Neuroplasticity Associated with Extended Daily Use of a Sensorimotor Priming Vibration System to Improve Hand Function After Stroke Save

Date Added
March 5th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00086207
Researcher
Na jin Seo

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Aging, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The objective is to determine if continuous use of TheraBracelet in the home has a clinically meaningful effect in chronic stroke survivors. The study design is a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. We will enroll 40 chronic stroke survivors with moderate hand impairment. Subjects will be randomly assigned to the treatment or control group (n=20 per group). All subjects will wear the TheraBracelet device on the paretic wrist for 8 hours/day every day during their normal daily activity for 1 month. The device will deliver vibration (treatment) or no vibration (control). Double-blinding is possible because the treatment vibration is imperceptible (i.e., subthreshold). Measures of neural plasticity, the amount of the paretic arm use in daily living, clinical hand function, biomechanical grip control, and self-reported abilities for activities of daily living will be assessed at baseline, once a week during the month of wearing the device, and for 3-month follow-up, allowing determination of the efficacy and persistence.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Amanda Vatinno
843-792-8970
vatinno@musc.edu

TRANScranial direct current stimulation for POst-stroke motor Recovery - a phase II sTudy (TRANSPORT 2) Save

Date Added
February 25th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00083043
Researcher
Wuwei Feng

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

This research is being done to find out if brain stimulation combined with a rehabilitation therapy improves arm weakness as a result of having a stroke. The stimulation technique is called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). The treatment uses direct electrical currents to stimulate specific parts of the brain. The rehabilitation therapy is called "modified Constraint Induced Movement Therapy" (mCIMT). During this rehabilitation therapy study participants will wear a mitt on the hand of the arm that was not affected by their stroke. It is designed to restrain the use of the unaffected arm, while performing therapy with impaired one.
It is not known if brain stimulation combined with rehabilitation therapy will improve arm weakness. Study participants will receive rehabilitation therapy while on this study. Study participants may or may not receive the brain stimulation therapy.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Kelly Krajeck
843-792-0189
krajeck@musc.edu

Age-related changes in neuroplasticity impede recovery in post-stroke depression: a novel exercise and brain stimulation paradigm to prime neuroplastic potential Save

Date Added
December 4th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00083079
Researcher
Ryan Ross

List of Studies

Keywords
Brain, Depression, Exercise, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke affects millions of Americans and is a leading cause of disability. In addition to chronic disability, many survivors experience depressive symptoms such as reductions in mood and motivation. Post-stroke depression (PSD) is associated with poorer recovery from stroke, increased health care costs and higher mortality. Additionally, PSD may interfere with the recovery of the nervous system after stroke. Effective treatment options for PSD are limited and often come with side effects, highlighting the need for alternative treatment approaches. Aerobic exercise (AEx) has positive effects on the nervous system, is a powerful anti-depressant, and has limited side effects, yet remains underutilized in stroke survivors with PSD. This study will examine the short-term effects of AEx on the nervous system in stroke survivors with and without PSD. The results will serve as a foundation for the study of AEx as a treatment for PSD.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Ryan Ross
843-792-3477
rossre@musc.edu

Neuromodulation and Plasticity in Cognitive Control Neurocircuitry in Chronic Stroke Save

Date Added
November 6th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00083136
Researcher
Lisa Mcteague

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The goal of this pilot study is to determine whether a repetitive high-dose form of non-invasive brain stimulation is a promising and safe treatment for stroke-related cognitive difficulties. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an FDA approved treatment for depression, and is used commonly to treat people for their depression. In studies of rTMS for depression and other disorders, individuals have experienced improved cognitive function. Thus, we are testing here whether cognitive function in individuals with chronic stroke could be improved by rTMS.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lisa McTeague
843-792-8274
mcteague@musc.edu

A novel therapy + e-learning self-management program for stroke survivors Save

Date Added
October 31st, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00081749
Researcher
Michelle Woodbury

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke survivors with arm paresis because of stroke use their "good" arm for daily activities, but in doing so may be self-limiting their own recovery of the "bad" arm. Traditional models of stroke rehabilitation fail to fully engage the survivor and care partner(s) in actively planning post-discharge habits that improve their capacity to live well over their entire lives. This study will test a cutting-edge in-person therapy + online training program designed to progressively transfer the responsibility of driving post-stroke recovery from the therapist to the survivor.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Scott Hutchison
843-792-2712
hutchis@musc.edu

Incline Training to Personalize Motor Control Interventions after Stroke Save

Date Added
May 3rd, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00077797
Researcher
Mark Bowden

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Exercise, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke is the leading cause of disability, as many of those affected demonstrate difficulty with movement and
walking. Rehabilitation post-stroke can be challenging and often ineffective because no two stroke survivors
present with the same mobility impairments, yet the same physical therapy interventions are utilized. Thus, a need exists to personalize rehabilitation techniques to improve function and mobility post-stroke. The proposed innovative research will test a framework created to identify the most effective intervention based on a participant's specific motor control problems. We plan to study how self-selected walking speed is impacted by a four-week walking program that incorporates either walking on an inclined or declined treadmill compared to walking on a flat treadmill. We will determine the best intervention for each problem and identify predictors of response. Selecting the correct intervention for personalized motor control problems, as opposed to applying a one-size-fits-all strategy for rehabilitation, is likely to improve walking function in Veterans after stroke.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brian Cence
(843) 792-2668
cence@musc.edu

The Association between Arterial Stiffness and Cognitive Impairment Risk in non-stroke controls (TAASCIR) Save

Date Added
February 26th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00074521
Researcher
Joy Jones buie

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Brain, Cardiovascular, Hypertension/ High Blood Pressure, Minorities, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The purpose of this research study is to understand the association between heart and brain health in a population of 40-75 year olds. In this study, we will work to better understand blood vessel stiffness and brain function in African American and non-Hispanic white individuals. You will be asked to give blood during the study visit. Additional information will be obtained to help the researcher better understand the blood vessel and brain function data collected. There is only one study visit that last roughly 2 hours and compensation will be available.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Joy Jones Buie
8437926098
jonejn@musc.edu

AtRial Cardiopathy and Antithrombotic Drugs in prevention After cryptogenic stroke Save

Date Added
January 10th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00072371
Researcher
Christine Holmstedt

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Cardiovascular, Heart, Hypertension/ High Blood Pressure, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

ARCADIA is a multicenter, biomarker-driven, randomized, double-blind, active-control, phase 3 clinical trial of apixaban (Eliquis) versus aspirin in patients who have evidence of atrial cardiopathy and a recent stroke of unknown cause. 1100 subjects will be recruited over 2.5 years at 120 sites in the NINDS StrokeNet consortium. Subjects will be followed for a minimum of 1.5 years and a maximum of 4 years for the primary efficacy outcome of recurrent stroke and the primary safety outcomes of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and major hemorrhage other than intracranial hemorrhage.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Cheryl Grant
843-792-7118
grantche@musc.edu

Examining neural networks engaged during lower extremity movement in the MRI Save

Date Added
November 8th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00072777
Researcher
Colleen Hanlon

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Healthy Volunteer Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability in the United States and less than 50% of survivors regain independent ambulation. While lower extremity performance is a prime target of rehabilitation, little is known about patterns of neural function and structure which may influence, or be influenced by recovery of coordinated, lower extremity function. In this pilot study, we are developing a paradigm to measure lower extremity movement on brain function. Healthy controls and stroke patients will undergo 2 MRI scans wherein we will measure the brain activity associated with lower extremity movement.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jade Doolittle
843-792-1006
doolittj@musc.edu

Improving measurement and treatment of post-stroke neglect Save

Date Added
November 7th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00070974
Researcher
Emily Grattan

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke Recovery
Summary

After stroke, it is common for individuals to have difficulty attending to the affected side of their body or to the affected side of space (neglect). Rehabilitation therapists use many different clinical assessments to measure this inattention. However, it is unclear whether items from some of the most commonly used assessments are able to effectively and comprehensively measure inattention. Rehabilitation therapists use clinical assessments to inform treatment and document patient progress. Therefore, it is important that we examine these existing assessments.

Individuals with neglect frequently experience weakness in their arm/hand. This study also examines the effects of non-invasive brain stimulation (transcranial direct current stimulation) and arm/hand rehabilitation training (repetitive task-specific practice) on excitability in the brain, attention, and arm movement ability.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Emily Grattan
843-792-3435
grattan@musc.edu

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