of smell, headaches, fatigue, irritability, etc. This study is entirely online and all assessments will be completed virtually.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Sarah Huffman
843 8765141
huffmans@musc.edu

Predictive Chronic Wound Monitor for Healing Assessment via Intelligent Sensor Fusion

Date Added
August 4th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00100687
Researcher
Teresa Kelechi

List of Studies


Keywords
Inflammation, Pain, Skin
Summary

The purpose of this research study is to find out if a wearable bandage with sensors in it and over a chronic wound can accurately tell if a patient's wound is healing or not. Normally, clinician inspection of the wound along with swab cultures are used to assess the healing status of chronic wounds. This study employs artificial intelligence techniques through deep machine learning to look for predictive modeling of wound healing from wound fluid.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Margaret Prentice
843 323-5644
prenticm@musc.edu

Management of Chronic Pain and PTSD in Veterans with tDCS+Prolonged Exposure

Date Added
April 7th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00098148
Researcher
Bethany Wangelin

List of Studies


Keywords
Anxiety, Military, Pain
Summary

This research study looks to combine and test a transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for chronic pain and Prolonged Exposure Therapy (PE) for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Veterans with chronic pain and PTSD.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Stephanie Hart
843-789-6519
zeigls@musc.edu

Topical treatment for superficial disseminated actinic porokeratosis: A Single-Blinded Comparison Between Lovastatin/Cholesterol and Lovastatin

Date Added
April 7th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00096259
Researcher
Dirk Elston

List of Studies


Keywords
Drug Studies, Genetics, Inflammation, Pain, Rare Diseases, Skin
Summary

The purpose of this research is to treat disseminated actinic porokeratosis (DSAP) with cholesterol/lovastatin or lovastatin alone. The goal of treatment is to decrease (DSAP) lesions after 12 weeks of treatment and compare which treatment is best.

The study is single-blinded and randomized, meaning the patients will not be told of which treatment they will receive, and the decision of which treatment they will receive will be completely random. The patient will also agree to close up photographs and clinical photographs taken of their disseminated actinic porokeratosis at the initial visit. At weeks 4, 8, and 12, the patients will complete a virtual visit. The subject will take a picture (phone camera/digital camera) of their lesions/skin markings with a measuring instrument. These photos will be shared with the investigators. Physical exam, photographs, and a review of of the subjects medical records will occur in the study. Changes in size, appearance, and pain will be monitored throughout the study.

The possible benefit of joining this study is that the treatment received may be more effective than the other study treatment or than other available treatments for DSAP, although this cannot be guaranteed.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Alan Snyder
9106195832
snydeala@musc.edu

Treatment of Symptomatic Spondylolysis and Spondylolisthesis

Date Added
March 2nd, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00092708
Researcher
Robert Murphy

List of Studies


Keywords
Pain, Surgery
Summary

Spondylolysis and spondlyolisthesis are rare conditions in children and adolescents. The long term outcomes of treating these patients are unknown. The purpose of this study is understand the symptom relief and quality of life of this patient population.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Robert Murphy
843-792-9542
murphyr@musc.edu

Neuromodulation of motor and sensory spinal pathways in subjects undergoing epidural spinal cord stimulation.

Date Added
October 15th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00089881
Researcher
Nathan Rowland

List of Studies


Keywords
Central Nervous System, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Pain, Spinal Cord
Summary

Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy is currently used to treat the symptoms of chronic pain. Studying the effect of SCS during muscle testing, proprioception testing and multiple gait analysis, we expect to gain understanding of exactly how SCS influences motor and sensory pathways of the spinal cord. We expect this approach to broaden our understanding in the application of SCS in the chronic pain conditions, and may lead to therapeutic advances in other populations, for example, patients with spinal cord injury.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Taylor Mayberry
5024423087
mayberrt@musc.edu

tDCS Combined with a Brief Cognitive Intervention to Reduce Perioperative Pain and Opioid Requirements in Veterans

Date Added
October 1st, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00091450
Researcher
Jeffrey Borckardt

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Joint, Mental Health, Military, Pain, Psychiatry, Surgery
Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine whether a new medical technology can help reduce post-operative total knee or hip pain when combined with a Cognitive-Behavioral intervention (CBI).

This new medical technology, is called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), it uses a very small amount of electricity to temporarily stimulate specific areas of the brain thought to be involved in pain reduction. The electrical current passes through the skin, scalp, hair, and skull and requires no additional medication, sedation, or needles.

This study will investigate the effects of tDCS, the Cognitive-Behavioral (CB) intervention and their combination on pain among veterans following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA). You may benefit in the form of decreased pain and opioid requirements following your knee or hip replacement surgery. However, benefit is only likely if you are randomized to one of the 3 (out of 4) groups.

This study hopes to determine the effects of these interventions and their combined effect on post-operative pain, opioid use and functioning during the 48-hour post-operative period following a total knee or hip replacement.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Georgia Mappin
(843) 789-7104
georgia.mappin@va.gov

Interactions between Patients with Sickle Cell Disease and Providers in the ED: The Feasibility of Measuring Dyadic Concordance of Perceptions

Date Added
August 13th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00089631
Researcher
Aindrea Maddray

List of Studies

Keywords
Pain
Summary

Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is an inherited disease that can cause sudden and severe pain. Pain management involves the use of analgesic medications. Often, providers are reluctant to follow evidence-based guidelines fo analgesic treatment for various reasons and some patients with SCD perceive they are treated differently from other patients. To understand the causes and solutions for this potential discordance, the first step is establishing a way to measure concordance of perceptions within the fast paced Emergency Department (ED) environment. The purpose of this study is to determine the feasibility of developing a process to measure concordance of perceptions between the patient with SCD and their ED provider after an interaction in the ED.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aindrea Maddray
843-834-3572
maddray@musc.edu



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