Targeted spinal cord plasticity for alleviating SCI-related neuropathic pain

Date Added
April 5th, 2022
PRO Number
Pro00118771
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies


Keywords
Central Nervous System, Nerve, Nervous System, Pain, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between reflexes in the leg and the presence of neuropathic pain. The researchers are recruiting 30 individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) total, 15 individuals with neuropathic pain due to SCI and 15 individuals without neuropathic pain. For this portion of the study, there are 2 visits. The first visit will examine cutaneous reflexes in the leg. During the second visit, the study team will assess sensation in the leg and administer questionnaires about pain, functioning, and quality of life.

The purpose of the second part of the study is to examine the effect of reflex training in the leg to decrease neuropathic pain. For this, the researchers are recruiting 15 individuals with neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury to participate in the reflex training procedure. The study involves approximately 50 visits with a total study duration of about 6.5 months (3 months for baseline and training phases followed by 1 month and 3 month follow-up visits).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Relationship Conflict, Psychophysiological Responding, and Heavy Episodic Drinking among Emerging Adults.

Date Added
December 23rd, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00113790
Researcher
Jasara Hogan

List of Studies

Keywords
Alcohol, Nervous System, Women's Health
Summary

Emerging Adulthood is a developmental phase associated with escalating alcohol use and peak levels of Heavy Episodic Drinking (HED). While alcohol misuse is normative at this stage, HED is associated with both short-term (i.e., unprotected sex, alcohol poisoning, sexual assault, etc.) and long-term (i.e., developing alcohol use disorder (AUD), cancer, liver disease, etc.) consequences. The role of peers in EA alcohol use is well established, but research on peer influence tends to assume homogeneity among peer relationships. It is likely, however, that romantic partners play an important and unique part in EA alcohol use above and beyond that of platonic peers. Heart rate variability (HRV), a measure of autonomic nervous system functioning linked to emotion regulation, is a sensitive biomarker of AUD processes such as craving, consumption, and relapse. Although the relevance of HRV to alcohol use has not been frequently studied among dyads or EA, separate literatures suggest that it may be of fundamental importance linking alcohol use and adaptive versus maladaptive conflict in EA. The primary objective of the proposed study is to examine sex differences in the behavioral and physiological mechanisms underlying the relationship between adaptive and maladaptive conflict behaviors and alcohol demand intensity among EA couples.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jasara Hogan
843-792-6068
hoganja@musc.edu

Can increasing motor evoked potential size improve upper extremity motor function in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury?

Date Added
September 7th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00113108
Researcher
Blair Dellenbach

List of Studies

Keywords
Central Nervous System, Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between common clinical assessments and measurements of the function of brain-spinal cord-muscle connections. For examining brain-to-muscle pathways, we use a transcranial magnetic stimulator. This stimulator produces a magnetic field for a very short period of time and indirectly stimulates brain cells with little or no discomfort. We hope that the results of this training study will help us in developing therapy strategies for individuals, better understanding clinical assessments, and understanding treatments that aim to improve function recovery in people with SCI.

There are 2 aims for this study. The purpose of the first is to examine the relationship between assessments commonly used in therapy and doctor's offices (clinical assessments) and measurements of the function of brain-spinal cord- muscle connections. This will require 2 visits, and each visit will last approximately 2 hours.

The purpose of the second aim is to examine the effects of training on brain-spinal cord-muscle response. This will require 30 visits, and each visit will last approximately 1.5 hours.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF ACUTE FLACCID MYELITIS (AFM) TO DEFINE NATURAL HISTORY, RISK FACTORS, AND PATHOGENETIC MECHANISMS

Date Added
December 11th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00094024
Researcher
Sandra Fowler

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Infectious Diseases, Nerve, Nervous System, Spinal Cord
Summary

This study is designed to gain a better understanding and natural history of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM).

This study will include reviewing medical records to record information about the medications taken to treat AFM and your social history (smoking, alcohol and drug use). The results of lab tests, imaging studies and tests will also be collected to determine if you have any damage to your nerves that are done by your clinical care team to diagnose your AFM.

Samples from Mouth, nose, stool and blood will be collected as a part of this study. Any remaining spinal fluid that is in the lab from the spinal tap from clinical labs will also be collected. A neurological exam and tests to determine issues with muscles, functionality and strength after being diagnosed with AFM will also be performed as a part of this study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Sandra Fowler
8437922385
fowlersl@musc.edu

Characterization of physiological changes induced through motor-evoked potential conditioning in people with spinal cord injury

Date Added
December 3rd, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00091457
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies


Keywords
Central Nervous System, Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

We are currently recruiting volunteers who are interested in participating in a brain-spinal cord-muscle response training study that aims to better understand the changes that take place in the nervous system as a result of this type of training. After spinal cord injury, brain-to-muscle connections are often interrupted. Because these connections are important in movement control, when they are not working well, movements may be disturbed. Researchers have found that people can learn to strengthen these connections through training. Strengthening these connections may be able to improve movement control and recovery after injuries.

Research participants will be asked to stand, sit, and walk during the study sessions. Electrodes are placed on the skin over leg muscles for monitoring muscle activity. For examining brain-to-muscle connections, we use transcranial magnetic stimulation. The stimulation is applied over the head and will indirectly stimulate brain cells with little or no discomfort.

Participation in this study requires approximately three sessions per week for four months, followed by two to three sessions over another three months. Each session lasts approximately 1 hour. Participants will receive a mileage reimbursement.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Concomitant sensory stimulation during therapy to enhance hand functional recovery post stroke

Date Added
August 6th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00090790
Researcher
Na Jin Seo

List of Studies


Keywords
Aging, Exercise, Movement Disorders, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Hand disability after stroke has a profound negative impact on functional ability and independence. Hand therapy may be augmented with sensory stimulation for better outcomes. We have developed a novel sensory stimulation - unfelt vibration applied via a wristwatch. In this study, we will determine if combining this stimulation with hand task practice is superior to hand task practice alone.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Na Jin Seo
8437920084
seon@musc.edu

Odor Disturbances: Clinical Care Registry

Date Added
September 26th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00080333
Researcher
Thomas Uhde

List of Studies


Keywords
ADD/ADHD, Adolescents, Aging, Allergy, Alzheimers, Anxiety, Asthma, Autism, Autoimmune disease, Central Nervous System, Chronic Fatigue, Depression, Environmental Factors, Fibromyalgia, Inflammation, Memory Loss, Nervous System, Parkinsons, Psychiatry
Summary

Candidates for this study may or may not report disturbances in odor perception as their primary reason for seeking treatment at MUSC. This study is designed to collect long term, observational data from patients who are being treated with routine clinical care in health clinics at MUSC. Data from clinical questionnaires will be de-identified and stored in a database.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Richard Simmons
843-792-7439
simmr@musc.edu

Direct measurement of motor cortical responses to transcranial direct current stimulation

Date Added
May 15th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00073545
Researcher
Nathan Rowland

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Parkinsons, Surgery
Summary

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has shown the potential to improve symptoms in patients with motor deficits, however its effects have not been consistent in randomized studies to date, limiting widespread adoption of this technology. A critical gap in our knowledge is a detailed understanding of how tDCS affects motor areas in the brain. We propose using tDCS while recording directly from motor cortex using subdural electrocorticography (sECoG) in patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery. We expect this novel approach to broaden our understanding of tDCS application and possibly lead to therapeutic advances in this population.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Ayesha Vohra
843-792-6210
vohra@musc.edu

Operant down-conditioning of the soleus H-reflex in spastic hemiparesis after stroke

Date Added
October 6th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00048307
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies


Keywords
Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

Reflexes are important parts of our movements. When reflexes are not working well, movements are clumsy or even impossible. After stroke, reflex responses may change. Researchers have found that people can learn to increase or decrease a reflex response with training. Recently, we have found that rats and people with partial spinal cord injuries can walk better after they are trained to change a spinal cord reflex. Thus, learning to change a reflex response may help people recover after a nervous system injury. In this study, we aim to examine whether learning to change a spinal reflex through operant conditioning training can improve movement function recovery in people after stroke or other damage to the nervous system.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Operant Conditioning of Spinal Reflexes in Youth

Date Added
August 4th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00046453
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies


Keywords
Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

Reflexes are important parts of our movements. When reflexes are not working well, movements are clumsy or even impossible. Researchers have found that people can learn to increase or decrease a reflex response with training. Recently, we have found that rats with spinal cord injuries can walk better after they are trained to change a spinal cord reflex. Thus, learning to change a reflex response may help people recover after a nervous system injury. We are currently studying effects of spinal cord reflex training (e.g., a knee jerk reflex) in people in early adulthood. We hope that the results of this study will help us develop spinal reflex training as a new treatment to help people in early adulthood recover better after spinal cord injury or other damage to the nervous system.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu



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