Effects of Oxytocin on Alcohol Craving and Intimate Partner Aggression Save

Date Added
May 3rd, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00054689
Researcher
Julianne Hellmuth

List of Studies


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Keywords
Alcohol, Drug Studies, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Mental Health, Psychiatry
Summary

Alcohol use disorders (AUD) and intimate partner aggression (IPA) frequently co-occur. There are significant health and economic burdens associated with AUD and co-occurring IPA, and little empirical data to guide treatment efforts. The neuropeptide oxytocin may help mitigate both AUD and IPA. However, clinical data examining oxytocin's effects on human aggression is scant. The proposed study is designed to address these gaps in the literature by utilizing a human laboratory paradigm to test the effects of oxytocin on craving and aggression among couples with AUD and co-occurring IPA.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Charli Kirby
843-300-9577
Kirbych@musc.edu

10 days of medial prefrontal cortex theta burst stimulation (MPFC cTBS) as a tool to improve clinical outcomes and decrease frontal-striatal reactivity to cues among treatment-engaged cocaine users Save

Date Added
October 6th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00046438
Researcher
Colleen Hanlon

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Brain, Drug Studies, Psychiatry, Substance Use
Summary

The goal of this pilot study is to determine if, in treatment-seeking substance dependent individuals, ten sessions of continuous theta burst transcranial magnetic brain stimulation (cTBS) over a brain region involved in craving (medial prefrontal cortex) can lower an individual's craving and brain response to drug-related cues. This study involves a screening visit, followed by one MRI visit, followed by ten cTBS treatment visits on consecutive days. There will be three follow-up MRI visits: the first will immediately follow completion of a 28-day outpatient treatment program, while the second and third will be one month and two months post-treatment.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Julia Imperatore
843-792-5560
imperato@musc.edu

Neural substrates of emotion: Impact of cocaine dependence Save

Date Added
December 2nd, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00039699
Researcher
Aimee Mc Rae

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Drug Studies, Psychiatry, Stress Disorders, Substance Use
Summary

Social stress often leads to drug craving and relapse in cocaine-dependent populations. Currently there are no FDA approved medications for the treatment of cocaine dependence. Therefore, biomedical research studies aimed at investigating the brain mechanisms responsible for controlling emotional responses to social stress could have a significant impact on the development of effective therapeutic treatment strategies for cocaine-dependent individuals.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lisa Nunn
792-0476
jenkinli@musc.edu

Treatment of Prolonged Grief Disorder in Combat Veterans Save

Date Added
September 2nd, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00036533
Researcher
Ronald Acierno

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Anxiety, Depression, Mental Health, Military, Psychiatry
Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of an innovative treatment for Prolonged Grief Disorder (PGD) compared to the current treatment most commonly offered to Veterans with PGD. Veterans will receive either Behavioral Activation and Therapeutic Exposure for Grief (BATE-G) or Cognitive Restructuring and Supportive Grief Counseling. Both treatments will be delivered in 7 sessions, and Veterans will have the option of receiving some or all of the treatment via telehealth. All participants will asked to complete follow up assessments 1 week, 3 and 6 months post treatment. The proposed project addresses the need for a Veteran/military specific treatment of PGD, and uses technology to deliver this treatment in a format that is far more likely to be accepted by military personnel and Veterans. This study will impact clinical practice by providing the first evidence for effective treatment of PGD in Veterans.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Stephanie Hart
(843) 789-6519
zeigls@musc.edu

Do You Really Expect Me to get MST Care in a VA Where Everyone is Male? Innovative Delivery of Evidence Based Psychotherapy to Women with Military Sexual Trauma Save

Date Added
June 2nd, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00034989
Researcher
Ronald Acierno

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Mental Health, Military, Psychiatry
Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine whether a scientifically validated treatment for PTSD called Prolonged Exposure (PE) can be delivered effectively to Veterans with Military Sexual Trauma (MST) related PTSD using videoconferencing technology, which allows a therapist and patient who are not in the same room as one another to communicate. We are interested in learning if this form of mental health service delivery is an acceptable alternative to traditional face-to-face therapy delivered with the therapist in the same room as the patient. This study is being conducted at the Charleston VA Medical Center, surrounding Community-Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOCs), and the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). It will involve approximately 125 female participants.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Stephanie Hart
843-789-6519
zeigls@musc.edu

Development of the Sleep Research Data Repository (SRDR) Save

Date Added
March 1st, 2011
PRO Number
Pro00009339
Researcher
Thomas Uhde

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Anxiety, Genetics, Mental Health, Psychiatry, Sleep Disorders, Stress Disorders
Summary

The Sleep Research Data Repository (SRDR) aimed to systematically collect, analyze and store for future research sleep and sleep disorders related biological and psychological information. It will include sleep physiological measurements and the results of interviews, questionnaires, and laboratory tests. The SRDR will contain sleep related information obtained from healthy subjects and patients with psychiatric, substance abuse, neurological disorders, or any medical conditions associated with sleep disturbances. SRDR data will be made available to current and future IRB-approved investigators associated with this protocol.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Richard Simmons
843-792-7439
simmr@musc.edu

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