Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Trial RandOmizing Heparin Save

Date Added
September 26th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00051279
Researcher
Alejandro Spiotta
Keywords
Adolescents, Brain, Drug Studies, Men's Health, Minorities, Obesity, Pain, Stroke, Women's Health
Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine if giving the medicine ?heparin? intravenously (through the veins) continuously for up to 14 days to subjects after a brain aneurysm has burst will help improve the chances of subjects having a good recovery after the bleed compared to subjects who get routine brain aneurysm care (standard of care). Patients who get routine care would also get heparin, but they would typically get an overall lower dose and the heparin would be injected under the skin (heparin shot) instead of in the veins.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Amora Mayo-Perez
843-792-1737
mayoaper@musc.edu

Neural Determinants of Age-Related Change in Auditory-Visual Speech Processing Save

Date Added
September 24th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00070971
Researcher
James Dias
Keywords
Aging, Brain, Central Nervous System, Ears, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Hearing, Language, Minorities, Vision/ Eye
Summary

Older adults typically have trouble identifying the speech they hear, especially in noisy environments. Fortunately, compared to younger adults, older adults are better able to compensate for difficulties identifying the speech they hear by recruiting the visual system. However, the extent to which older adults can benefit from visual input, and how this influence relates to age-related changes in brain structure and function, have not been thoroughly investigated. The general purpose of this study is to determine how age-related changes in brain structure and function affect how well people hear and see. This study seeks participants with normal hearing to mild hearing loss, who also have normal or corrected-to-normal vision.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
James Dias
(843) 792-3921
diasj@musc.edu

Realistic measurements of tDCS-modulated activity and electric fields in the human brain in vivo Save

Date Added
September 19th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00069308
Researcher
Pratik Chhatbar
Keywords
Brain, Epilepsy, Nervous System
Summary

In this study, we will use electrodes implanted inside the skull and over the scalp to study the effect of non-invasive brain stimulation method called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). We will record changes in electric brain potentials and brain activity as a result of tDCS at both inside skull at scalp level. We will use this information to interpret how tDCS leads to changes inside the brain leading to changes the brain activity. This study will help us develop interventions that involve use of tDCS in a variety of disease conditions like stroke, depression, addiction, etc.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Fay Davis
843-792-0883
davisfa@musc.edu

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for smoking cessation in cancer patients Save

Date Added
September 5th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00066330
Researcher
Xingbao Li
Keywords
Brain, Cancer, Smoking
Summary

Cigarette smoking is a significant public health concern especially in cancer patients. rTMS has been investigated for smoking cessation in healthy smokers. This study will test the therapeutic benefits of rTMS for smoking cessation in cancer patients with smoking. Firstly, we will evaluate total number of smoke-free days during a 7-day quit attempt. Secondly, we will evaluate cigarette consumption and cue craving for smoking during the quit attempt period.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Xingbao Li
843-792-5729
lixi@musc.edu

Validation of computer-based saccade and pupillary light reflex measures as biomarkers for progressive supranuclear palsy Save

Date Added
July 18th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00065862
Researcher
Marian Dale
Keywords
Aging, Brain, Movement Disorders, Nervous System, Parkinsons, Rare Diseases, Vision/ Eye
Summary

This study examines eye movements and the pupil's response to light in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), comparing to Parkinson's disease and control subjects without neurological disease. Computerized measures of eye movements and pupil changes will be used. Subjects will also receive an eye exam to rule out other eye diseases. The goal of this study is to use subtle changes in eye movements and the pupil's response to light for earlier diagnosis of PSP.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Shonna Jenkins
843-792-9115
jenkisho@musc.edu

CENC Study 1: Observational Study on Late Neurologic Effects of OEF/OIF/OND Combat Save

Date Added
April 19th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00064999
Researcher
Clara Dismuke
Keywords
Brain
Summary

The study will examine clinical and economic outcomes associated with mild TBI. in the military and veterans.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Clara Dismuke
8438140085
clara.dismuke@va.gov

Transcranial magnetic stimulation as a treatment for seizures Save

Date Added
March 21st, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00063419
Researcher
Leonardo Bonilha
Keywords
Brain, Epilepsy
Summary

A seizure is a common sign or symptom characterized by abnormal electrical activity in the brain that affects about 10% of individuals in the population at some point in their lives. Although most are self-limited and transient, seizures sometimes fail to respond to medications and may even progress despite administration of medications. When these seizures are characterized by spread to both sides of the brain (become generalized), aggressive management with sedating medications is warranted. However, if seizures remain confined to one side of the brain (remain focal), the risks associated with high doses of sedating medications often outweighs the potential benefits of stopping the seizure. This has led to a search for other therapies that can more effectively target and control focal seizures without causing significant sedation, damage to other organs, or medication interactions. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is one such therapy that has shown promise in case series and case reports, although no clinical controlled trial has yet been published to validate its efficacy in patients with severe seizures. In addition, TMS has been shown to be safe for use in epilepsy and other disorders.

We aim to evaluate the efficacy of TMS in patients with severe seizures that are not controlled with medications.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aparna Choudhury
22845
choudhur@musc.edu

Validating Mobile Assessment Devices Save

Date Added
March 21st, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00064342
Researcher
Brett Froeliger
Keywords
Brain, Smoking, Substance Use
Summary

The purpose of this study is to examine the accuracy of wearable technology to detect and characterize smoking behavior. The study consists of one visit and will last approximately one hour. We are seeking adult (? 18 years old) male and female smokers to participate. Compensation is available for those that qualify.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lauren Hurst
843-882-7196
hurstla@musc.edu

Extinguishing Fear and Craving: Neuromodulating Shared Circuits Save

Date Added
March 7th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00064233
Researcher
Lisa Mcteague
Keywords
Alcohol, Anxiety, Brain, Depression
Summary

Individuals with anxiety disorders are approximately twice as likely as the general population to experience alcohol addiction and vice versa. The affinity toward addiction is especially high in the case of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Animal and human work has suggested that the neurocircuitry largely overlaps in both the expression and extinction of fear and craving. This study involves utilizing one session of non-invasive brain stimulation (repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation) to enhance extinction learning as measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging, in both healthy individuals and those with PTSD and alcohol addiction. While this is a single session study, the goal of this study is two identify promising new brain targets to be used therapeutically for individuals suffering from PTSD and alcohol addiction.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lisa McTeague
843-792-8274
mcteague@musc.edu

Cumulative dynamics of cortical excitability?and transcranial magnetic stimulation Save

Date Added
December 6th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00061339
Researcher
Leah Fryml
Keywords
Brain
Summary

We are studying the potential influence of non-invasive brain stimulation on the areas of the brain that control muscle movements. This study involves questionnaires, measurements of muscle movements with non-invasive electromyography (EMG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation. While we are looking for healthy volunteers, these findings could help us develop treatments for people struggling with anxiety and depression.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Leah Fryml
843-792-2123 x 15466
fryml@musc.edu

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