TheraBracelet: The first and only wearable to instantly improve stroke hand function Save

Date Added
January 3rd, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00062471
Researcher
Na jin Seo
Keywords
Aging, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Post-stroke hand impairment is highly prevalent and severely restricts functional ability and independence. Yet, there is no assistive device to help hand function at home, every day, during activities of daily living. This study addresses this gap by providing an innovative technology. The ?TheraBracelet? is a wristband applying imperceptible white-noise vibration to skin. TheraBracelet is efficacious, as it has been shown to immediately improve chronic stroke survivors? touch sensation and hand dexterity in preliminary studies. TheraBracelet is affordable by using only a low-cost vibrator. TheraBracelet is also translational, because a vibrator strategically placed at the wrist does not interfere with dexterous finger motions, and it is low-risk by involving only imperceptible vibration on skin. These practicalities assure easy adoption in home environment for large impact on sensorimotor impairment. This study is to determine the feasibility and safety of using this assistive device all day every day for a month during daily activity, and to determine if TheraBracelet?s instant effects are sustained during prolonged use. This objective will be accomplished in a double-blinded, randomized, controlled, crossover design study. Feasibility (compliance of using the device everyday) and safety will be assessed for the treatment condition compared to the control condition (wearing the device without vibration) through weekly evaluations. In addition, TheraBracelet?s instant benefits in improving hand function will be assessed weekly. Persistence of TheraBracelet?s instant benefits across all weekly evaluations will support durability (i.e. desensitization to vibration does not occur during extended daily use over a one-month period). This project is expected to lead to an assistive wristband that increases hand function during activities of daily living, thus increasing independence and quality of life and reducing caregiver burden for a large number of stroke survivors with hand impairment.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Andrew Fortune
843-792-8970
fortunea@musc.edu

Operant conditioning of spinal reflexes in healthy people and people with neurological disorders. Save

Date Added
November 23rd, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00060769
Researcher
Richard Segal
Keywords
Body Composition, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Our long term goal is to enhance the locomotion of impaired individuals after a neurological injury.
We are trying to recruit as healthy control participants, and neurologically impaired individuals (incomplete SCI and after-stroke patients) to participate in this study.
For neurologically impaired individuals a physical therapist will complete IRB approved questionnaires to measure your mobility, muscle strength, balance, walking speed, and distance.
All participants will meet with study staff who would then test your reflexes by placing some superficial skin based electrodes behind the knee and apply mild stimulation while standing/sitting.
If enrolled, you may be required to participate for 30 sessions (3 sessions/week), each lasting about one hour over a period of 3 months. Compensation is available for your participation.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aviroop Dutt-Mazumder
843-792-0275
duttamaz@musc.edu

S.C.O.P.E. Systematic Collection and Objective Progressive Exercise Save

Date Added
November 16th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00057398
Researcher
Mark Bowden
Keywords
Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

We have designed a comprehensive, evidence-based approach to physical therapy rehabilitation after stroke that focuses on the intensity of cardiovascular, strength, and gait training, standardizing the dosage and progression of each type of training. Implementation of this standardization of intensity protocol will be guided via an internet-based (REDCap) interactive program available to each treating therapist. This program will cue the therapist to complete two sessions of cardiovascular, strength, and gait training each week at the appropriate intensity while not being prescriptive about specific activities to meet the stated goals. Eighty individuals with stroke (20 each from Charleston, SC; Anderson, SC; Rock Hill, SC; and York, PA ) who meet inclusion and exclusion criteria and will undergo a standardized evaluation at admission and discharge assessing gait speed, endurance, strength, balance, and overall functional independence and will be compared to 80 individuals with stroke receiving usual care. In addition, each enrollee will participate in a telephone screen at 90 days post-stroke to assess participation, quality of life, falls efficacy, falls history, and stroke-related secondary health conditions/readmissions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Eric Monsch
(843) 792-0275
monsch@musc.edu

Looseners versus Tighteners: Histopathology Analysis of Arthrofibrosis in Total Knee Replacement (TKA) Save

Date Added
November 3rd, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00052283
Researcher
Vincent Pellegrini
Keywords
Aging, Arthritis, Bone, Joint, Pain, Physical Therapy
Summary

All primary total knee replacement patients will undergo the surgical procedure per the surgeon's standard technique. Samples of tissue that is ordinarily removed and discarded as a part of the procedure will be sent to the pathology lab, where the pathologist will prepare and stain the tissue sample to assess for levels of a specific protein thought to be a marker for the likelihood of the soft tissues to form dense versus loose scar tissue. We will then follow each patient's postoperative course to determine if levels of the protein in question, alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA) correlate with outcomes. Outcomes will include postoperative pain, range of motion, as well as patient-reported satisfaction and function scores.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Monica Baczko
843-792-8169
baczko@musc.edu

The effects of impaired post-stroke coordination and motor pathway integrity on mobility performance Save

Date Added
November 6th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00048394
Researcher
Steven Kautz
Keywords
Healthy Volunteer Studies, Military, Muscle, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Walking is important to persons who have had a stroke and better rehabilitation methods are needed to restore or improve their walking. This project will investigate ways to improve upon and diagnose the specific underlying impairments. Future work will allow clinicians, such as physicians and physical therapists, to make measurements in their clinic to better diagnose a person?s specific walking deficit, design a specific treatment plan, and monitor its ability to restore or improve the person?s walking.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Landi Wilson
843-792-9013
Wilsolan@musc.edu

Excitatory and Inhibitory rTMS as Mechanistic Contributors to Walking Recovery Save

Date Added
March 4th, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00032252
Researcher
Mark Bowden
Keywords
Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

Individuals with chronic stroke (greater than 6 months post-stroke) will be evaluated to assess the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on walking function. Contributors to walking such as lesion size and location, brain activation, strength, force production during walking, and biomechanical variables will also be assessed. Each individual will be examined with excitatory, inhibitory and sham stimulation to assess the effects on the above variables. In addition, each type of stimulation will be combined with a walking rehabilitation program to determine the affect of adding rehabilitation. Each participant will be requested to undergo 8 sessions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aaron Embry
843-792-8198
embry@musc.edu

Assessment of Contributions to Impaired Walking after Neurologic Injury Save

Date Added
January 15th, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00028941
Researcher
Mark Bowden
Keywords
Brain, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Muscle, Nerve, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

Rehabilitation interventions including resistance training, functional and task-specific therapy, and gait or locomotor training have been shown to be successful in improving motor function in individuals with neurologic disease or injury. Recent investigations conducted in our laboratory indicate that intense resistance training coupled with task-specific functional training lead to significant gains in functional motor recovery. Similarly, gait rehabilitation involving intense treadmill training and/or task-specific locomotor training has been shown to be effective in improving locomotor ability. However, the underlying neural adaptations associated with these therapeutic approaches are not well understood. Our primary goal is to understand the motor control underpinnings of neurologic rehabilitation in order to apply this knowledge to future generations of therapeutic interventions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aaron Embry
843-792-8198
embry@musc.edu

Augmentation of Locomotor Adaptation Post-Stroke Save

Date Added
March 6th, 2012
PRO Number
Pro00016060
Researcher
Mark Bowden
Keywords
Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

This project will evaluate two different methods of normalizing the center of mass acceleration (COMa) in individuals post-stroke, specifically focusing on rates and pattern of recovery to analyze walking-specific adaptations as precursors to motor learning. In addition, the proposed project seeks to establish the optimal configuration of electrodes to activate neural circuits involved in post-stroke locomotion. Once the better method of training COMa and optimal parameters of electrode placement for tDCS are identified, we will evaluate the effects of tDCS on locomotor adaptations during single sessions and over a five-day training period.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aaron Embry
843.792.8198
embry@musc.edu

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