Developing brain stimulation as a treatment for chronic pain in opiate dependent individuals Save

Date Added
July 3rd, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00078668
Researcher
Colleen Hanlon

Silhouette
Keywords
Brain, Drug Studies, Pain, Psychiatry
Summary

The purpose of this study is to develop transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a novel, non-pharmacologic approach to decreasing pain in individuals with chronic pain. This study will test whether rTMS over the prefrontal cortex can produce a reduction in your perception of pain, your desire to use opiates, and your brain's response to opiate cues. The results of this study will be used to design and develop a large clinical trial of rTMS as an innovative, new treatment option for chronic lower back pain in individuals that have used chronic opiates.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Julia Imperatore
843-792-5560
imperato@musc.edu

Activate For Life: A nurse delivered hybrid telehealth/mHealth aging in place intervention to address pain and fatigue in low-income older adults Save

Date Added
June 5th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00076835
Researcher
Kathryn Vanravenstein

Silhouette
Keywords
Aging, Chronic Fatigue, Exercise, Pain
Summary

The overall goal of this feasibility study is to test an individualized, nurse-led behavioral health program that leverages home telehealth technology to directly teach low and fixed income older adults residing in the community to reduce their pain and fatigue by improving mobility through strength and balance training in the context of a complementary mental health intervention to address motivation and social support. Specifically, the integrated intervention includes components to address (1) balance and fall prevention (Otago), (2) strengthening and mindfulness (Yoga), and importantly, (3) affective state and social support which are crucial to maintaining motivation (Behavioral Activation). Moreover, these 3 best practices interventions will be enhanced by integrating physical activity data tracking to complement self-report measures, the former of which will be available in real time for patient and provider review, with parameter violations (eg, non-activity during scheduled activity time; overall activity level lower for a set period of time) triggering brief telehealth sessions to address any problems. Finally, participant qualitative feedback will be captured through voice/video recorded diaries focusing on experienced pain, fatigue, sleep, personal reactions to the project and physical activity as well as technology issues they may encounter.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Kathryn VanRavenstein
843-792-3054
vanraven@musc.edu

Is overprescribing opioids a problem in 3rd molar extraction cases? Save

Date Added
December 27th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00070753
Researcher
Kevin Schwartzman
Keywords
Pain, Surgery
Summary

This study will be conducted in order to address the possible issue of opioid overprescription in extractions of third molars. Oral surgeons will be surveyed to determine their prescribing patterns. Patients will be surveyed 7 days after the procedure to evaluate their experience with the medication.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Kevin Schwartzman
3018029805
schwarke@musc.edu

Comparison of 0.1 and 0.05mg intrathecal morphine when administered with a multimodal pain regimen for post-cesarean analgesia: a single center, prospective, randomized, single-blinded trial. Save

Date Added
December 19th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00072393
Researcher
Kathryn Bridges

Silhouette
Keywords
Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pain, Surgery
Summary

This study will compare 0.1mg and 0.05mg of spinal morphine for postoperative pain after scheduled, elective Cesarean delivery. All patients will receive a spinal anesthetic (single injection in the lower back to numb patients from the waist down) for operative anesthesia and will be
randomized into one of two groups: (group 1) 0.1mg spinal morphine and (group 2) 0.05mg spinal morphine. This will be a randomized, single blinded study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Wanda Jones
843-792-1869
joneswr@musc.edu

Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Trial RandOmizing Heparin Save

Date Added
September 26th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00051279
Researcher
Alejandro Spiotta

Silhouette
Keywords
Adolescents, Brain, Drug Studies, Men's Health, Minorities, Obesity, Pain, Stroke, Women's Health
Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine if giving the medicine "heparin" intravenously (through the veins) continuously for up to 14 days to subjects after a brain aneurysm has burst will help improve the chances of subjects having a good recovery after the bleed compared to subjects who get routine brain aneurysm care (standard of care). Patients who get routine care would also get heparin, but they would typically get an overall lower dose and the heparin would be injected under the skin (heparin shot) instead of in the veins.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Amora Mayo-Perez
843-792-1737
mayoaper@musc.edu

Online Pain Management Program for Parents of Preschool-Age Children with Sickle Cell Disease: A Pilot Study Save

Date Added
December 1st, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00055478
Researcher
Jeffrey Schatz
Keywords
Blood Disorders, Pain
Summary

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic blood disorder present at birth characterized by painful vaso-occlusive episodes. Pain episodes typically result in approximately one to two severe pain crises requiring hospitalization per year along with another ten pain episodes managed at home. Pain crises can emerge as early as six to twelve months and most children with the most common form of the disease (HbSS), experience a pain episode requiring hospital care by the age of five years. Promoting better coping with pain in preschool age children likely requires additional adaptation of methods and consideration of a developmental framework. Very young children have limited coping skills, a limited ability to communicate pain, and it is up to the primary caregiver to correctly interpret and treat the pain that a child may be experiencing. Despite the frequency of painful episodes early in life in SCD, there has been little work to-date addressing pain management in young children with SCD. Management of pain episodes early in life by parents may be an important developmental context for later child and family coping with pain, as well as coping with other aspects of this chronic health condition. Consequently, the current study will target parents of preschool age children with SCD through an online video-based platform in order to teach pain management skills to help to identify and manage SCD-related pain episodes.

Institution
Palmetto
Recruitment Contact
Kelsey Smith
803-563-7931
smithk88@email.sc.edu

The effects of electroacupuncture on pain and shoulder range of motion (ROM) in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Save

Date Added
August 16th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00053521
Researcher
Emily Darr

Silhouette
Keywords
Pain
Summary

This research study is designed to examine the effects of a single treatment of electroacupuncture (EA) on shoulder pain and range of motion in patients who have ben diagnosed with shoulder impingement syndrome. Patients with shoulder impingement syndrome will be recruited from orthopedic and physical therapy offices in Charleston, SC. If they are determined to be eligible for the study, the patients will receive informed consent. If the patient chooses to participate in the study, they will have their shoulder pain and range of motion in their shoulder assessed. The patient will then receive one treatment of EA. EA is a roughly 15 minute acupuncture-like procedure where thin needles (about the diameter of a thick human hair) will be placed in the muscle tissue surrounding your shoulder. A small electric current will be applied to the needles while they are inserted. Generally, acupuncture does not hurt. Some people feel the needles as they go in, and some people feel nothing Following the treatment, the patient will have their shoulder pain and range of motion assessed again.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Emily Darr
(843) 792-1414
darr@musc.edu

A Novel Approach to Reduce Pain, Prescription Opioid Use & Misuse in Pregnancy Save

Date Added
March 1st, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00052361
Researcher
Constance Guille

Silhouette
Keywords
Pain, Pregnancy
Summary

Pregnant women using prescription opioid medication (pain medications) are invited to take part in a program for the reduction of pain and prescription opioid misuse.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Edie Douglas
843-792-0403
douglaed@musc.edu

RELIEF A Global Registry to Evaluate the Long-Term Effectiveness of Neurostimulation Therapy for Pain Save

Date Added
October 27th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00044796
Researcher
Michael Hillegass

Silhouette
Keywords
Pain
Summary

This is a registry to investigate the outcomes of participants with commercially available Boston Scientific neurostimulators for pain. This study will also assess the economic value and technical performance of these devices for pain.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Wanda Jones
843-792-1869
joneswr@musc.edu

Discontinuation From Chronic Opioid Therapy For Pain Using a Buprenorphine Taper Save

Date Added
September 1st, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00046473
Researcher
Kelly Barth

Silhouette
Keywords
Drug Studies, Fibromyalgia, Joint, Pain, Substance Use
Summary

Chronic opioid therapy for pain can be associated with significant risks, and a significant number of patients maintained on chronic opioids have continued pain and/or poor functioning. When patients need to or want to come off their opioid pain medications, there is little to guide physicians as to how to best help them do so, and it is not known how patients do after coming off opioid medications. The goals of this study are (1) to evaluate two medications in assisting patients in coming off their opioid pain medications and (2) determining outcomes after discontinuing opioids.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Kayla Whaley
843-792-0684
whaley@musc.edu

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