A novel therapy + e-learning self-management program for stroke survivors Save

Date Added
October 31st, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00081749
Researcher
Michelle Woodbury

Silhouette
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke survivors with arm paresis because of stroke use their "good" arm for daily activities, but in doing so may be self-limiting their own recovery of the "bad" arm. Traditional models of stroke rehabilitation fail to fully engage the survivor and care partner(s) in actively planning post-discharge habits that improve their capacity to live well over their entire lives. This study will test a cutting-edge in-person therapy + online training program designed to progressively transfer the responsibility of driving post-stroke recovery from the therapist to the survivor.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Scott Hutchison
843-792-2712
hutchis@musc.edu

Incline Training to Personalize Motor Control Interventions after Stroke Save

Date Added
May 3rd, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00077797
Researcher
Mark Bowden

Silhouette
Keywords
Exercise, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke is the leading cause of disability, as many of those affected demonstrate difficulty with movement and
walking. Rehabilitation post-stroke can be challenging and often ineffective because no two stroke survivors
present with the same mobility impairments, yet the same physical therapy interventions are utilized. Thus, a need exists to personalize rehabilitation techniques to improve function and mobility post-stroke. The proposed innovative research will test a framework created to identify the most effective intervention based on a participant's specific motor control problems. We plan to study how self-selected walking speed is impacted by a four-week walking program that incorporates either walking on an inclined or declined treadmill compared to walking on a flat treadmill. We will determine the best intervention for each problem and identify predictors of response. Selecting the correct intervention for personalized motor control problems, as opposed to applying a one-size-fits-all strategy for rehabilitation, is likely to improve walking function in Veterans after stroke.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brian Cence
(843) 792-2668
cence@musc.edu

The Association between Arterial Stiffness and Cognitive Impairment Risk in non-stroke controls (TAASCIR) Save

Date Added
February 26th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00074521
Researcher
Joy Jones buie

Silhouette
Keywords
Brain, Cardiovascular, Hypertension/ High Blood Pressure, Minorities, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The purpose of this research study is to understand the association between heart and brain health in a population of 40-75 year olds. In this study, we will work to better understand blood vessel stiffness and brain function in African American and non-Hispanic white individuals. You will be asked to give blood during the study visit. Additional information will be obtained to help the researcher better understand the blood vessel and brain function data collected. There is only one study visit that last roughly 2 hours and compensation will be available.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Joy Jones Buie
8437926098
jonejn@musc.edu

Examining neural networks engaged during lower extremity movement in the MRI Save

Date Added
November 8th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00072777
Researcher
Colleen Hanlon

Silhouette
Keywords
Healthy Volunteer Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability in the United States and less than 50% of survivors regain independent ambulation. While lower extremity performance is a prime target of rehabilitation, little is known about patterns of neural function and structure which may influence, or be influenced by recovery of coordinated, lower extremity function. In this pilot study, we are developing a paradigm to measure lower extremity movement on brain function. Healthy controls and stroke patients will undergo 2 MRI scans wherein we will measure the brain activity associated with lower extremity movement.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jade Doolittle
843-792-1006
doolittj@musc.edu

Improving measurement and treatment of post-stroke neglect Save

Date Added
November 7th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00070974
Researcher
Emily Grattan

Silhouette
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke Recovery
Summary

After stroke, it is common for individuals to have difficulty attending to the affected side of their body or to the affected side of space (neglect). Rehabilitation therapists use many different clinical assessments to measure this inattention. However, it is unclear whether items from some of the most commonly used assessments are able to effectively and comprehensively measure inattention. Rehabilitation therapists use clinical assessments to inform treatment and document patient progress. Therefore, it is important that we examine these existing assessments.

Individuals with neglect frequently experience weakness in their arm/hand. This study also examines the effects of non-invasive brain stimulation (transcranial direct current stimulation) and arm/hand rehabilitation training (repetitive task-specific practice) on excitability in the brain, attention, and arm movement ability.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Emily Grattan
843-792-3435
grattan@musc.edu

Functional Assistance provided by Myoelectric Elbow-wrist-hand orthoses (FAME) Save

Date Added
February 21st, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00061939
Researcher
Michelle Woodbury

Silhouette
Keywords
Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

This study, for stroke survivors with partial paralysis of one arm, will test whether or not an arm exoskeleton (the MyoPro Motion-G) immediately impacts arm movement more than a regular brace or more than wearing no brace. A stroke survivor who is 1 year or more post-stroke will qualify for this study if he/she has at least a little movement in the more affected arm. Subjects who qualify will come to MUSC 4 times over 3 weeks for about 2-3 hours per visit. During that time subjects will be fit for, and learn how to operate the exoskeleton and the comparison brace. Subjects' arm movement will be tested with a series of standard clinical measures of dexterity, functional task performance, range of motion, and strength.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Michelle Woodbury
843-792-1671
WoodbuML@musc.edu

Center for the Study of Aphasia Recovery (C-STAR) - Project 1 (POLAR) Project 001: Modeling Treated Recovery from Aphasia Save

Date Added
November 9th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00058579
Researcher
Leonardo Bonilha

Silhouette
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Speech and language therapy for the management of aphasia (a language impairment that often occurs as a result of a stroke) is generally shown to be effective. However, the reasons that certain treatments may work for some individuals, and not others, and why some individuals do not respond to treatment is largely unknown. In this study, we plan to identify and model the relationship between many different factors (such as personal/biographical factors and an individual's baseline cognitive and language abilities) to help predict aphasia treatment outcome. Participants will be recruited for speech and language testing, brain imaging (MRI), and aphasia treatment (as warranted).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Anna Doyle
843-792-3678
doylean@musc.edu

Establishing the functional viability and dose-response of Duck, Duck Punch: A Stroke Rehabilitation Computer Game Save

Date Added
October 25th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00059924
Researcher
Michelle Woodbury

Silhouette
Keywords
Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

This study has 4 parts: In one part of this study, people with stroke will either play a custom designed computer game for stroke rehabilitation called Duck Duck Punch or an off the shelf computer game with their weaker arm 3 times per week for 6 weeks. Evaluations will determine whether or not one computer game improved arm movement more than the other. In the 2nd part of the study, people with stroke, caregivers of people with stroke and stroke rehabilitation therapists will meet in several focus groups to design a useful and informative Duck Duck Punch performance report. In the 3rd part of the study we will test the accuracy of the Duck Duck Punch tracking system. Finally, in the 4th part of the study, we will test a new online class to teach about how to carry on stroke rehabilitation after the therapy ends.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Michelle Woodbury
843-792-1671
WoodbuML@musc.edu

A novel mechanics-based intervention to improve post-stroke gait stability Save

Date Added
October 4th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00059390
Researcher
Jesse Dean

Silhouette
Keywords
Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

People who have experienced a stroke often have an increased risk of falling and decreased confidence in their balance, in part because of an inability to accurately place their feet while walking. Unfortunately, existing therapies have not been able to improve this problem. This study will test whether a novel therapy can improve foot placement accuracy during walking. Specifically, the therapy will involve repeated practice walking on a treadmill, while forces are applied to the legs to affect foot placement.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brian Cence
843-792-2668
cence@musc.edu

Examining the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation and task-specific practice on cortical modulation among individuals with unilateral spatial neglect post stroke Save

Date Added
July 5th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00056688
Researcher
Emily Grattan

Silhouette
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke Recovery
Summary

It is common for stroke survivors to have difficulty attending to the affected side of their body or to the affected side of space after stroke (unilateral neglect). Individuals with neglect frequently experience weakness in their arm/hand also. The purpose of this study is to test the effects of 3 different rehabilitation training sessions that combine non-invasive brain stimulation (transcranial direct current stimulation, tDCS) with arm/hand rehabilitation training (repetitive task-specific practice, RTP). This study is designed to determine the effects of tDCS + RTP on the excitability in the brain, attention to the affected side, and arm movement ability.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Emily Grattan
843-792-3435
grattan@musc.edu

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