The Influence of Mental States on Anticipation and Processing of Emotional Information Save

Date Added
March 24th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00094001
Researcher
Danielle Taylor

List of Studies

Keywords
Brain, Mental Health
Summary

In this study we are interested in how attention is influenced by thinking styles. The study will take 2 hours. If you agree to participate, you will be asked to complete questionnaires. Then sensors will be attached that measure brain activity and other body responses (e.g., heart rate). While these are attached we will ask you to complete a thought task followed by an image viewing task. Sometimes loud noises may be played during the task. Because we will be measuring brain activity, we ask that you come to the study with clean, dry hair. Wetness in the hair will influence the brain activity that we gather.

There are no known risks to completing this study, but you may experience some mild discomfort while discussing some topics in the questionnaire portion of the study and while viewing some of the images.
There are no direct benefits to you, but this study may provide an opportunity to learn more about procedures involved in psychological research, and will help inform our understanding of how emotion affects attention.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Danielle Taylor
6166486793
taydanie@musc.edu

Targeting Parenting to Prevent HIV and Substance Use Among Trauma-Exposed Youth: A Mixed-Methods Needs Assessment Save

Date Added
March 16th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00096161
Researcher
Nada Goodrum

List of Studies

Keywords
Adolescents, Alcohol, HIV / AIDS, Mental Health, Psychiatry, Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI), Substance Use
Summary

Many adolescents experience traumatic events, such as child abuse, physical or sexual assault, or witnessing violence. Teens who experience trauma are more likely to have problems with substance use and risky sexual activity. We want to understand how parents can support their teens and help keep them safe after traumatic events.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Nada Goodrum
843-792-8067
goodrumn@musc.edu

Investigating Reward and Affective Neurocircuitry as a Link between Maternal Co-Occurring Substance Use Disorders/Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Adverse Family Outcomes Save

Date Added
February 18th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00091359
Researcher
Kathleen Crum

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Adolescents, Alcohol, Children's Health, Mental Health, Non-interventional, Psychiatry, Smoking, Stress Disorders, Substance Use, Women's Health
Summary

The project will study how substance abuse and traumatic events are related to how mothers and children respond to rewards, and how they interact with each other. Participating mothers and children will complete tasks in an MRI scanner, questionnaires, and a social behavior task.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Kathleen Crum
843-792-7709
crumk@musc.edu

CBT-I Targeting Co-morbid Insomnia in Patients Receiving rTMS for Treatment-Resistant Major Depressive Disorder Save

Date Added
January 22nd, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00089725
Researcher
Michael Norred

List of Studies

Keywords
Depression, Mental Health, Psychiatry, Sleep Disorders
Summary

Depression and insomnia occur together in a substantial number of patients. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is an effective treatment for depression, but does not help insomnia symptoms in depressed patients. A form of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been developed that specifically helps with insomnia (CBT-I). We will give CBT-I to patients who are being treated with TMS for depression, who also have insomnia, to determine if it helps insomnia symptoms.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Michael Norred
8438701181
norredm@musc.edu

Intelligent Biometrics to Optimize Prolonged Exposure for PTSD- Clinical Trial Save

Date Added
January 7th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00094890
Researcher
Sudie Back

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Mental Health, Military, Psychiatry, Stress Disorders
Summary

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating mental health condition that increases suicide risk and affects up to 20% of military veterans and 8% of the general population. Prolonged Exposure (PE) is an effective and proven form of talk therapy for PTSD. However, dropout rates are high (25-30%) and an estimated one-third of patients who complete PE still report symptoms of PTSD at the end of treatment. This study directly addresses these limitations by using a clinical trial to evaluate the ability of an innovative technology system to improve Prolonged Exposure (PE) therapy for veterans with PTSD.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Stacey Sellers
843-792-5807
sellersst@musc.edu

Spectral correlates of impulsivity in patients with traumatic brain injury: A study of the effect of transcranial electrical stimulation of the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex on response inhibition Save

Date Added
November 19th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00093356
Researcher
Nathan Rowland

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Brain, Mental Health, Psychiatry, Rehabilitation Studies
Summary

Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) is a non-invasive form of brain stimulation that has previously been to shown to have therapeutic potential in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. In this study, we will use a brain activity monitor (electroencephalogram, EEG) and a computer-based task to observe the effects of different forms of tES, like transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial pulsed current stimulation (tPCS), on impulse control and sustained attention in people with TBI. Additionally, we will measure how much tDCS and tPCS affect the brain activity of a specific area of the brain associated with impulse control and attention. Problems with response inhibition have been shown to make rehabilitation more difficult for people with TBI. It also reduces social functioning and can also negatively affect job performance, which ultimately lead to a decreased quality of life. A better understanding of the effects of tES in TBI patients could be informative in finding out what its therapeutic potential is for this population.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Dominika Pullmann
843-329-9777
pullmann@musc.edu

A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Study to Evaluate the Efficacy of Ketamine for the Treatment of Concurrent Opioid Use Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder Save

Date Added
November 5th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00091292
Researcher
Jennifer Jones

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Depression, Mental Health, Psychiatry, Substance Use
Summary

The purpose of the study is to examine whether an investigational medication called ketamine, which comes in the form of a nasal spray, is able to improve treatment outcomes for concurrent opioid addiction and depression when used in conjunction with buprenorphine treatment. Study medications will be delivered twice per week for four weeks. If you are eligible and you decide to enroll in the study, your participation will last approximately 8 weeks, or 2 months.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jennifer Jones
(843) 792-5594
jonjen@musc.edu

tDCS-Augmented Prolonged Exposure Therapy for PTSD: A Multiple Baseline Within-Subject Clinical Trial Save

Date Added
November 5th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00093774
Researcher
Adam Cobb

List of Studies

Keywords
Depression, Mental Health, Military, Nervous System, Psychiatry, Stress Disorders, Substance Use
Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of a brain stimulation technique known as transcranial direct current stimulation, or tDCS, on the benefits of Prolonged Exposure therapy, or PE, which is an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. tDCS has been demonstrated to be safe and effective for influencing brain activity by passing a weak electrical current through the scalp. In this study, tDCS is provided in addition to PE treatment, through the National Crime Victim's Research and Treatment Center at MUSC, or the PTSD Clinical Team Clinic within the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Adam Cobb
843-792-7688
cobbad@musc.edu

tDCS Combined with a Brief Cognitive Intervention to Reduce Perioperative Pain and Opioid Requirements in Veterans Save

Date Added
October 1st, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00091450
Researcher
Jeffrey Borckardt

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Brain, Joint, Mental Health, Military, Pain, Psychiatry, Surgery
Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine whether a new medical technology can help reduce post-operative total knee or hip pain when combined with a Cognitive-Behavioral intervention (CBI).

This new medical technology, is called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), it uses a very small amount of electricity to temporarily stimulate specific areas of the brain thought to be involved in pain reduction. The electrical current passes through the skin, scalp, hair, and skull and requires no additional medication, sedation, or needles.

This study will investigate the effects of tDCS, the Cognitive-Behavioral (CB) intervention and their combination on pain among veterans following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA). You may benefit in the form of decreased pain and opioid requirements following your knee or hip replacement surgery. However, benefit is only likely if you are randomized to one of the 3 (out of 4) groups.

This study hopes to determine the effects of these interventions and their combined effect on post-operative pain, opioid use and functioning during the 48-hour post-operative period following a total knee or hip replacement.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Georgia Mappin
(843) 789-7104
georgia.mappin@va.gov

Assessing Mental Health Resources in U.S. Trauma Centers for Families Affected by Pediatric Traumatic Injury Save

Date Added
September 27th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00091869
Researcher
Leigh Ridings

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Children's Health, Depression, Mental Health, Pediatrics, Surgery
Summary

Pediatric traumatic injury (PTI) ? defined as unintentional injury requiring hospitalization and, often, extended periods of physical and emotional recovery ? is experienced by 300,000 children in the U.S. annually. Roughly 20-40% of children and caregivers develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or depression following PTI, yet most U.S. trauma centers fail to provide even basic mental health screening post-injury. It is critical to advance our knowledge of available mental health services in trauma centers for this frequently overlooked population to accelerate their physical and emotional recovery. In this project, trauma center providers across the U.S. will complete a survey and a qualitative interview to assess their current protocols and resources available to screen and treat children and families' mental health in the aftermath of PTI, as well as their opinions regarding feasibility of implementing protocols to better address the emotional health recovery within this population.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Leigh Ridings
843-792-5146
ridingle@musc.edu

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