Randomized Controlled Trial of AboutFace: A Novel Video Storytelling Resource to Improve Access, Engagement, and Utilization of Mental Health Treatment among Veterans with PTSD Save

Date Added
December 5th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00072331
Researcher
Anouk Grubaugh

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Anxiety, Depression, Military, Psychiatry, Stress Disorders
Summary

Behavioral health problems among Veterans have raised awareness of the critical need for more reliable, effective, and accessible ways to recognize those in need, direct them to help, and ensure that they receive the best evidence-based care available. AboutFace is a novel peer education program that features the personal stories of Veterans and is designed to improve Veterans' likelihood of engaging in PTSD specialty care. Using a randomized controlled study design we propose to compare the efficacy of AboutFace relative to standard care for improving treatment engagement and outcomes. Additional data from VA providers will provide valuable information on wide scale implementation and dissemination of AboutFace. If AboutFace increases access of services, data will have broad implications for overcoming barriers to care for Veterans with PTSD and other stigmatized conditions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Anouk Grubaugh
843-532-6672
grubaugh@musc.edu

The Efficacy of 90-Minute vs. 60-Minute Sessions of Prolonged Exposure for PTSD: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Active Duty Military Personnel Save

Date Added
October 3rd, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00069686
Researcher
Wendy Muzzy

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Anxiety, Depression, Mental Health, Military, Psychiatry
Summary

The purpose of the study is to examine whether 60-minute sessions of Prolonged Exposure (PE) is as effective as the standard 90-minute sessions in reducing the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PE is a well-researched, very effective individual (one-to-one) therapy that is designed to help people to deal with traumatic events they have suffered in the past, including combat. This study is being conducted at the Charleston VA Medical Center, surrounding Community-Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOCs), and in the community. It will involve approximately 200 active duty participants. This research is funded by the Department of Defense.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Stephanie Hart
843-789-6519
zeigls@musc.edu

The Effects of Theta-Burst Stimulation Duration on Human Motor Cortex Excitability Save

Date Added
August 1st, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00068775
Researcher
Lisa Mcteague

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Psychiatry, Rehabilitation Studies
Summary

The study will use a new method for non-invasively examining the brain called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). TMS involves placing a coil of wire above the scalp and intermittently passing a very powerful current through it. This current produces energy in the form of a magnetic field that passes through the scalp. The magnetic field, in turn, induces a much weaker electrical current in the brain, causing the neurons directly under the coil to activate for a brief period of time. The U.S. Federal Drug Administration has approved TMS as a method for treating depression since 2008. By using TMS, we can evaluate how well your brain is controlling one of your hand or leg muscles. One way to measure this is by recording activity via electrodes on the hand opposite the side of the brain being stimulated. For example we will be stimulating on the left side of the brain and recording from electrodes on your right hand. In this study we are determining the effects of different types of repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) protocols on hand movement. rTMS means that the magnetic pulses are applied consecutively, and at a specified pace- the frequency. The specific type of rTMS you will receive is called "theta-burst stimulation" (TBS). TBS is characterized by a specific frequency of stimulation.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
John Henderson
792-5560
henderjs@musc.edu

A Prospective, Double Blind, Randomized, Controlled Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of the Brainsway (HAC-Coil) deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (DTMS) System for the Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Save

Date Added
June 27th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00064375
Researcher
Mark George

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Depression, Military, Psychiatry, Stress Disorders
Summary

Objectives: The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of DTMS for the treatment of PTSD.
Patient Population: 176 male and female subjects, 22-68 years of age, currently diagnosed with PTSD according to the DSM-V criteria.
Structure: A randomized, controlled, prospective, 9 week, double blind, multicenter study.
Blinding: The treatment administrator, study rater, all study personnel and patients will be blinded to the treatment being administered.
Concurrent Control: The study group will receive active DTMS treatment and the control group will receive inactive, sham treatment.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Matthew Schmidt
843 577 5011 ext 5209
matthew.schmidt@va.gov

Optimization of ECT in the Treatment of Veterans with Co-morbid Major Depression and PTSD Save

Date Added
May 2nd, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00062581
Researcher
Mark George

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Depression, Military, Psychiatry
Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine if there are any differences in the improvement of MDD and PTSD symptoms when using two different types of ECT, and also to determine what effect recalling two different memories (a positive memory or negative PTSD memory) just prior to receiving ECT may have on PTSD symptoms. The two types of ECT treatment to be used in this study are called right unilateral ultrabrief (RUL UB) ECT and bilateral brief pulse (BL BP) ECT. Both types of ECT are widely used in the treatment of depression and are commonly used when ECT is recommended. This study will involve 70 (35 local and 35 at Long Beach VA site) subjects who are veterans suffering from MDD and PTSD.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Matthew Schmidt
843-577-5011 ext 5209
NA

Imaging Framework for Testing GABAergic/glutamatergic Drugs in Bipolar Alcoholics Save

Date Added
April 4th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00064964
Researcher
James Prisciandaro

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Alcohol, Depression, Mental Health, Psychiatry, Substance Use
Summary

This study examines the effects of the medication gabapentin and the supplement n-acetylcysteine among individuals with Bipolar Disorder who regularly drink alcohol. Participants in this study will take gabapentin, n-acetylcysteine, and matched placebo (one at a time) for 5 days each. There are 8 study visits, including 3 MRI scans.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Sara Hix
843-792-0572
hixs@musc.edu

A Preliminary Investigation of Pre-Frontal repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) for the Treatment of Cannabis Use Disorder. Save

Date Added
January 3rd, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00062407
Researcher
Gregory Sahlem

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Mental Health, Psychiatry
Summary

Recent research suggests that a new kind of treatment, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can help people with substance use disorders cut down or quit using. This study seeks to recruit individuals who are currently heavy marijuana users who are attempting to cut down or quit using marijuana. Participants will have 20 treatments of active or sham rTMS over 10 visits. In addition to having a 50% chance of receiving rTMS, participants will be given behavioral counseling. Participants who received sham rTMS will have the opportunity to receive active rTMS after they complete the study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Margaret Caruso
843-792-5215
warnerma@musc.edu

Neuroscience-Informed Treatment Development for Adolescent Alcohol Use Save

Date Added
October 4th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00058771
Researcher
Lindsay Squeglia

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Adolescents, Alcohol, Brain, Drug Studies, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Substance Use
Summary

This study will examine the effect of N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), an over-the-counter antioxidant supplement on brains of youth (ages 15-19) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 55 adolescents will receive, in a counterbalanced order, a 10-day course of NAC 1200 mg twice daily and a subsequent 10-day course of matched placebo twice daily, separated by 11 days. Urine samples will be collected at screening and urine and blood samples will be collected before and after each course of medication treatment. Participants will receive a 1- hour MRI scan at baseline and after each treatment trial.

You/your child could be eligible to participate if he or she is:
Between the ages of 15 and 19.
May or may not drink alcohol.
Participants must provide informed consent and youth under 18 must have parental consent to participate.
Compensation is available to those who qualify.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Anna Maralit
(843) 792-7317
porteann@musc.edu

Measuring Consciousness From Theory to Practice: Nuts and Bolts Save

Date Added
June 7th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00054195
Researcher
Mark George

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Brain, Psychiatry
Summary

We will study healthy adults with a brain stimulation tool (TMS) either inside or outside of the MRI scanner, and test with EEG whether it matters where we place the TMS coil on the head. The TMS induced changes in EEG have been proposed as a surrogate measure of brain connectedness, which changes greatly when we are conscious and when we are not.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Sarah Hamilton
843-876-5141
hamilsar@musc.edu

Effects of Oxytocin on Alcohol Craving and Intimate Partner Aggression Save

Date Added
May 3rd, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00054689
Researcher
Julianne Hellmuth

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Alcohol, Drug Studies, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Mental Health, Psychiatry
Summary

Alcohol use disorders (AUD) and intimate partner aggression (IPA) frequently co-occur. There are significant health and economic burdens associated with AUD and co-occurring IPA, and little empirical data to guide treatment efforts. The neuropeptide oxytocin may help mitigate both AUD and IPA. However, clinical data examining oxytocin's effects on human aggression is scant. The proposed study is designed to address these gaps in the literature by utilizing a human laboratory paradigm to test the effects of oxytocin on craving and aggression among couples with AUD and co-occurring IPA.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Charli Kirby
843-300-9577
Kirbych@musc.edu

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