Novel training environment to normalize altered finger force direction post stroke Save

Date Added
June 6th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00088988
Researcher
Na jin Seo

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Exercise, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine if 3-dimensional finger force training is an effective tool in restoring hand function post stroke. Persons who survived a stroke 3 to 9 months ago and have a hand impairment will be eligible to participate in this study. Participants will be asked to come to the laboratory to practice controlling the finger force generation 3 times a week for 6 weeks. Participants will see their performance on a computer screen. Participants will also come to the laboratory for additional 4-7 visits for assessments of their upper extremity function. The total duration of the study will be 2.5 months.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Na Jin Seo
8437920084
seon@musc.edu

Development of Wearable Stimulation App to Increase Hand Functional Recovery in Patients with Neurological Movement Save

Date Added
June 4th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00088976
Researcher
Na jin Seo

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Aging, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Post-stroke hand impairment diminishes stroke survivors' ability to perform activities of daily living. Motor recovery has been shown to improve through peripheral sensory stimulation. This study aims to determine if vibration from a smartwatch improves post-stroke hand function.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Andrew Fortune
843-792-8970
fortunea@musc.edu

Optimization of Closed-loop Transcutaneous Auricular Vagus Nerve Stimulation (taVNS) as a Neurorehabilitation Tool Save

Date Added
April 2nd, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00086291
Researcher
Bashar Badran

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

This study explores the use of a new form of neuromodulation known as transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (taVNS) which stimulates the ear. This stimulation will be delivered concurrently with upper limb motor rehabilitation training (3 days/week for 4 weeks) in chronic stroke patients. Patients will undergo a series of baseline assessments (including a brain scan), a 4-week course of motor rehabilitation, and post-assessments (including a second brain scan).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Morgan Dancy
843-792-6076
maddoxm@musc.edu

Neuroplasticity Associated with Extended Daily Use of a Sensorimotor Priming Vibration System to Improve Hand Function After Stroke Save

Date Added
March 5th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00086207
Researcher
Na jin Seo

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Aging, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The objective is to determine if continuous use of TheraBracelet in the home has a clinically meaningful effect in chronic stroke survivors. The study design is a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. We will enroll 40 chronic stroke survivors with moderate hand impairment. Subjects will be randomly assigned to the treatment or control group (n=20 per group). All subjects will wear the TheraBracelet device on the paretic wrist for 8 hours/day every day during their normal daily activity for 1 month. The device will deliver vibration (treatment) or no vibration (control). Double-blinding is possible because the treatment vibration is imperceptible (i.e., subthreshold). Measures of neural plasticity, the amount of the paretic arm use in daily living, clinical hand function, biomechanical grip control, and self-reported abilities for activities of daily living will be assessed at baseline, once a week during the month of wearing the device, and for 3-month follow-up, allowing determination of the efficacy and persistence.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Amanda Vatinno
843-792-8970
vatinno@musc.edu

TRANScranial direct current stimulation for POst-stroke motor Recovery - a phase II sTudy (TRANSPORT 2) Save

Date Added
February 25th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00083043
Researcher
Michelle Woodbury

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

This research is being done to find out if brain stimulation combined with a rehabilitation therapy improves arm weakness as a result of having a stroke. The stimulation technique is called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). The treatment uses direct electrical currents to stimulate specific parts of the brain. The rehabilitation therapy is called "modified Constraint Induced Movement Therapy" (mCIMT). During this rehabilitation therapy study participants will wear a mitt on the hand of the arm that was not affected by their stroke. It is designed to restrain the use of the unaffected arm, while performing therapy with impaired one.
It is not known if brain stimulation combined with rehabilitation therapy will improve arm weakness. Study participants will receive rehabilitation therapy while on this study. Study participants may or may not receive the brain stimulation therapy.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Kelly Krajeck
843-792-0189
krajeck@musc.edu

A novel therapy + e-learning self-management program for stroke survivors Save

Date Added
October 31st, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00081749
Researcher
Michelle Woodbury

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke survivors with arm paresis because of stroke use their "good" arm for daily activities, but in doing so may be self-limiting their own recovery of the "bad" arm. Traditional models of stroke rehabilitation fail to fully engage the survivor and care partner(s) in actively planning post-discharge habits that improve their capacity to live well over their entire lives. This study will test a cutting-edge in-person therapy + online training program designed to progressively transfer the responsibility of driving post-stroke recovery from the therapist to the survivor.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Scott Hutchison
843-792-2712
hutchis@musc.edu

Utilizing a Structured Communication Tool as a Method to Decrease Patient Falls Save

Date Added
October 31st, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00080596
Researcher
Georgina Lucas

List of Studies

Keywords
Aging, Bone, Geriatrics, Inflammation, Joint, Pain, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Surgery
Summary

This study seeks to identify the impact of structured communication between Registered nurses (RNs) and Unlicensed Assistive Personnel (UAP) to decrease the fall rate and number of injurious falls on a Medical-Surgical unit. A seven item tool addressing fall risks (pocket card) will be utilized to communicate fall risks on admission, at hand off of care, and every 4 hrs.

Institution
Palmetto
Recruitment Contact
Carol Tuten
803-665-4234
carol.tuten@palmettohealth.org

Measurement of gait mechanics and movement in the lower extremity amputee Save

Date Added
October 30th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00082064
Researcher
Aaron Embry

List of Studies

Keywords
Exercise, Movement Disorders, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies
Summary

Walking after a lower extremity amputation is often difficult. It is important that researchers and clinicians understand the mechanisms that inhibit normal walking function. In this study, we are recruiting individuals with lower extremity limb loss for a walking and balance investigation. We will also be studying matched healthy controls to do similar study procedures. All study procedures will occur on the campus of MUSC by a licensed Physical Therapist and experienced researcher. Any questions should be directed to the coordinator listed.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aaron Embry
843-792-8198
embry@musc.edu

PHOENIX: Development of a Spinal Cord Injury Peer-Supported Self-Management Intervention Save

Date Added
August 8th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00071526
Researcher
Susan Newman

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

The purpose of this research study is to determine if it is helpful to provide a peer-supported, health promotion intervention, known as PHOENIX, for people with spinal cord injury using telehealth. An additional purpose of this research is to test if PHOENIX has an effect on community participation, quality of life, and prevention of secondary conditions, such as pressure injuries and urinary tract infections, in people with spinal cord injury. Participants in PHOENIX will complete a 16-week spinal cord injury self-management program using iPads, provided by the study, to access online educational content and participate in video visits (weekly for the first 8 weeks, then every other week for the last 8 weeks) with a peer mentor who also has a spinal cord injury. There are 12 video visits in total and each visit will take about 1 hour. Participants will also be asked to complete a series of questionnaires several times while enrolled in the study. Participants will also be asked to take part in a group discussion or an interview to provide feedback on the PHOENIX program at the end of the study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lisa Heidelberg
843-792-7309
heidelbe@musc.edu

Post-stroke Optimization of Walking using Explosive Resistance: Concurrent effects on Depression Save

Date Added
August 7th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00077223
Researcher
Chris Gregory

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Depression, Exercise, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

Depression contributes directly to disability following a stroke and is the single strongest predictor of quality of life. Treatment of depressive symptoms is associated with better functional recovery and return to activities of daily living. Resistance training can effectively improve post-stroke mobility and has the potential to serve as an alternative (non-drug) anti-depressant treatment option. The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of resistance training on post-stroke depressive symptoms.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Landi Wilson
843-792-9013
wilsolan@musc.edu

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