Operant Conditioning of Spinal Reflexes to Enhance Motor Function Recovery after Spinal Cord injury

Date Added
April 7th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00095583
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies

Keywords
Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

The purpose of the first portion of this study is to gather feedback from clinicians on the usability of the current system and procedure, so the researchers can make reflex training more useful and usable for improving recovery after spinal cord injury or other nervous system injuries and diseases. The researchers are recruiting 20 therapists who have been actively practicing physical medicine and 30 adults with no known neurological conditions to test system usability and the reflex operant conditioning protocol. For this portion of the study, there are 5 visits.

The purpose of the second part of the study is to validate the capacity of the system to change the size of the targeted reflex. For this the researchers are recruiting 25 individuals with chronic incomplete SCI who have spasticity in the leg to participate in the reflex training procedure. The study involves approximately 45 visits with a total study duration of about 6 months.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF ACUTE FLACCID MYELITIS (AFM) TO DEFINE NATURAL HISTORY, RISK FACTORS, AND PATHOGENETIC MECHANISMS

Date Added
December 11th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00094024
Researcher
Sandra Fowler

List of Studies

Keywords
Brain, Infectious Diseases, Nerve, Nervous System, Spinal Cord
Summary

This study is designed to gain a better understanding and natural history of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM).

This study will include reviewing medical records to record information about the medications taken to treat AFM and your social history (smoking, alcohol and drug use). The results of lab tests, imaging studies and tests will also be collected to determine if you have any damage to your nerves that are done by your clinical care team to diagnose your AFM.

Samples from Mouth, nose, stool and blood will be collected as a part of this study. Any remaining spinal fluid that is in the lab from the spinal tap from clinical labs will also be collected. A neurological exam and tests to determine issues with muscles, functionality and strength after being diagnosed with AFM will also be performed as a part of this study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Sandra Fowler
8437922385
fowlersl@musc.edu

Characterization of physiological changes induced through motor-evoked potential conditioning in people with spinal cord injury

Date Added
December 3rd, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00091457
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies

Keywords
Central Nervous System, Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

We are currently recruiting volunteers who are interested in participating in a brain-spinal cord-muscle response training study that aims to better understand the changes that take place in the nervous system as a result of this type of training. After spinal cord injury, brain-to-muscle connections are often interrupted. Because these connections are important in movement control, when they are not working well, movements may be disturbed. Researchers have found that people can learn to strengthen these connections through training. Strengthening these connections may be able to improve movement control and recovery after injuries.

Research participants will be asked to stand, sit, and walk during the study sessions. Electrodes are placed on the skin over leg muscles for monitoring muscle activity. For examining brain-to-muscle connections, we use transcranial magnetic stimulation. The stimulation is applied over the head and will indirectly stimulate brain cells with little or no discomfort.

Participation in this study requires approximately three sessions per week for four months, followed by two to three sessions over another three months. Each session lasts approximately 1 hour. Participants will receive a mileage reimbursement.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Neuromodulation of motor and sensory spinal pathways in subjects undergoing epidural spinal cord stimulation.

Date Added
October 15th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00089881
Researcher
Nathan Rowland

List of Studies

Keywords
Central Nervous System, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Pain, Spinal Cord
Summary

Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy is currently used to treat the symptoms of chronic pain. Studying the effect of SCS during muscle testing, proprioception testing and multiple gait analysis, we expect to gain understanding of exactly how SCS influences motor and sensory pathways of the spinal cord. We expect this approach to broaden our understanding in the application of SCS in the chronic pain conditions, and may lead to therapeutic advances in other populations, for example, patients with spinal cord injury.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Taylor Mayberry
5024423087
mayberrt@musc.edu

Aging and Spinal Cord Injury: A 45-year Longitudinal Study

Date Added
February 24th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00060766
Researcher
James Krause

List of Studies

Keywords
Spinal Cord
Summary

Our purpose is to conduct a 45-year follow-up, the ninth data collection in the SCI Longitudinal Aging Study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Richard Aust
843-792-2605
aust@musc.edu

Operant Conditioning of Spinal Reflexes in Youth

Date Added
August 4th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00046453
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies

Keywords
Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

Reflexes are important parts of our movements. When reflexes are not working well, movements are clumsy or even impossible. Researchers have found that people can learn to increase or decrease a reflex response with training. Recently, we have found that rats with spinal cord injuries can walk better after they are trained to change a spinal cord reflex. Thus, learning to change a reflex response may help people recover after a nervous system injury. We are currently studying effects of spinal cord reflex training (e.g., a knee jerk reflex) in people in early adulthood. We hope that the results of this study will help us develop spinal reflex training as a new treatment to help people in early adulthood recover better after spinal cord injury or other damage to the nervous system.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Operant Conditioning of Spinal Reflexes to Improve Motor Function Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

Date Added
April 7th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00042082
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies

Keywords
Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

Reflexes are important parts of our movements. When reflexes are not working well, movements are clumsy or even impossible. After spinal cord injury, reflex responses may change. Researchers have found that people can learn to increase or decrease a reflex response with training. Recently, we have found that rats with spinal cord injuries can walk better after they are trained to change a spinal reflex. Thus, learning to change a reflex response may help people recover after a nervous system injury. In this study, we aim to examine whether learning to change a spinal reflex through operant conditioning training can improve movement function recovery after spinal cord injury.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Operant Conditioning of Motor Evoked Potential to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to Improve Motor Function Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

Date Added
April 7th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00042109
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies

Keywords
Movement Disorders, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

Over many years, we have learnt that the brain's connections with the spinal cord change in response to injury or training. Because brain-spinal cord (i.e., corticospinal) pathways are very important in movement control, restoring function of these pathways could help to restore useful movement after spinal cord injury (SCI). In this project, we hypothesize that operant conditioning training of the muscle response to non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation can strengthen the functional connectivity of corticospinal pathways and thereby alleviate movement problems in people with chronic incomplete SCI. Specifically, through this project, we will investigate the effects of strengthening the corticospinal connection to the ankle dorsiflexor muscles through operant up-conditioning of the muscle evoked response, in hope to enhance the function of corticospinal pathways and alleviate foot drop (i.e., weak ankle dorsiflexion resulting in toe drop and drag) during walking in people with chronic incomplete SCI.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Modulation of Spinal Reflexes during Walking in People after Spinal Cord Injury

Date Added
April 7th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00042824
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies

Keywords
Movement Disorders, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

Spinal reflexes take important part in our movement. After spinal cord injury (SCI), reflexes often change. For many years, researchers and doctors have assumed that abnormally acting spinal reflexes lead to movement problems, without clear scientific evidence. For example, in people who suffer spasticity, a common problem after SCI, walking is disturbed, presumably because stretch reflexes (e.g., knee jerk reflex) and some other reflexes are not working well. Yet, which reflex is causing a problem in what way has not been well understood. Such understanding is very important in developing and applying effective therapies for improving gait recovery after SCI. Therefore, in this project, we are studying spinal stretch reflexes and other reflexes during walking, to understand how these reflexes contribute to spastic gait problems in people with chronic incomplete SCI. Successful completion of this project will result in better understanding of spastic gait problems, which in turn, will help us develop more effective therapy application and improve the quality of life in people after SCI.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Clinical Database for Rehabilitation Research after Neurological Injury

Date Added
May 7th, 2012
PRO Number
Pro00015991
Researcher
Steven Kautz

List of Studies

Keywords
Healthy Volunteer Studies, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord, Stroke
Summary

In this study researchers aim to improve the collaborative research efforts of the Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions at the Medical University of South Carolina. The Center is comprised of several laboratories, including: the Communication and Swallowing Laboratory; the Locomotor Energetics and Assessment Laboratory; the Locomotor Rehabilitation Laboratory; the Neuromuscular Assessment Laboratory; and the Upper Extremity Motor Function Laboratory. The PI and investigators will recruit for their current and future studies in the above laboratories from the Clinical Database established here. Studies utilizing the Clinical Database will not include PHI but will only link to the Clinical Database individual patient code. This study is completed by completing a simple screening form with study personnel. Medical care/treatment future participation in studies is not influenced by inclusion in this study. We are also recruiting Healthy Controls for this study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aaron Embry
843-792-8198
embry@musc.edu



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