Clinical Feasibility of Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound Pulsation for the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Date Added
July 6th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00109178
Researcher
Mark George

List of Studies


Keywords
Anxiety
Summary

The purpose of this research is to test out a new way of treating generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) with low intensity focused ultrasound pulsation (LIFUP). If the subject agree to participate in the research study, the participation will last approximately 10.5 hours over seven (7) days. The visits are as follows: 1- consent and MRI, 2- and 3- focused ultrasound will be delivered outside of the MRI environment, 4- MRI plus focused ultrasound, 5- assessments 1 week post focused ultrasound, and 6- one month follow-up assessments. Research studies are voluntary and include only people who agree to take part.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Sarah Huffman
843-792-8672
huffmans@musc.edu

The International Randomized Controlled Trial of Two Forms of Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) for Severe Depression: Focal Electrically-Administered Seizure Therapy (FEAST) and Right Unilateral Ultrabrief (The iFEAST Study)

Date Added
June 2nd, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00098725
Researcher
Mark George

List of Studies


Keywords
Depression, Mental Health
Summary

This is a research study to find out if a new form of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is as effective and safe as a current form. The new form of ECT is called FEAST which stands for Focal Electrically Administered Seizure Therapy. This new form uses different electrode placement on the head and a different way of delivering the electricity. FEAST will be administered with an investigational device in this clinical trial. If enrolled in this this study, participants will be randomly assigned (like flipping a coin) to receiving FEAST or the current standard form of ECT called Right Unilateral UltraBrief ECT (RUL UB).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Morgan Dancy
843-876-5141
maddoxm@musc.edu

RECOVER: A PRospective, Multi-cEnter, Randomized Controlled Blinded Trial DemOnstrating the Safety and Effectiveness of VNS Therapy® System as AdjunctivE Therapy Versus a No Stimulation Control in Subjects With Treatment-Resistant Depression

Date Added
March 10th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00095951
Researcher
Mark George

List of Studies


Keywords
Depression, Mental Health, Psychiatry
Summary

Depression is a very common disorder that is most often chronic or recurrent in nature. Many subjects do not respond adequately to an initial antidepressant treatment trial. Subjects who do not respond adequately to multiple therapeutic interventions are considered to have treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Among the treatment options for subjects with TRD is Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) Therapy.This blinded, randomized, multicenter controlled study is intended to collect evidence that VNS Therapy as an adjunctive therapy improves health outcomes for patients with TRD.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Morgan Dancy
843-876-5141
maddoxm@musc.edu

Randomized controlled trial of EEG/fMRI Controlled TMS For Treating Depression

Date Added
February 6th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00074695
Researcher
Mark George

List of Studies


Keywords
Depression
Summary

Currently rTMS for treating depression is delivered without knowing whether the TMS pulses are synchronized with the patient's brain rhythms. We have built a combined TMS/fMRI/EEG machine and have shown that delivering a TMS pulse over the prefrontal cortex precisely timed produces a bigger brain response. We now wonder if precisely timing the TMS pulses might enhance the antidepressant effects of TMS. We will randomize depressed patients to either the current standard of care, or the same TMS but precisely timed.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Morgan Dancy
843 876 5142
maddoxm@musc.edu

A Prospective Multicenter Double Blind Randomized Controlled Trial to Compare the Efficacy of the H7-Coil to H1-Coil Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (DTMS) in Subjects with Major Depression Disorder (MDD)

Date Added
February 28th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00061794
Researcher
Mark George

List of Studies


Keywords
Depression
Summary

The purpose of this study is to compare the antidepressant efficacy of two different coils used to stimulate the brain during rTMS (repetitive TMS), including the evaluation of both the safety and effectiveness of the test article for the H-7 coil. This study compares the H7-coil (which is new and experimental, and not FDA approved at this time) to the H1-Coil (which is FDA approved to treat depression) deep brain rTMS in subjects with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Matthew Schmidt
843 876 5142
schmidm@musc.edu

Measuring Consciousness From Theory to Practice: Nuts and Bolts

Date Added
June 7th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00054195
Researcher
Mark George

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Psychiatry
Summary

We will study healthy adults with a brain stimulation tool (TMS) either inside or outside of the MRI scanner, and test with EEG whether it matters where we place the TMS coil on the head. The TMS induced changes in EEG have been proposed as a surrogate measure of brain connectedness, which changes greatly when we are conscious and when we are not.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Sarah Hamilton
843-876-5141
hamilsar@musc.edu

Determining the best dose of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT): comparing seizure threshold titration with two different fixed currents (600 mA vs. 900 mA)

Date Added
June 2nd, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00044575
Researcher
Mark George

List of Studies


Keywords
Depression
Summary

Over the past 30 years we have discovered that both the efficacy and the side effects of ECT come not only from the induced seizure, but by the currents of electricity and where they go in the brain. In all patients we now determine, at the first treatment session, the minimum dose of electricity needed to produce a seizure. This is called the seizure threshold. Subsequent treatments are then given at 6 or 9 times this number. The method of titrating has not been fully explored. We propose to titrate with two different currents, one of which is much lower than standard clinical practice. We need to do this twice in each patient, on the first and second treatment sessions, and compare the difference. If we find that that lower currents are paradoxically better, then this will change ECT practice around the world. Patients will receive less overall electricity, with likely fewer side effects.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
John Henderson
843 876 5142
henderjs@musc.edu



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