Concomitant sensory stimulation during therapy to enhance hand functional recovery post stroke Save

Date Added
August 6th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00090790
Researcher
Na jin Seo

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Aging, Exercise, Movement Disorders, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Hand disability after stroke has a profound negative impact on functional ability and independence. Hand therapy may be augmented with sensory stimulation for better outcomes. We have developed a novel sensory stimulation - unfelt vibration applied via a wristwatch. In this study, we will determine if combining this stimulation with hand task practice is superior to hand task practice alone.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Na Jin Seo
8437920084
seon@musc.edu

Novel training environment to normalize altered finger force direction post stroke Save

Date Added
June 6th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00088988
Researcher
Na jin Seo

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Exercise, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine if 3-dimensional finger force training is an effective tool in restoring hand function post stroke. Persons who survived a stroke 3 to 9 months ago and have a hand impairment will be eligible to participate in this study. Participants will be asked to come to the laboratory to practice controlling the finger force generation 3 times a week for 6 weeks. Participants will see their performance on a computer screen. Participants will also come to the laboratory for additional 4-7 visits for assessments of their upper extremity function. The total duration of the study will be 2.5 months.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Na Jin Seo
8437920084
seon@musc.edu

Development of Wearable Stimulation App to Increase Hand Functional Recovery in Patients with Neurological Movement Save

Date Added
June 4th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00088976
Researcher
Na jin Seo

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Aging, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Post-stroke hand impairment diminishes stroke survivors' ability to perform activities of daily living. Motor recovery has been shown to improve through peripheral sensory stimulation. This study aims to determine if vibration from a smartwatch improves post-stroke hand function.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Andrew Fortune
843-792-8970
fortunea@musc.edu

Remote Delivery of an Exercise Program during Post-Stroke Community Reintegration ? A Pilot Study Save

Date Added
June 4th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00089218
Researcher
Addie Middleton

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Exercise, Physical Therapy, Stroke Recovery
Summary

In-person delivery of structured, progressive home exercise programs during the subacute phase of stroke recovery has documented efficacy; however, in-person programs are resource-intensive and not economically sustainable. Advancements in telehealth are opening new avenues for efficient and scalable delivery of services. We will examine "tele" delivery of an important component of post-stroke care, exercise during community reintegration.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Addie Middleton
843-792-0235
middlja@musc.edu

Neuroplasticity Associated with Extended Daily Use of a Sensorimotor Priming Vibration System to Improve Hand Function After Stroke Save

Date Added
March 5th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00086207
Researcher
Na jin Seo

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Aging, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The objective is to determine if continuous use of TheraBracelet in the home has a clinically meaningful effect in chronic stroke survivors. The study design is a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. We will enroll 40 chronic stroke survivors with moderate hand impairment. Subjects will be randomly assigned to the treatment or control group (n=20 per group). All subjects will wear the TheraBracelet device on the paretic wrist for 8 hours/day every day during their normal daily activity for 1 month. The device will deliver vibration (treatment) or no vibration (control). Double-blinding is possible because the treatment vibration is imperceptible (i.e., subthreshold). Measures of neural plasticity, the amount of the paretic arm use in daily living, clinical hand function, biomechanical grip control, and self-reported abilities for activities of daily living will be assessed at baseline, once a week during the month of wearing the device, and for 3-month follow-up, allowing determination of the efficacy and persistence.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Amanda Vatinno
843-792-8970
vatinno@musc.edu

Utilizing a Structured Communication Tool as a Method to Decrease Patient Falls Save

Date Added
October 31st, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00080596
Researcher
Georgina Lucas

List of Studies

Keywords
Aging, Bone, Geriatrics, Inflammation, Joint, Pain, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Surgery
Summary

This study seeks to identify the impact of structured communication between Registered nurses (RNs) and Unlicensed Assistive Personnel (UAP) to decrease the fall rate and number of injurious falls on a Medical-Surgical unit. A seven item tool addressing fall risks (pocket card) will be utilized to communicate fall risks on admission, at hand off of care, and every 4 hrs.

Institution
Palmetto
Recruitment Contact
Carol Tuten
803-665-4234
carol.tuten@palmettohealth.org

Measurement of gait mechanics and movement in the lower extremity amputee Save

Date Added
October 30th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00082064
Researcher
Aaron Embry

List of Studies

Keywords
Exercise, Movement Disorders, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies
Summary

Walking after a lower extremity amputation is often difficult. It is important that researchers and clinicians understand the mechanisms that inhibit normal walking function. In this study, we are recruiting individuals with lower extremity limb loss for a walking and balance investigation. We will also be studying matched healthy controls to do similar study procedures. All study procedures will occur on the campus of MUSC by a licensed Physical Therapist and experienced researcher. Any questions should be directed to the coordinator listed.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aaron Embry
843-792-8198
embry@musc.edu

Promoting Physical Activity via Physical Therapist Following Knee Replacement Save

Date Added
October 5th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00081254
Researcher
Christine Pellegrini

List of Studies

Keywords
Exercise, Joint, Physical Therapy
Summary

This study aims to examine a physical therapist led physical activity intervention on physical activity levels in knee replacement patients after surgery. The study plans to examine changes in physical activity, physical function, and pain in patients over a 12 week period of time after receiving knee replacement.

Institution
Palmetto
Recruitment Contact
Nicholas Mook
803-777-9236
nmook@email.sc.edu

Incline Training to Personalize Motor Control Interventions after Stroke Save

Date Added
May 3rd, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00077797
Researcher
Mark Bowden

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Exercise, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke is the leading cause of disability, as many of those affected demonstrate difficulty with movement and
walking. Rehabilitation post-stroke can be challenging and often ineffective because no two stroke survivors
present with the same mobility impairments, yet the same physical therapy interventions are utilized. Thus, a need exists to personalize rehabilitation techniques to improve function and mobility post-stroke. The proposed innovative research will test a framework created to identify the most effective intervention based on a participant's specific motor control problems. We plan to study how self-selected walking speed is impacted by a four-week walking program that incorporates either walking on an inclined or declined treadmill compared to walking on a flat treadmill. We will determine the best intervention for each problem and identify predictors of response. Selecting the correct intervention for personalized motor control problems, as opposed to applying a one-size-fits-all strategy for rehabilitation, is likely to improve walking function in Veterans after stroke.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brian Cence
(843) 792-2668
cence@musc.edu

Excitatory and Inhibitory rTMS as Mechanistic Contributors to Walking Recovery Save

Date Added
March 4th, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00032252
Researcher
Mark Bowden

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

Individuals with chronic stroke (greater than 6 months post-stroke) will be evaluated to assess the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on walking function. Contributors to walking such as lesion size and location, brain activation, strength, force production during walking, and biomechanical variables will also be assessed. Each individual will be examined with excitatory, inhibitory and sham stimulation to assess the effects on the above variables. In addition, each type of stimulation will be combined with a walking rehabilitation program to determine the affect of adding rehabilitation. Each participant will be requested to undergo 8 sessions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brian Cence
843-792-2668
cence@musc.edu

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