PREEMPT CRC: PREvention Employing a Multiomics Plasma-based Test for ColoRectal Cancer

Date Added
June 22nd, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00099252
Researcher
Don Rockey

List of Studies

Keywords
Aging, Cancer/Other, Colonoscopy, Digestive System, Disease Prevention, Men's Health, Prostate
Summary

The Sponsor of this research study is trying to develop a new experimental diagnostic blood test that may help detect colorectal cancer and other diseases. A diagnostic test identifies a specific disease or condition. Experimental means the test has not received approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for sale.
The main goal of this research study is to collect health information and blood samples from people who are going to have a standard-of-care screening colonoscopy. The blood samples along with other health information from patients who take part in the study may help the Sponsor develop new diagnostic tests that may help detect cancer or other diseases in other patients in the future.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Megan Bickford
843-876-8439
bickfome@musc.edu

Single Institution Registry of Prostatic Artery Embolization for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms due to Benign Prostatic Obstruction

Date Added
March 13th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00097914
Researcher
Andre Uflacker

List of Studies

Keywords
Aging, Bladder
Summary

This study will collect prospective data on clinical indications, outcomes, and adverse events related to Prostatic Artery Embolization (PAE) at the Medical University of South Carolina. Patients undergoing surgical treatment for benign prostatic obstruction causing LUTS will also be allowed to enroll in this registry for the purposes of comparison. Patients will be followed at 1, 3, and 12 months post-procedure, for a period of up to 5 years. Patients will remain enrolled in the registry for a period of 5 years.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Andre Uflacker
8438765556
uflackera@musc.edu

Aging Brain Cohort Study-Longitudinal

Date Added
August 23rd, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00091014
Researcher
Julius Fridriksson

List of Studies

Keywords
Aging, Brain, Healthy Volunteer Studies
Summary

This study will examine the behaviors and brains of adults between the ages of 60 and 80. Our goal is to better understand changes associated with the aging process. This includes potential changes in behavior/cognition as well as potential biomarkers for these changes (i.e. biological data like DNA, brain scans or brain activity that are related to these changes). Participants in the study will complete a number of tests that measure their cognitive, language, and sensory abilities. We will collect information about their brains using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) and we will collect information about their genes using DNA extracted from blood samples. We will examine and compare the relationship between brain and behavior at 2 time points for the same 200 individuals. All data collected in this study will be stored in the Aging Brain Cohort repository study.

Institution
USC
Recruitment Contact
Briana Davis
803 576-8420
abcstudy@mailbox.sc.edu

Concomitant sensory stimulation during therapy to enhance hand functional recovery post stroke

Date Added
August 6th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00090790
Researcher
Na Jin Seo

List of Studies

Keywords
Aging, Exercise, Movement Disorders, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Hand disability after stroke has a profound negative impact on functional ability and independence. Hand therapy may be augmented with sensory stimulation for better outcomes. We have developed a novel sensory stimulation - unfelt vibration applied via a wristwatch. In this study, we will determine if combining this stimulation with hand task practice is superior to hand task practice alone.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Na Jin Seo
8437920084
seon@musc.edu

Neuroplasticity Associated with Extended Daily Use of a Sensorimotor Priming Vibration System to Improve Hand Function After Stroke

Date Added
March 5th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00086207
Researcher
Na Jin Seo

List of Studies

Keywords
Aging, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The objective is to determine if continuous use of TheraBracelet in the home has a clinically meaningful effect in chronic stroke survivors. The study design is a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. We will enroll 40 chronic stroke survivors with moderate hand impairment. Subjects will be randomly assigned to the treatment or control group (n=20 per group). All subjects will wear the TheraBracelet device on the paretic wrist for 8 hours/day every day during their normal daily activity for 1 month. The device will deliver vibration (treatment) or no vibration (control). Double-blinding is possible because the treatment vibration is imperceptible (i.e., subthreshold). Measures of neural plasticity, the amount of the paretic arm use in daily living, clinical hand function, biomechanical grip control, and self-reported abilities for activities of daily living will be assessed at baseline, once a week during the month of wearing the device, and for 3-month follow-up, allowing determination of the efficacy and persistence.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Amanda Vatinno
843-792-8970
vatinno@musc.edu

Odor Disturbances: Clinical Care Registry

Date Added
September 26th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00080333
Researcher
Thomas Uhde

List of Studies

Keywords
ADD/ADHD, Adolescents, Aging, Allergy, Alzheimers, Anxiety, Asthma, Autism, Autoimmune disease, Central Nervous System, Chronic Fatigue, Depression, Environmental Factors, Fibromyalgia, Inflammation, Memory Loss, Nervous System, Parkinsons, Psychiatry
Summary

Candidates for this study may or may not report disturbances in odor perception as their primary reason for seeking treatment at MUSC. This study is designed to collect long term, observational data from patients who are being treated with routine clinical care in health clinics at MUSC. Data from clinical questionnaires will be de-identified and stored in a database.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Richard Simmons
843-792-7439
simmr@musc.edu

Human Samples Biorepository

Date Added
August 21st, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00072807
Researcher
Federica del Monte

List of Studies

Keywords
Aging, Cardiovascular, Coronary Artery Disease, Genetics, Heart, Military, Sarcoidosis, Scleroderma, Transplant, Vascular
Summary

The purpose of the study is to generate a bio bank of specimens for research. We will tissue that would otherwise be discarded from clinical or surgical procedure and information from medical records. We will also collect discarded blood, urines and sputum. Collecting samples will help to better understanding the mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases, identify biomarkers for early diagnosis and to predict safety and efficacy of new therapies.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Federica del Monte
843-792-8397
delmonte@musc.edu

Connectome Biomarkers for Predicting Alzheimer's Risk in Traumatic Brain Injury

Date Added
July 17th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00077915
Researcher
Jane Joseph

List of Studies

Keywords
Aging, Alzheimers, Brain, Dementia, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Memory Loss, Military
Summary

Traumatic Brain Injury is a risk factor for Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias. This study will use neuroimaging in Veterans and civilians with a history of TBI or without TBI to understand whether some of the brain changes that occur in Alzheimer's Disease are present in people with a history of TBI. The study is recruiting male and female military Veterans or civilians with or without TBI between the ages of 30 and 65.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Laura Lohnes
843-792-7709
lohnes@musc.edu

Quantitative Neuroimaging Assessment of White Matter Integrity in the Context of Aging and AD

Date Added
December 19th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00073604
Researcher
Andreana Benitez

List of Studies

Keywords
Aging, Alzheimers, Brain, Healthy Volunteer Studies
Summary

The purpose of this study is to use neuroimaging to understand how networks in the brain change over time. Although the single most significant risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) is age, the neurobiological processes underlying the transition from normal aging to AD are not well understood. Our group of researchers has developed ways to use MRI to detect small changes in certain parts of the brain. We will use neuroimaging to understand how the connections in the brain change over time in healthy aging. The goal is to discover which brain changes are present in healthy aging so that future studies can assess the risk for developing Alzheimer's Disease.

Participants will have two study visits (about 2 years apart) where they will undergo tests to assess mental function, fill out questionnaires, and undergo a blood draw, brain MRI and PET scan. At the second visit, participants will not repeat the blood draw and a PET scan.

Participants are required to have a Co-Participant accompany them for the first portion of each visit. This individual must be a reliable informant that has contact with the participant at least once per week.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Katrina Madden
843-792-9186
IAMstudy@musc.edu

Neural Determinants of Age-Related Change in Auditory-Visual Speech Processing

Date Added
September 24th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00070971
Researcher
James Dias

List of Studies

Keywords
Aging, Brain, Central Nervous System, Ears, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Hearing, Language, Minorities, Vision/ Eye
Summary

Older adults typically have trouble identifying the speech they hear, especially in noisy environments. Fortunately, compared to younger adults, older adults are better able to compensate for difficulties identifying the speech they hear by recruiting the visual system. However, the extent to which older adults can benefit from visual input, and how this influence relates to age-related changes in brain structure and function, have not been thoroughly investigated. The general purpose of this study is to determine how age-related changes in brain structure and function affect how well people hear and see. This study seeks participants with normal hearing to mild hearing loss, who also have normal or corrected-to-normal vision.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
James Dias
(843) 792-3921
diasj@musc.edu



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