Racial/ethnic disparities in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) among women: examination of clinical factors and genetics

Date Added
August 11th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00098592
Researcher
Mara Lennard Richard

List of Studies


Keywords
Autoimmune disease, Ethnicity and Disease, Genetics, Kidney, Lupus, Women's Health
Summary

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) also known as lupus is a complex autoimmune disorder where the immune system attacks itself instead of external pathogens that can cause disease like bacteria or viruses. The large majority of SLE patients are women. The purpose of this study is to better understand how SLE affects overall patient health in women and expression of genes linked to the development of SLE. Part of this study involves collection of a blood sample at a single visit to test expression of genes linked to SLE. This study will compare demographic and clinical characteristics and genetic differences among women with SLE from three racial/ethnic groups. Better understanding of racial/ethnic differences in health and genetic expression of SLE could help reduce poor disease outcomes such as kidney or heart disease. Results will help us learn more about differences in SLE health across different racial/ethnic backgrounds and will guide medical care.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jonathan Flume
843-792-3926
jof63@musc.edu

A Mixed Methods Approach to Symptom Clusters in Black Women with Heart Failure Preserved Ejection Fraction: A Feasibility Study

Date Added
August 7th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00101261
Researcher
Alexandra Ruppe

List of Studies

Keywords
Cardiovascular, Ethnicity and Disease, Heart, Minorities, Non-interventional, Shortness of Breath, Women's Health
Summary

This study aims to explore symptoms for Black women with heart failure using surveys and interviews. Black women have not been included in the majority of heart failure research. It is important that Black women have a voice and the ability to share their symptom experience. The goal of this research is to study clusters of heart failure symptoms in Black women to eventually improve symptom education, monitoring, and treatments.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Alexandra Ruppe
8034176635
moseleal@musc.edu

Identifying functional regulatory marks underlying monocyte dysfunction in scleroderma

Date Added
February 19th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00085936
Researcher
Paula Ramos

List of Studies


Keywords
Autoimmune disease, Ethnicity and Disease, Genetics, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Immune System, Inflammation, Minorities, Scleroderma, Women's Health
Summary

Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is a chronic autoimmune disease, characterized by dysregulation of immune cells in the blood and subsequent fibrosis and vascular dysfunction, associated with significant mortality and morbidity, disproportionately affecting women and African Americans, and without satisfactory treatments. Monocytes, a type of blood immune cells, are critically involved, but the mechanisms responsible for their deregulation in scleroderma remain largely unknown. The goal of this project is to understand how the regulation of monocytes differs between scleroderma and healthy individuals. Volunteers will be asked to provide a blood sample, for which modest compensation will be provided. This is not a drug study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Tyler Malone
843-792-5935
malonety@musc.edu

Impact of Disparities in Food Security on Glycemic Control and Health Care Utilization Among Youth and Young Adults with Diabetes

Date Added
March 19th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00075894
Researcher
Angela Liese

List of Studies

Keywords
Adolescents, Diabetes, Environmental Factors, Ethnicity and Disease, Nutrition
Summary

Many youth and young adults (YYAs) with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), particularly those of minority race/ethnicity, do not achieve optimal glycemic control and household food insecurity (HFI) may be a key barrier. HFI is the limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods. The SEARCH Food Security (SFS) cohort study is designed as an ancillary study to the ongoing NIH/NIDDK-funded SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth 4 Cohort study. The aims of the SFS study are to (1) Initiate a food insecurity cohort study of 1,187 YYAs aged 15-35 years (53% minority) with T1D and T2D by adding two data collection time points to the ongoing SEARCH 4 study in three of the five SEARCH sites, including South Carolina, Colorado and Washington; (2) Evaluate how HFI influences changes in glycemic control in YYAs with T1D and T2D; (3) Identify the pathways through which food insecurity may act; and (4) Evaluate the influence of HFI on changes in health care utilization and medical and non-medical health care costs in YYAs with T1D and T2D.

Institution
Greenville
Recruitment Contact
Jessica Stucker
803-777-1961
jstucker@mailbox.sc.edu

The Core Center for Clinical Research, Improving Minority Health in Rheumatic Diseases

Date Added
January 15th, 2013
PRO Number
Pro00021985
Researcher
Gary Gilkeson

List of Studies


Keywords
Autoimmune disease, Environmental Factors, Ethnicity and Disease, Genetics, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Lupus, Minorities, Rare Diseases, Scleroderma
Summary

Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus; SLE) and Systemic Sclerosis (scleroderma; SSc) are relatively rare rheumatic diseases that disproportionately impact the African American community, and particularly African American women. The causes of lupus and scleroderma are unknown, but thought to include both genetic and environmental factors. We are enrolling lupus and scleroderma patients, and healthy control subjects. This is not a drug study. The purpose of this study is to better understand the factors that predispose people to develop lupus and scleroderma. Information about medical, social and family history, medications, physical exam findings, and laboratory tests will be collected for analysis. This study will involve approximately 1360 volunteers.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jonathan Flume
843-792-3926
jof63@musc.edu



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