Dermoscopic Features in Infantile Hemangiomas Save

Date Added
October 11th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00091926
Researcher
Lara Wine lee

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Keywords
Cancer, Cancer/Skin, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Infant, Non-interventional, Pediatrics, Rare Diseases
Summary

The goal of the study is to characterize the features of Infantile Hemangiomas before and after treatment. Certain characteristics of the hemangioma can be seen more clearly with a closer and more resolute image of the lesion (abnormal vessels etc.). Developing a greater understanding of these characteristics? may help clinicians better predict the course of infantile hemangiomas in children.

Specific aim 1: to correlate images seen on dermoscopy with regression of the hemangioma.
Specific aim 2: to provide features that may help to predict a better response to treatment.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lara Wine Lee
8437922890
Winelee@musc.edu

Study to Understand Disease Course Inflammation and Endotype of South Carolinians with Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Save

Date Added
June 18th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00089284
Researcher
Bryan Garcia

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Keywords
Healthy Volunteer Studies, Infectious Diseases, Lung, Non-interventional, Pulmonary
Summary

The goal of this cohort and biorepository is to collect data and blood specimens on individuals with Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM), pulmonary disease, and healthy adults to better understand the illness and ultimately improve the care and survival of those with these conditions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Abigail Grady
843-792-2072
gradyabi@musc.edu

Collaborative, National Quality and Efficacy Registry for Tracking Disease Progression in Systemic Sclerosis (Scleroderma) Patients Save

Date Added
November 20th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00080285
Researcher
Faye Hant

List of Studies


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Keywords
Autoimmune disease, Non-interventional, Rare Diseases, Scleroderma, Skin
Summary

The goal of this study is to develop an early systemic sclerosis (SSc) registry in the United States (US). A registry is a group of patients that are observed over time. This is a non-interventional study, meaning that they are no study specific medications to take or procedures to undergo. The specific aims include ongoing assessment of the natural history of early SSc patients by capturing and analyzing clinical data, patient reported outcomes, and laboratory data. This is a multi-center study with sites spread across the U.S. This study is funded by the Scleroderma Research Foundation.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Trevor Faith
843-792-8997
faitht@musc.edu

Changes in Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter in Preeclamptic patients with Severe Features by Neurologic Criteria versus Diagnosis Without Neurologic Criteria, Compared to Controls. Save

Date Added
November 7th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00078977
Researcher
Mary Sterrett

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Keywords
Central Nervous System, Hypertension/ High Blood Pressure, Non-interventional, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pregnancy, Women's Health
Summary

Preeclamptic patients will have an ultrasound done of their eyes, to look at the size of the nerve behind the eye. We will also recruit women without preeclampsia to be a comparison group.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Mary Sterrett
8434940554
sterretm@musc.edu

VITROS® Immunodiagnostic Products hs Troponin I US Sample Collection Protocol Save

Date Added
May 8th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00076320
Researcher
Gary Headden

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Cardiovascular, Heart, Non-interventional
Summary

Roughly 8-10 million patients complaining of chest pain come to an Emergency Department (ED) annually in the United States. Quickly determining if you are having a heart attack is critical for improving your chances of survival. Cardiac troponin is a protein that is used as a biomarker (biological marker) to indicate damage to the heart muscle. Cardiac troponin lab tests that are currently used in the United States do not have the ability to detect low levels of troponin. There are more sensitive troponin tests that are primarily used outside the US, that are able to detect lower levels of cardiac troponin within 90-180 minutes instead of 5 or 6 hours. This allows for the early identification of individuals at a higher risk for heart damage and these patients benefit from early diagnosis and treatment. Delaying the treatment of a heart attack increases the chance of dying or being permanently disabled. This study will collect blood samples from people coming to the Emergency Department complaining of chest pain in order to measure this troponin lab test's ability to accurately detect troponin levels.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Robert Houck
843-792-3576
houckr@musc.edu

Investigating teleconsent to improve clinical research access in remote communities Save

Date Added
July 3rd, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00068715
Researcher
Jihad Obeid

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Healthy Volunteer Studies, Non-interventional
Summary

The objective of this proposal is to evaluate teleconsent, a novel telemedicine informed consent system, in order to study the advantages of teleconsent, the barriers to its adoption, and its impact on the informed consent process. The goal of this work is to improve the adoption of this technology and improve the overall research process, with reduction in travel burden on research participants and regulatory burden on clinical investigators. Facilitating enrollment into clinical trials will in turn accelerate the development of new treatments.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Nathan Wilson
843-792-8272
wilsonn@musc.edu

National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative (NPC-QIC) - A Collaborative Initiative to Improve Care of Children with Complex Congenital Heart Disease Save

Date Added
June 23rd, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00056522
Researcher
Frances Woodard

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Cardiovascular, Children's Health, Heart, Infant, Non-interventional
Summary

Transforming health care and outcomes for children with rare diseases is difficult within the current health care system. There is great variation in care delivery, inadequate and slow application of existing evidence, and ineffective use of available data to generate new knowledge. Individual care centers have inadequate numbers of patients for robust learning and improvement. In order to redesign the system, changes must take place at multiple levels, including the patient and family, clinician, practice and the network. The purpose of this project is to design, develop, and test further refinements to an improvement and research network focused on HLHS, the most severe congenital heart defect, and to use a registry to simultaneously improve clinical care, redesign care delivery systems and to conduct quality improvement, health services, outcomes, and comparative effectiveness research. The purpose of this initiative, specifically, is to improve care and outcomes for infants with HLHS by: 1) expanding the established NPC-QIC national registry to gather clinical care process, outcome, and developmental data on infants with HLHS between diagnosis and 12 months of age, 2) improving implementation of consensus standards, tested by teams, into everyday practice across pediatric cardiology centers, and 3) engaging parents as partners in improving care and outcomes. We utilize a quality improvement methodology, known as the adapted learning collaborative model, which expedites the implementation of tools and strategies that facilitate changes such as systematic care coordination, cardiovascular monitoring, and nutritional monitoring into every day practice. The NPC-QIC registry is used to document the impact of these changes on various care processes and outcomes (e.g., mortality rate, readmissions, and weight gain).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Frances Woodard
843-792-3292
klinefl@musc.edu

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Gullah Health (SLEIGH) Save

Date Added
October 5th, 2009
IRB Number
10852
Researcher
Diane Kamen

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Autoimmune disease, Children's Health, Environmental Factors, Ethnicity and Disease, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Immune System, Joint, Kidney, Lupus, Minorities, Non-interventional, Vitamin D, Women's Health
Summary

The Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) in Gullah Health, or SLEIGH, study is an observational study enrolling African Americans from the Sea Island communities of South Carolina and Georgia. We are enrolling patients, family members of patients, and unrelated community members. SLE is a potentially severe disease that can affect the entire body. SLE is more common in African Americans than Caucasians. The main purpose of this study is to find genes that, along with factors from the environment, result in the development of SLE. Volunteers in SLEIGH will be asked to answer questions about their health and have blood and urine collected for tests. After the first visit there may be one additional visit 2 or more years later. This is not a drug study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Marcie Pregulman
843-792-5290
pregulma@musc.edu

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