A novel therapy + e-learning self-management program for stroke survivors Save

Date Added
October 31st, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00081749
Researcher
Michelle Woodbury

Silhouette
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke survivors with arm paresis because of stroke use their "good" arm for daily activities, but in doing so may be self-limiting their own recovery of the "bad" arm. Traditional models of stroke rehabilitation fail to fully engage the survivor and care partner(s) in actively planning post-discharge habits that improve their capacity to live well over their entire lives. This study will test a cutting-edge in-person therapy + online training program designed to progressively transfer the responsibility of driving post-stroke recovery from the therapist to the survivor.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Scott Hutchison
843-792-2712
hutchis@musc.edu

Measurement of gait mechanics and movement in the lower extremity amputee Save

Date Added
October 30th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00082064
Researcher
Aaron Embry
Keywords
Exercise, Movement Disorders, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies
Summary

Walking after a lower extremity amputation is often difficult. It is important that researchers and clinicians understand the mechanisms that inhibit normal walking function. In this study, we are recruiting individuals with lower extremity limb loss for a walking and balance investigation. We will also be studying matched healthy controls to do similar study procedures. All study procedures will occur on the campus of MUSC by a licensed Physical Therapist and experienced researcher. Any questions should be directed to the coordinator listed.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aaron Embry
843-792-8198
embry@musc.edu

PHOENIX: Development of a Spinal Cord Injury Peer-Supported Self-Management Intervention Save

Date Added
August 8th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00071526
Researcher
Susan Newman

Silhouette
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

The purpose of this research study is to determine if it is helpful to provide a peer-supported, health promotion intervention, known as PHOENIX, for people with spinal cord injury using telehealth. An additional purpose of this research is to test if PHOENIX has an effect on community participation, quality of life, and prevention of secondary conditions, such as pressure injuries and urinary tract infections, in people with spinal cord injury. Participants in PHOENIX will complete a 16-week spinal cord injury self-management program using iPads, provided by the study, to access online educational content and participate in video visits (weekly for the first 8 weeks, then every other week for the last 8 weeks) with a peer mentor who also has a spinal cord injury. There are 12 video visits in total and each visit will take about 1 hour. Participants will also be asked to complete a series of questionnaires several times while enrolled in the study. Participants will also be asked to take part in a group discussion or an interview to provide feedback on the PHOENIX program at the end of the study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lisa Heidelberg
843-792-7309
heidelbe@musc.edu

Post-stroke Optimization of Walking using Explosive Resistance: Concurrent effects on Depression Save

Date Added
August 7th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00077223
Researcher
Chris Gregory

Silhouette
Keywords
Depression, Exercise, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

Depression contributes directly to disability following a stroke and is the single strongest predictor of quality of life. Treatment of depressive symptoms is associated with better functional recovery and return to activities of daily living. Resistance training can effectively improve post-stroke mobility and has the potential to serve as an alternative (non-drug) anti-depressant treatment option. The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of resistance training on post-stroke depressive symptoms.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Landi Wilson
843-792-9013
wilsolan@musc.edu

Incline Training to Personalize Motor Control Interventions after Stroke Save

Date Added
May 3rd, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00077797
Researcher
Mark Bowden

Silhouette
Keywords
Exercise, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke is the leading cause of disability, as many of those affected demonstrate difficulty with movement and
walking. Rehabilitation post-stroke can be challenging and often ineffective because no two stroke survivors
present with the same mobility impairments, yet the same physical therapy interventions are utilized. Thus, a need exists to personalize rehabilitation techniques to improve function and mobility post-stroke. The proposed innovative research will test a framework created to identify the most effective intervention based on a participant's specific motor control problems. We plan to study how self-selected walking speed is impacted by a four-week walking program that incorporates either walking on an inclined or declined treadmill compared to walking on a flat treadmill. We will determine the best intervention for each problem and identify predictors of response. Selecting the correct intervention for personalized motor control problems, as opposed to applying a one-size-fits-all strategy for rehabilitation, is likely to improve walking function in Veterans after stroke.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brian Cence
(843) 792-2668
cence@musc.edu

Transcranial magnetic stimulation for modulation of postural control in progressive supranuclear palsy Save

Date Added
April 17th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00076691
Researcher
Marian Dale

Silhouette
Keywords
Central Nervous System, Geriatrics, Movement Disorders, Nervous System, Rare Diseases, Rehabilitation Studies
Summary

This research studies the effects of brain stimulation (transcranial magnetic stimulation, or "TMS") on balance in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The purpose of this research is to look for improvements in balance when subjects are on a tilting platform after stimulating the brain with a magnetic wand held over the scalp over an area at the back of the brain called the cerebellum. Participants will receive both active and inactive stimulation during the course of the study. There is no surgery involved. There are also optional portions of the study that include functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRIs) and speaking samples.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Shonna Jenkins
843-792-9115
jenkisho@musc.edu

Functional Electrical Stimulation Assisted Cycling in Persons Who Have Experienced a Stroke Save

Date Added
February 3rd, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00075399
Researcher
Chris Gregory

Silhouette
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

The goal of this study is to improve FES-cycling which is a common therapy. We will test a new method of adjusting the FES intensity to maintain a constant pedaling speed. We are looking for participants 18-75 years old who experienced a stroke more than 3 months ago. The study will last a single session.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Landi Wilson
843-792-9013
Wilsonlan@musc.edu

Improving measurement and treatment of post-stroke neglect Save

Date Added
November 7th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00070974
Researcher
Emily Grattan

Silhouette
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke Recovery
Summary

After stroke, it is common for individuals to have difficulty attending to the affected side of their body or to the affected side of space (neglect). Rehabilitation therapists use many different clinical assessments to measure this inattention. However, it is unclear whether items from some of the most commonly used assessments are able to effectively and comprehensively measure inattention. Rehabilitation therapists use clinical assessments to inform treatment and document patient progress. Therefore, it is important that we examine these existing assessments.

Individuals with neglect frequently experience weakness in their arm/hand. This study also examines the effects of non-invasive brain stimulation (transcranial direct current stimulation) and arm/hand rehabilitation training (repetitive task-specific practice) on excitability in the brain, attention, and arm movement ability.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Emily Grattan
843-792-3435
grattan@musc.edu

The Effects of Theta-Burst Stimulation Duration on Human Motor Cortex Excitability Save

Date Added
August 1st, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00068775
Researcher
Colleen Hanlon

Silhouette
Keywords
Psychiatry, Rehabilitation Studies
Summary

The study will use a new method for non-invasively examining the brain called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). TMS involves placing a coil of wire above the scalp and intermittently passing a very powerful current through it. This current produces energy in the form of a magnetic field that passes through the scalp. The magnetic field, in turn, induces a much weaker electrical current in the brain, causing the neurons directly under the coil to activate for a brief period of time. The U.S. Federal Drug Administration has approved TMS as a method for treating depression since 2008. By using TMS, we can evaluate how well your brain is controlling one of your hand or leg muscles. One way to measure this is by recording activity via electrodes on the hand opposite the side of the brain being stimulated. For example we will be stimulating on the left side of the brain and recording from electrodes on your right hand. In this study we are determining the effects of different types of repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) protocols on hand movement. rTMS means that the magnetic pulses are applied consecutively, and at a specified pace- the frequency. The specific type of rTMS you will receive is called "theta-burst stimulation" (TBS). TBS is characterized by a specific frequency of stimulation.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
John Henderson
792-5560
henderjs@musc.edu

Center for the Study of Aphasia Recovery (C-STAR) - Project 1 (POLAR) Project 001: Modeling Treated Recovery from Aphasia Save

Date Added
November 9th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00058579
Researcher
Leonardo Bonilha

Silhouette
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Speech and language therapy for the management of aphasia (a language impairment that often occurs as a result of a stroke) is generally shown to be effective. However, the reasons that certain treatments may work for some individuals, and not others, and why some individuals do not respond to treatment is largely unknown. In this study, we plan to identify and model the relationship between many different factors (such as personal/biographical factors and an individual's baseline cognitive and language abilities) to help predict aphasia treatment outcome. Participants will be recruited for speech and language testing, brain imaging (MRI), and aphasia treatment (as warranted).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Anna Doyle
843-792-3678
doylean@musc.edu

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