Combining taVNS with early CIMT to improve health outcomes of infants

Date Added
May 4th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00109558
Researcher
Dorothea Jenkins

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Infant, Movement Disorders, Physical Therapy, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Newborns who are born premature or suffer brain injury at birth are at risk for motor problems that may cause weakness in reaching and grasping on one side of the body. In older children, therapists may use a hand mitt and restraint for the stronger arm, to encourage use of the weaker side, called constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT). Even with the high intensity therapy of CIMT, it typically takes between 40-120 hours total treatment time for most children to improve their motor skills. A non-invasive form of nerve stimulation, transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (taVNS), stimulates a nerve by the ear that enhances learning motor skills. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of taVNS to improve motor skills when paired with CIMT in infants with one-sided weakness at 6-18months of age.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Patricia Coker-Bolt
843-792-7491
coerkpc@musc.edu

Impact of Intense Physical Therapy on Functional Mobility Outcomes in the Acute Stroke Population (<24 hours post-stroke)

Date Added
April 20th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00108635
Researcher
Christine Holmstedt

List of Studies


Keywords
Physical Therapy, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

We propose to enroll 150 individuals with acute stroke admitted to MUSC over the next 12 months and randomize them into increased frequency and usual care PT treatment groups. This study will be designed as a randomized control trial. Patients who agree to participate, will be assigned (at random) to either a treatment group which will receive more frequent intensive therapy services or to the control group (treatment as usual) which will receive the standard amount of therapy services currently provided in the hospital setting (~3-5 times per week). By studying the balance, walking and success of patients in the treatment group compared with the standard of care group- we hope to better understand the effect of more frequent physical therapy services on a patient's independence post stroke.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Christine Holmstedt
843-792-3020
holmsted@musc.edu

Development of a System to Track Upper Extremity Task Practice at Home for Stroke Survivors

Date Added
March 31st, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00107753
Researcher
Na Jin Seo

List of Studies


Keywords
Movement Disorders, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Hand and arm disability after stroke has a profound, negative impact on functional ability and independence. Basic science research suggests that recovery requires high repetitions of task-specific practice. Enough practice cannot be completed during therapy sessions, requiring patients to perform additional task practices at home on their own. Adherence to these home task practices is often limited and is likely a factor reducing the effectiveness of rehabilitation post-stroke. This project will create a system to objectively track stroke survivors' hand and arm task practice at home. The quantity and quality feedback from the system is expected to optimize effective task practice at home by patients. The system is expected to also enable adherence- and progress-driven clinic visits to maximize efficiency of therapy service.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Gabrielle Scronce
919 451 1753
scronce@musc.edu

Telerehabilitation for Aphasia

Date Added
March 1st, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00105880
Researcher
Leonardo Bonilha

List of Studies


Keywords
Speech Disorders, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

To assess comparable efficacy of aphasia therapy administered via telerehab (aphasia remote therapy; ART) to aphasia therapy administered in clinic (in-clinic therapy; I-CT).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Skyler Fontenot
843-792-4088
fontenos@musc.edu

Priming the rehabilitation engine: aerobic exercise as the fuel to spark behavioral improvements in stroke

Date Added
February 2nd, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00105988
Researcher
Ryan Ross

List of Studies

Keywords
Exercise, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke is a leading cause of disability in the U.S. and many Veteran stroke survivors live with severe disability. Despite recent advances in rehabilitation treatments many stroke survivors have persistent physical and mental difficulties such as reduced arm and leg function, difficulty thinking, and depression.
Developing treatments that address these problems is necessary to improve long-term recovery for stroke survivors. Aerobic exercise (AEx) can improve physical and mental function, and reduce depression. Additionally, AEx may enhance physical rehabilitation by making the brain more receptive to, and consequently improving the response to a rehabilitation treatment. Therefore, combining AEx with physical rehabilitation has the potential to improve multiple parts of stroke recovery. This study will examine the effect of combining AEx with physical rehabilitation on physical and mental function in stroke survivors. By gaining a better understanding of the effects of this combined intervention we aim to advance the rehabilitative care of Veteran stroke survivors.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Ryan Ross
843-792-3477
rossre@musc.edu

INTEGRATION OF mHEALTH INTO THE CARE OF PATIENTS WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE TO INCREASE HYDROXYUREA UTILIZATION – mESH study

Date Added
July 23rd, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00097832
Researcher
Cathy Melvin

List of Studies


Keywords
Blood Disorders, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The purpose of this research project is to evaluate the effectiveness of a mobile health (mHealth) application in improving adherence to hydroxyurea therapy in patients with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). Participants will be asked to install an application on their phone that will remind them to take their medication regularly. It notifies the participants when it is time to request a refill, it tracks their hydroxyurea use, and it gives them information on their medication. It also has resources that could be helpful for the ongoing care of their sickle cell disease. This is a 24-week project with 3 study visits. The first study visit will be at the beginning of the study period (enrollment or baseline visit), the second will be at approximately 12 weeks, and the third is at the end of the 24 weeks. At each visit, participants will complete a survey, share with us their experience with the application, and share with us where they refilled their medications. Some participants will also be asked to complete an interview at the end of their final study visit. Patient participants will receive a $25 Walmart Gift card at each of visits (including an additional $25 gift card for the optional interview) for their participation.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Sarah Bourne
8433452545
bourne@musc.edu

Neurophysiological characterization of dry needling in people with spasticity due to stroke

Date Added
March 3rd, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00095077
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies


Keywords
Central Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The study team is recruiting 20 adults with spasticity due to chronic stroke and 20 adults with no neurological injuries for a 2 day study. In people with chronic stroke, one of the most common and disabling problems is spasticity (increased muscle tone or muscle stiffness). The purpose of this research study is to examine effects of dry needling on the nervous system (pathways between the muscle, spinal cord, and brain) in people with spasticity due to chronic stroke. Dry needling is a procedure in which a thin, stainless steel needle is inserted into your skin to produce a muscle twitch response. It is intended to release a knot in your muscle and relieve pain.

The total study duration is 2 days. The first visit will take about 3 hours, during which dry needling will take place, and the second visit will take about 1 hour. During both visits you will be asked to participate in examinations of reflexes (muscle responses to non-invasive nerve stimulation) and arm/leg function.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Speech entrainment for Aphasia Recovery

Date Added
January 6th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00091924
Researcher
Leonardo Bonilha

List of Studies


Keywords
Language, Speech Disorders, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

After a stroke, many people experience a language impairment called aphasia. One of the most debilitating types of aphasia is non-fluent aphasia. Non-fluent aphasia is defined by significantly reduced speech production, with the speaker producing only a few words or even less. Speech entrainment therapy (SET) is a treatment that has been shown to increase fluency in people with non-fluent aphasia. Our study looks to define the best dose of SET that leads to sustained improvements in spontaneous speech production.
Participants who are eligible will undergo baseline language testing, an MRI, and will be randomized into one of 4 treatment groups: SET for 3 weeks, SET for 4.5 weeks, SET for 6 weeks, and no treatment (control group).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Anna Doyle
843-792-3678
doylean@musc.edu

MultiStem® Administration for Stroke Treatment and Enhanced Recovery Study

Date Added
September 10th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00088665
Researcher
Souvik Sen

List of Studies

Keywords
Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

MultiStem is regenerative medicine derived from donated human cells to treat acute ischemic stroke within 36 hours after symptom onset. Stroke leads to brain cell injury and many stroke patients suffer functional deficits as results. The purpose of this study is to evaluate safety and effectiveness of MultiStem on functional outcome in subjects with ischemic stroke.

Institution
Palmetto
Recruitment Contact
Mihyun Lim
803-545-6078
Mihyun.Lim@uscmed.sc.edu

Effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on cortical oscillations during a virtual reality task

Date Added
August 20th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00087153
Researcher
Nathan Rowland

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Parkinsons, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has shown the potential to improve symptoms in patients with movement deficits, such as Parkinson's disease and chronic stroke. However, the effects of tDCS have so far not been proven on a wider scale due to lack of knowledge regarding exactly how tDCS works. This has limited the adoption of this potentially useful therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease, chronic stroke and other conditions affecting movement. We think that by studying the effect of tDCS on brain signals while subjects perform a virtual reality task that requires integration of visual and motor information we can separate out exactly what occurs in the brain when tDCS is turned on. We expect this approach to broaden our understanding of tDCS application in conditions affecting movement and possibly lead to therapeutic advances in this population.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brenna Baker-Vogel
(843)792-0651
bakebren@musc.edu



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