International Intestinal Failure Registry

Date Added
August 4th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00112520
Researcher
Candi Jump

List of Studies


Keywords
Digestive System, Metabolism, Nutrition, Rare Diseases
Summary

The International Intestinal Failure Registry (IFR) is an initiative of the Intestinal Rehabilitation and Transplant Association (IRTA) and The Transplantation Society (TTS) and will be managed by these organizations. The primary objective of this project is to create a large international database of children with intestinal failure to characterize their management and outcome and guide the development of best practices and evidence-based management.

The primary objective of this project is to create a large international database of children with intestinal failure to characterize their management and outcome and guide the development of best practices and evidence-based management.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Candi Jump
843-792-5021
jump@musc.edu

The effects of time restricted feeding on AGE-RAGE signaling in women at high risk for breast cancer

Date Added
June 15th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00109489
Researcher
Harsha Karanchi

List of Studies


Keywords
Disease Prevention, Nutrition, Women's Health
Summary

The purpose of this research study is to learn about time restricted feeding and breast cancer risk markers in post-menopausal women with prediabetes. Time restricted feeding involves changing the daily eating period for consumption of meals and snacks.

Participants will be randomly assigned to either the time restricted feeding group with a daily eating period of 8 hours or the control group with a daily eating period of greater than or equal to 12 hours. There are 2 in-person study visits to have blood, urine and vital signs collected and 8 remote or phone visits with a psychologist to assist with the eating schedule. The study will take about 3 1/2 months. There is no cost to participate. Compensation for the 2 in-person visits is provided..

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lori Spillers
8438760977
spillerl@musc.edu

Malabsorption as a Cause of Iron Deficiency Anemia

Date Added
November 17th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00096495
Researcher
Sara Hatoum

List of Studies

Keywords
Blood Disorders, Nutrition
Summary

Iron deficiency is the most common type of nutritional deficiency in the world and is unique in that it affects both developing and developed countries. The most common complication of iron deficiency is anemia (a low level of iron in the red blood cells). Although patients with anemia may not have any symptoms, many patients with anemia do have problems such as fatigue, tiredness, shortness of breath and/or pale skin.

Study participants will undergo some evaluations in addition to their regular anemia work up. These include the following:
1) Questionnaires;
2)Iron absorption test consisting of 3 blood samples over the span of 3 hours after having drank a liquid iron solution.
3) stool and urine sample collection.
4) food diary to monitor iron dietary intake.
5)If an upper endoscopy is also part of the participant's standard of care workup, the study team will ask the endoscopist to take an additional biopsy sample to test for one of the proteins that is responsible for taking up iron from your food into the intestine.

Participation in this study will last over 2 visits lasting 1 to 4 hours each. The two visits should fall within the span of 1 month of each other.

Risks associated with this study include side effects of oral iron supplement ingestion. This oral iron may have a metallic taste. In some patients, it could even cause nausea or vomit, abdominal gas or abdominal discomfort. We also ask to draw blood and blood withdrawal may have side effects including bruising, pain, bleeding or rarely infection at the puncture site. Confidentiality breach is also a risk.

There are no direct benefits to the participant. However, this study will help advance diagnosis and clinical assessments of iron deficiency anemia.

The alternative is to not participate in the study and continue regular iron deficiency anemia work up exclusively with the treating physician and medical team.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Halim Bou Daher
(843) 792-0650
boudaher@musc.edu

The Effect Of Epitomee Capsule On Body Weight In Patients With Overweight And Obesity With And Without Pre-Diabetes

Date Added
August 19th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00094007
Researcher
Patrick O'Neil

List of Studies


Keywords
Nutrition, Obesity, Weight Control
Summary

This study is testing the effects on weight loss of a capsule-delivered device that expands in the stomach to help create a sense of fullness. The device then leaves the stomach, disintegrates and is excreted. In this study participants will receive either the device or a placebo capsule that looks the same. Participants will receive dietary and exercise counseling at most visits to help them lose weight. The 24-week losses of participants who get the device will be compared to the losses of those who get the placebo capsule to determine the effect on weight loss. Changes in other health markers will also be assessed.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Mary Harley
843-792-5428
harleyma@musc.edu

Impact of Disparities in Food Security on Glycemic Control and Health Care Utilization Among Youth and Young Adults with Diabetes

Date Added
March 19th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00075894
Researcher
Angela Liese

List of Studies

Keywords
Adolescents, Diabetes, Environmental Factors, Ethnicity and Disease, Nutrition
Summary

Many youth and young adults (YYAs) with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), particularly those of minority race/ethnicity, do not achieve optimal glycemic control and household food insecurity (HFI) may be a key barrier. HFI is the limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods. The SEARCH Food Security (SFS) cohort study is designed as an ancillary study to the ongoing NIH/NIDDK-funded SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth 4 Cohort study. The aims of the SFS study are to (1) Initiate a food insecurity cohort study of 1,187 YYAs aged 15-35 years (53% minority) with T1D and T2D by adding two data collection time points to the ongoing SEARCH 4 study in three of the five SEARCH sites, including South Carolina, Colorado and Washington; (2) Evaluate how HFI influences changes in glycemic control in YYAs with T1D and T2D; (3) Identify the pathways through which food insecurity may act; and (4) Evaluate the influence of HFI on changes in health care utilization and medical and non-medical health care costs in YYAs with T1D and T2D.

Institution
Greenville
Recruitment Contact
Jessica Stucker
803-777-1961
jstucker@mailbox.sc.edu

A Mobile-Support Program to Facilitate Nutritional Caregiving in Head and Neck Cancer

Date Added
August 20th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00066211
Researcher
Katherine Sterba

List of Studies


Keywords
Cancer/Head & Neck, Nutrition
Summary

This research will develop and test a nutrition-focused mobile-support program for head and neck cancer patients and their caregivers at the end of treatment.

Phase I: To guide system development, we will conduct interviews with 15 individuals with head and neck cancer and their caregivers to understand the nutritional challenges faced at the end of treatment. We will also recruit 128 oncology dietitians to complete online surveys to identify key caregiver nutritional support tasks and caregiver demands.

Phase II: After system development, we will recruit 33 head and neck cancer patients and their main supporters to pretest our nutrition support system. Participants will be asked to complete two surveys and a one-time clinic session. The clinic session will include information and resources about symptoms and concerns and after the visit, the program will provide follow-up resources and mobile support for one month. Lastly, we we will conduct individual/small group interviews with 10 head and neck health care providers to evaluate feasibility and recommendations for future system development.

The information from this study may help us to improve supportive care programs in the future to help others as they complete head and neck cancer treatment.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jama Olsen
843-876-2438
olsen@musc.edu



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