The Effects of Theta-Burst Stimulation Duration on Human Motor Cortex Excitability Save

Date Added
August 1st, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00068775
Researcher
Colleen Hanlon
Keywords
Psychiatry, Rehabilitation Studies
Summary

The study will use a new method for non-invasively examining the brain called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). TMS involves placing a coil of wire above the scalp and intermittently passing a very powerful current through it. This current produces energy in the form of a magnetic field that passes through the scalp. The magnetic field, in turn, induces a much weaker electrical current in the brain, causing the neurons directly under the coil to activate for a brief period of time. The U.S. Federal Drug Administration has approved TMS as a method for treating depression since 2008. By using TMS, we can evaluate how well your brain is controlling one of your hand or leg muscles. One way to measure this is by recording activity via electrodes on the hand opposite the side of the brain being stimulated. For example we will be stimulating on the left side of the brain and recording from electrodes on your right hand. In this study we are determining the effects of different types of repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) protocols on hand movement. rTMS means that the magnetic pulses are applied consecutively, and at a specified pace- the frequency. The specific type of rTMS you will receive is called ?theta-burst stimulation? (TBS). TBS is characterized by a specific frequency of stimulation.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
John Henderson
792-5560
henderjs@musc.edu

An International, Multicentre, Prospective, Single-Arm Study to Assess the Effect on Voluntary Movements of AbobotulinumtoxinA 1500 U Administered in Both Upper and Lower Limbs in Conjunction with a Guided Self-Rehabilitation Contract in Adult Subjects with Spastic Hemiparesis Save

Date Added
January 24th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00062911
Researcher
Wuwei Feng
Keywords
Drug Studies, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The purpose of this clinical study is to see whether injections of AbobotulinumtoxinA in the upper limb (arm) and lower limb (leg) in combination with a personal exercise plan can improve voluntary movements in subjects with hemiparesis.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Fay Davis
843-792-0883
davisfa@musc.edu

TheraBracelet: The first and only wearable to instantly improve stroke hand function Save

Date Added
January 3rd, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00062471
Researcher
Na jin Seo
Keywords
Aging, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Post-stroke hand impairment is highly prevalent and severely restricts functional ability and independence. Yet, there is no assistive device to help hand function at home, every day, during activities of daily living. This study addresses this gap by providing an innovative technology. The ?TheraBracelet? is a wristband applying imperceptible white-noise vibration to skin. TheraBracelet is efficacious, as it has been shown to immediately improve chronic stroke survivors? touch sensation and hand dexterity in preliminary studies. TheraBracelet is affordable by using only a low-cost vibrator. TheraBracelet is also translational, because a vibrator strategically placed at the wrist does not interfere with dexterous finger motions, and it is low-risk by involving only imperceptible vibration on skin. These practicalities assure easy adoption in home environment for large impact on sensorimotor impairment. This study is to determine the feasibility and safety of using this assistive device all day every day for a month during daily activity, and to determine if TheraBracelet?s instant effects are sustained during prolonged use. This objective will be accomplished in a double-blinded, randomized, controlled, crossover design study. Feasibility (compliance of using the device everyday) and safety will be assessed for the treatment condition compared to the control condition (wearing the device without vibration) through weekly evaluations. In addition, TheraBracelet?s instant benefits in improving hand function will be assessed weekly. Persistence of TheraBracelet?s instant benefits across all weekly evaluations will support durability (i.e. desensitization to vibration does not occur during extended daily use over a one-month period). This project is expected to lead to an assistive wristband that increases hand function during activities of daily living, thus increasing independence and quality of life and reducing caregiver burden for a large number of stroke survivors with hand impairment.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Andrew Fortune
843-792-8970
fortunea@musc.edu

Operant conditioning of spinal reflexes in healthy people and people with neurological disorders. Save

Date Added
November 23rd, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00060769
Researcher
Richard Segal
Keywords
Body Composition, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Our long term goal is to enhance the locomotion of impaired individuals after a neurological injury.
We are trying to recruit as healthy control participants, and neurologically impaired individuals (incomplete SCI and after-stroke patients) to participate in this study.
For neurologically impaired individuals a physical therapist will complete IRB approved questionnaires to measure your mobility, muscle strength, balance, walking speed, and distance.
All participants will meet with study staff who would then test your reflexes by placing some superficial skin based electrodes behind the knee and apply mild stimulation while standing/sitting.
If enrolled, you may be required to participate for 30 sessions (3 sessions/week), each lasting about one hour over a period of 3 months. Compensation is available for your participation.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aviroop Dutt-Mazumder
843-792-0275
duttamaz@musc.edu

S.C.O.P.E. Systematic Collection and Objective Progressive Exercise Save

Date Added
November 16th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00057398
Researcher
Mark Bowden
Keywords
Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

We have designed a comprehensive, evidence-based approach to physical therapy rehabilitation after stroke that focuses on the intensity of cardiovascular, strength, and gait training, standardizing the dosage and progression of each type of training. Implementation of this standardization of intensity protocol will be guided via an internet-based (REDCap) interactive program available to each treating therapist. This program will cue the therapist to complete two sessions of cardiovascular, strength, and gait training each week at the appropriate intensity while not being prescriptive about specific activities to meet the stated goals. Eighty individuals with stroke (20 each from Charleston, SC; Anderson, SC; Rock Hill, SC; and York, PA ) who meet inclusion and exclusion criteria and will undergo a standardized evaluation at admission and discharge assessing gait speed, endurance, strength, balance, and overall functional independence and will be compared to 80 individuals with stroke receiving usual care. In addition, each enrollee will participate in a telephone screen at 90 days post-stroke to assess participation, quality of life, falls efficacy, falls history, and stroke-related secondary health conditions/readmissions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Eric Monsch
(843) 792-0275
monsch@musc.edu

Center for the Study of Aphasia Recovery (C-STAR) - Project 1 (POLAR) Project 001: Modeling Treated Recovery from Aphasia Save

Date Added
November 9th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00058579
Researcher
Leonardo Bonilha
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Speech and language therapy for the management of aphasia (a language impairment that often occurs as a result of a stroke) is generally shown to be effective. However, the reasons that certain treatments may work for some individuals, and not others, and why some individuals do not respond to treatment is largely unknown. In this study, we plan to identify and model the relationship between many different factors (such as personal/biographical factors and an individual's baseline cognitive and language abilities) to help predict aphasia treatment outcome. Participants will be recruited for speech and language testing, brain imaging (MRI), and aphasia treatment (as warranted).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Katie Murphy
843-792-3678
murka@musc.edu

Examining the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation and task-specific practice on cortical modulation among individuals with unilateral spatial neglect post stroke Save

Date Added
July 5th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00056688
Researcher
Emily Grattan
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke Recovery
Summary

It is common for stroke survivors to have difficulty attending to the affected side of their body or to the affected side of space after stroke (unilateral neglect). Individuals with neglect frequently experience weakness in their arm/hand also. The purpose of this study is to test the effects of 3 different rehabilitation training sessions that combine non-invasive brain stimulation (transcranial direct current stimulation, tDCS) with arm/hand rehabilitation training (repetitive task-specific practice, RTP). This study is designed to determine the effects of tDCS + RTP on the excitability in the brain, attention to the affected side, and arm movement ability.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Emily Grattan
843-792-3435
grattan@musc.edu

The effects of impaired post-stroke coordination and motor pathway integrity on mobility performance Save

Date Added
November 6th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00048394
Researcher
Steven Kautz
Keywords
Healthy Volunteer Studies, Military, Muscle, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Walking is important to persons who have had a stroke and better rehabilitation methods are needed to restore or improve their walking. This project will investigate ways to improve upon and diagnose the specific underlying impairments. Future work will allow clinicians, such as physicians and physical therapists, to make measurements in their clinic to better diagnose a person?s specific walking deficit, design a specific treatment plan, and monitor its ability to restore or improve the person?s walking.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Landi Wilson
843-792-9013
Wilsolan@musc.edu

Operant down-conditioning of the soleus H-reflex in spastic hemiparesis after stroke Save

Date Added
October 6th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00048307
Researcher
Aiko Thompson
Keywords
Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

Reflexes are important parts of our movements. When reflexes are not working well, movements are clumsy or even impossible. After stroke, reflex responses may change. Researchers have found that people can learn to increase or decrease a reflex response with training. Recently, we have found that rats and people with partial spinal cord injuries can walk better after they are trained to change a spinal cord reflex. Thus, learning to change a reflex response may help people recover after a nervous system injury. In this study, we aim to examine whether learning to change a spinal reflex through operant conditioning training can improve movement function recovery in people after stroke or other damage to the nervous system.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Christina Thompson
843-792-6313
thompchr@musc.edu

Operant Conditioning of Spinal Reflexes in Youth Save

Date Added
August 4th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00046453
Researcher
Aiko Thompson
Keywords
Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

Reflexes are important parts of our movements. When reflexes are not working well, movements are clumsy or even impossible. Researchers have found that people can learn to increase or decrease a reflex response with training. Recently, we have found that rats with spinal cord injuries can walk better after they are trained to change a spinal cord reflex. Thus, learning to change a reflex response may help people recover after a nervous system injury. We are currently studying effects of spinal cord reflex training (e.g., a knee jerk reflex) in people in early adulthood. We hope that the results of this study will help us develop spinal reflex training as a new treatment to help people in early adulthood recover better after spinal cord injury or other damage to the nervous system.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Christina Thompson
843-792-6313
thompchr@musc.edu

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