Assessment of Contributions to Impaired Walking after Neurologic Injury

Date Added
January 15th, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00028941
Researcher
Mark Bowden

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Muscle, Nerve, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

Rehabilitation interventions including resistance training, functional and task-specific therapy, and gait or locomotor training have been shown to be successful in improving motor function in individuals with neurologic disease or injury. Recent investigations conducted in our laboratory indicate that intense resistance training coupled with task-specific functional training lead to significant gains in functional motor recovery. Similarly, gait rehabilitation involving intense treadmill training and/or task-specific locomotor training has been shown to be effective in improving locomotor ability. However, the underlying neural adaptations associated with these therapeutic approaches are not well understood. Our primary goal is to understand the motor control underpinnings of neurologic rehabilitation in order to apply this knowledge to future generations of therapeutic interventions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brian Cence
843-792-2668
cence@musc.edu

Registry for Stroke Recovery

Date Added
September 16th, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00037803
Researcher
Robert Adams

List of Studies


Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

RESTORE is a database of individuals who are interested in being contacted about future stroke research at the Medical University of South Carolina. Included in the database is health information and characteristics about the individual's health, stroke, and their recovery. The results of other stroke recovery studies the individual participates in at MUSC will also be in the database. The database and information included will lead to better and more targeted recruitment for stroke recovery projects.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Holly Boggan
843-792-1598
bogganhl@musc.edu

Operant down-conditioning of the soleus H-reflex in spastic hemiparesis after stroke

Date Added
October 6th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00048307
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies


Keywords
Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

Reflexes are important parts of our movements. When reflexes are not working well, movements are clumsy or even impossible. After stroke, reflex responses may change. Researchers have found that people can learn to increase or decrease a reflex response with training. Recently, we have found that rats and people with partial spinal cord injuries can walk better after they are trained to change a spinal cord reflex. Thus, learning to change a reflex response may help people recover after a nervous system injury. In this study, we aim to examine whether learning to change a spinal reflex through operant conditioning training can improve movement function recovery in people after stroke or other damage to the nervous system.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Examining the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation and task-specific practice on cortical modulation among individuals with unilateral spatial neglect post stroke

Date Added
July 5th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00056688
Researcher
Emily Grattan

List of Studies


Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke Recovery
Summary

It is common for stroke survivors to have difficulty attending to the affected side of their body or to the affected side of space after stroke (unilateral neglect). Individuals with neglect frequently experience weakness in their arm/hand also. The purpose of this study is to test the effects of 3 different rehabilitation training sessions that combine non-invasive brain stimulation (transcranial direct current stimulation, tDCS) with arm/hand rehabilitation training (repetitive task-specific practice, RTP). This study is designed to determine the effects of tDCS + RTP on the excitability in the brain, attention to the affected side, and arm movement ability.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Emily Grattan
843-792-3435
grattan@musc.edu

Center for the Study of Aphasia Recovery (C-STAR) - Project 1 (POLAR) Project 001: Modeling Treated Recovery from Aphasia

Date Added
November 9th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00058579
Researcher
Leonardo Bonilha

List of Studies


Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Speech and language therapy for the management of aphasia (a language impairment that often occurs as a result of a stroke) is generally shown to be effective. However, the reasons that certain treatments may work for some individuals, and not others, and why some individuals do not respond to treatment is largely unknown. In this study, we plan to identify and model the relationship between many different factors (such as personal/biographical factors and an individual's baseline cognitive and language abilities) to help predict aphasia treatment outcome. Participants will be recruited for speech and language testing, brain imaging (MRI), and aphasia treatment (as warranted).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Anna Doyle
843-792-3678
doylean@musc.edu

Improving measurement and treatment of post-stroke neglect

Date Added
November 7th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00070974
Researcher
Emily Grattan

List of Studies


Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke Recovery
Summary

After stroke, it is common for individuals to have difficulty attending to the affected side of their body or to the affected side of space (neglect). Rehabilitation therapists use many different clinical assessments to measure this inattention. However, it is unclear whether items from some of the most commonly used assessments are able to effectively and comprehensively measure inattention. Rehabilitation therapists use clinical assessments to inform treatment and document patient progress. Therefore, it is important that we examine these existing assessments.

Individuals with neglect frequently experience weakness in their arm/hand. This study also examines the effects of non-invasive brain stimulation (transcranial direct current stimulation) and arm/hand rehabilitation training (repetitive task-specific practice) on excitability in the brain, attention, and arm movement ability.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Emily Grattan
843-792-3435
grattan@musc.edu

AtRial Cardiopathy and Antithrombotic Drugs in prevention After cryptogenic stroke

Date Added
January 10th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00072371
Researcher
Christine Holmstedt

List of Studies


Keywords
Cardiovascular, Heart, Hypertension/ High Blood Pressure, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

ARCADIA is a multicenter, biomarker-driven, randomized, double-blind, active-control, phase 3 clinical trial of apixaban (Eliquis) versus aspirin in patients who have evidence of atrial cardiopathy and a recent stroke of unknown cause. 1100 subjects will be recruited over 6 years at 120 sites in the NINDS StrokeNet consortium. Subjects will be followed for a minimum of 1.5 years and a maximum of 7 years for the primary efficacy outcome of recurrent stroke and the primary safety outcomes of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and major hemorrhage other than intracranial hemorrhage.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Vicki Streets
843-792-8606
streetsv@musc.edu

Incline Training to Personalize Motor Control Interventions after Stroke

Date Added
May 3rd, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00077797
Researcher
Mark Bowden

List of Studies


Keywords
Exercise, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke is the leading cause of disability, as many of those affected demonstrate difficulty with movement and
walking. Rehabilitation post-stroke can be challenging and often ineffective because no two stroke survivors
present with the same mobility impairments, yet the same physical therapy interventions are utilized. Thus, a need exists to personalize rehabilitation techniques to improve function and mobility post-stroke. The proposed innovative research will test a framework created to identify the most effective intervention based on a participant's specific motor control problems. We plan to study how self-selected walking speed is impacted by a four-week walking program that incorporates either walking on an inclined or declined treadmill compared to walking on a flat treadmill. We will determine the best intervention for each problem and identify predictors of response. Selecting the correct intervention for personalized motor control problems, as opposed to applying a one-size-fits-all strategy for rehabilitation, is likely to improve walking function in Veterans after stroke.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brian Cence
(843) 792-2668
cence@musc.edu

Post-stroke Optimization of Walking using Explosive Resistance: Concurrent effects on Depression

Date Added
August 7th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00077223
Researcher
Chris Gregory

List of Studies


Keywords
Depression, Exercise, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

Depression contributes directly to disability following a stroke and is the single strongest predictor of quality of life. Treatment of depressive symptoms is associated with better functional recovery and return to activities of daily living. Resistance training can effectively improve post-stroke mobility and has the potential to serve as an alternative (non-drug) anti-depressant treatment option. The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of resistance training on post-stroke depressive symptoms.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Landi Wilson
843-792-9013
wilsolan@musc.edu

A novel therapy + e-learning self-management program for stroke survivors

Date Added
October 31st, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00081749
Researcher
Michelle Woodbury

List of Studies


Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke survivors with arm paresis because of stroke use their "good" arm for daily activities, but in doing so may be self-limiting their own recovery of the "bad" arm. Traditional models of stroke rehabilitation fail to fully engage the survivor and care partner(s) in actively planning post-discharge habits that improve their capacity to live well over their entire lives. This study will test a cutting-edge in-person therapy + online training program designed to progressively transfer the responsibility of driving post-stroke recovery from the therapist to the survivor.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Scott Hutchison
843-792-2712
hutchis@musc.edu



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