Can increasing motor evoked potential size improve upper extremity motor function in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury?

Date Added
September 7th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00113108
Researcher
Blair Dellenbach

List of Studies

Keywords
Central Nervous System, Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between common clinical assessments and measurements of the function of brain-spinal cord-muscle connections. For examining brain-to-muscle pathways, we use a transcranial magnetic stimulator. This stimulator produces a magnetic field for a very short period of time and indirectly stimulates brain cells with little or no discomfort. We hope that the results of this training study will help us in developing therapy strategies for individuals, better understanding clinical assessments, and understanding treatments that aim to improve function recovery in people with SCI.

There are 2 aims for this study. The purpose of the first is to examine the relationship between assessments commonly used in therapy and doctor's offices (clinical assessments) and measurements of the function of brain-spinal cord- muscle connections. This will require 2 visits, and each visit will last approximately 2 hours.

The purpose of the second aim is to examine the effects of training on brain-spinal cord-muscle response. This will require 30 visits, and each visit will last approximately 1.5 hours.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

HEALEY ALS Platform Trial

Date Added
June 23rd, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00099528
Researcher
Amy Chen

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Drug Studies, Nervous System, Rare Diseases
Summary

The HEALEY ALS Platform Trial is a research trial that tests the safety and effectiveness of multiple treatment courses on Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Different courses of treatments may be ongoing at the same time and additional treatment courses may be added to the study as time goes by. Qualified participants will have a 3 in 4 chance of being randomly assigned to an active drug or a 1 in 4 chance of being randomly assigned to an inactive drug. After a treatment course is completed, participants may participate in another treatment course, or if available, continue in an optional extension period of the treatment.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lauren Card
843-729-4394
cardl@musc.edu

Characterization of physiological changes induced through motor-evoked potential conditioning in people with spinal cord injury

Date Added
December 3rd, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00091457
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies


Keywords
Central Nervous System, Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

We are currently recruiting volunteers who are interested in participating in a brain-spinal cord-muscle response training study that aims to better understand the changes that take place in the nervous system as a result of this type of training. After spinal cord injury, brain-to-muscle connections are often interrupted. Because these connections are important in movement control, when they are not working well, movements may be disturbed. Researchers have found that people can learn to strengthen these connections through training. Strengthening these connections may be able to improve movement control and recovery after injuries.

Research participants will be asked to stand, sit, and walk during the study sessions. Electrodes are placed on the skin over leg muscles for monitoring muscle activity. For examining brain-to-muscle connections, we use transcranial magnetic stimulation. The stimulation is applied over the head and will indirectly stimulate brain cells with little or no discomfort.

Participation in this study requires approximately three sessions per week for four months, followed by two to three sessions over another three months. Each session lasts approximately 1 hour. Participants will receive a mileage reimbursement.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Neuromodulation of motor and sensory spinal pathways in subjects undergoing epidural spinal cord stimulation.

Date Added
October 15th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00089881
Researcher
Nathan Rowland

List of Studies


Keywords
Central Nervous System, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Pain, Spinal Cord
Summary

Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy is currently used to treat the symptoms of chronic pain. Studying the effect of SCS during muscle testing, proprioception testing and multiple gait analysis, we expect to gain understanding of exactly how SCS influences motor and sensory pathways of the spinal cord. We expect this approach to broaden our understanding in the application of SCS in the chronic pain conditions, and may lead to therapeutic advances in other populations, for example, patients with spinal cord injury.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Taylor Mayberry
5024423087
mayberrt@musc.edu

Radicava, (Edaravone) Findings in Biomarkers From ALS (REFINE-ALS)

Date Added
September 13th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00089696
Researcher
Amy Chen

List of Studies


Keywords
Nervous System
Summary

Adult patients with ALS that have been recently perscribed Edaravone may qualify to participate in this observational study. Blood and urine samples will be collected to evaluate the effects of Edaravone on ALS and the severity of ALS. During an estimated 12-month period, eligible participants will have approximately 15 clinic visits.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Katrina Madden
843-792-9186
maddenka@musc.edu

Concomitant sensory stimulation during therapy to enhance hand functional recovery post stroke

Date Added
August 6th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00090790
Researcher
Na Jin Seo

List of Studies


Keywords
Aging, Exercise, Movement Disorders, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Hand disability after stroke has a profound negative impact on functional ability and independence. Hand therapy may be augmented with sensory stimulation for better outcomes. We have developed a novel sensory stimulation - unfelt vibration applied via a wristwatch. In this study, we will determine if combining this stimulation with hand task practice is superior to hand task practice alone.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Na Jin Seo
8437920084
seon@musc.edu

Odor Disturbances: Clinical Care Registry

Date Added
September 26th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00080333
Researcher
Thomas Uhde

List of Studies


Keywords
ADD/ADHD, Adolescents, Aging, Allergy, Alzheimers, Anxiety, Asthma, Autism, Autoimmune disease, Central Nervous System, Chronic Fatigue, Depression, Environmental Factors, Fibromyalgia, Inflammation, Memory Loss, Nervous System, Parkinsons, Psychiatry
Summary

Candidates for this study may or may not report disturbances in odor perception as their primary reason for seeking treatment at MUSC. This study is designed to collect long term, observational data from patients who are being treated with routine clinical care in health clinics at MUSC. Data from clinical questionnaires will be de-identified and stored in a database.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Richard Simmons
843-792-7439
simmr@musc.edu

PROMISE-MG: Prospective Multicenter Observational Cohort Study of Comparative Effectiveness of Disease-Modifying Treatments for Myasthenia Gravis

Date Added
September 24th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00077927
Researcher
Katherine Ruzhansky

List of Studies


Keywords
Muscle, Nervous System
Summary

This is an observational study to develop a research registry to collect information from subjects with Myasthenia Gravis (MG) to evaluate the effects of the treatments they receive and to understand how their medical condition and treatment affects their daily life.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Katrina Madden
843-792-9186
maddenka@musc.edu

Direct measurement of motor cortical responses to transcranial direct current stimulation

Date Added
May 15th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00073545
Researcher
Nathan Rowland

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Parkinsons, Surgery
Summary

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has shown the potential to improve symptoms in patients with motor deficits, however its effects have not been consistent in randomized studies to date, limiting widespread adoption of this technology. A critical gap in our knowledge is a detailed understanding of how tDCS affects motor areas in the brain. We propose using tDCS while recording directly from motor cortex using subdural electrocorticography (sECoG) in patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery. We expect this novel approach to broaden our understanding of tDCS application and possibly lead to therapeutic advances in this population.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Ayesha Vohra
843-792-6210
vohra@musc.edu

Operant down-conditioning of the soleus H-reflex in spastic hemiparesis after stroke

Date Added
October 6th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00048307
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies


Keywords
Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

Reflexes are important parts of our movements. When reflexes are not working well, movements are clumsy or even impossible. After stroke, reflex responses may change. Researchers have found that people can learn to increase or decrease a reflex response with training. Recently, we have found that rats and people with partial spinal cord injuries can walk better after they are trained to change a spinal cord reflex. Thus, learning to change a reflex response may help people recover after a nervous system injury. In this study, we aim to examine whether learning to change a spinal reflex through operant conditioning training can improve movement function recovery in people after stroke or other damage to the nervous system.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu



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