Operant Conditioning of Spinal Reflexes to Enhance Motor Function Recovery after Spinal Cord injury Save

Date Added
April 7th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00095583
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies

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Keywords
Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

The purpose of the first portion of this study is to gather feedback from clinicians on the usability of the current system and procedure, so the researchers can make reflex training more useful and usable for improving recovery after spinal cord injury or other nervous system injuries and diseases. The researchers are recruiting 20 therapists who have been actively practicing physical medicine and 30 adults with no known neurological conditions to test system usability and the reflex operant conditioning protocol. For this portion of the study, there are 5 visits.

The purpose of the second part of the study is to validate the capacity of the system to change the size of the targeted reflex. For this the researchers are recruiting 25 individuals with chronic incomplete SCI who have spasticity in the leg to participate in the reflex training procedure. The study involves approximately 45 visits with a total study duration of about 6 months.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Neurophysiological characterization of dry needling in people with spasticity due to stroke Save

Date Added
March 3rd, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00095077
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies

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Keywords
Central Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The study team is recruiting 20 adults with spasticity due to chronic stroke and 20 adults with no neurological injuries for a 2 day study. In people with chronic stroke, one of the most common and disabling problems is spasticity (increased muscle tone or muscle stiffness). The purpose of this research study is to examine effects of dry needling on the nervous system (pathways between the muscle, spinal cord, and brain) in people with spasticity due to chronic stroke. Dry needling is a procedure in which a thin, stainless steel needle is inserted into your skin to produce a muscle twitch response. It is intended to release a knot in your muscle and relieve pain.

The total study duration is 2 days. The first visit will take about 3 hours, during which dry needling will take place, and the second visit will take about 1 hour. During both visits you will be asked to participate in examinations of reflexes (muscle responses to non-invasive nerve stimulation) and arm/leg function.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Characterization of physiological changes induced through motor-evoked potential conditioning in people with spinal cord injury Save

Date Added
December 3rd, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00091457
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies

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Keywords
Central Nervous System, Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

We are currently recruiting volunteers who are interested in participating in a brain-spinal cord-muscle response training study that aims to better understand the changes that take place in the nervous system as a result of this type of training. After spinal cord injury, brain-to-muscle connections are often interrupted. Because these connections are important in movement control, when they are not working well, movements may be disturbed. Researchers have found that people can learn to strengthen these connections through training. Strengthening these connections may be able to improve movement control and recovery after injuries.

Research participants will be asked to stand, sit, and walk during the study sessions. Electrodes are placed on the skin over leg muscles for monitoring muscle activity. For examining brain-to-muscle connections, we use transcranial magnetic stimulation. The stimulation is applied over the head and will indirectly stimulate brain cells with little or no discomfort.

Participation in this study requires approximately three sessions per week for four months, followed by two to three sessions over another three months. Each session lasts approximately 1 hour. Participants will receive a mileage reimbursement.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Spectral correlates of impulsivity in patients with traumatic brain injury: A study of the effect of transcranial electrical stimulation of the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex on response inhibition Save

Date Added
November 19th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00093356
Researcher
Nathan Rowland

List of Studies

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Keywords
Brain, Mental Health, Psychiatry, Rehabilitation Studies
Summary

Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) is a non-invasive form of brain stimulation that has previously been to shown to have therapeutic potential in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. In this study, we will use a brain activity monitor (electroencephalogram, EEG) and a computer-based task to observe the effects of different forms of tES, like transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial pulsed current stimulation (tPCS), on impulse control and sustained attention in people with TBI. Additionally, we will measure how much tDCS and tPCS affect the brain activity of a specific area of the brain associated with impulse control and attention. Problems with response inhibition have been shown to make rehabilitation more difficult for people with TBI. It also reduces social functioning and can also negatively affect job performance, which ultimately lead to a decreased quality of life. A better understanding of the effects of tES in TBI patients could be informative in finding out what its therapeutic potential is for this population.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Dominika Pullmann
843-329-9777
pullmann@musc.edu

Novel training environment to normalize altered finger force direction post stroke Save

Date Added
June 6th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00088988
Researcher
Na jin Seo

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Exercise, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine if 3-dimensional finger force training is an effective tool in restoring hand function post stroke. Persons who survived a stroke 3 to 9 months ago and have a hand impairment will be eligible to participate in this study. Participants will be asked to come to the laboratory to practice controlling the finger force generation 3 times a week for 6 weeks. Participants will see their performance on a computer screen. Participants will also come to the laboratory for additional 4-7 visits for assessments of their upper extremity function. The total duration of the study will be 2.5 months.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Na Jin Seo
8437920084
seon@musc.edu

Optimization of Closed-loop Transcutaneous Auricular Vagus Nerve Stimulation (taVNS) as a Neurorehabilitation Tool Save

Date Added
April 2nd, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00086291
Researcher
Bashar Badran

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

This study explores the use of a new form of neuromodulation known as transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (taVNS) which stimulates the ear. This stimulation will be delivered concurrently with upper limb motor rehabilitation training (3 days/week for 4 weeks) in chronic stroke patients. Patients will undergo a series of baseline assessments (including a brain scan), a 4-week course of motor rehabilitation, and post-assessments (including a second brain scan).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Morgan Dancy
843-876-5141
maddoxm@musc.edu

Neuroplasticity Associated with Extended Daily Use of a Sensorimotor Priming Vibration System to Improve Hand Function After Stroke Save

Date Added
March 5th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00086207
Researcher
Na jin Seo

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Aging, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The objective is to determine if continuous use of TheraBracelet in the home has a clinically meaningful effect in chronic stroke survivors. The study design is a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. We will enroll 40 chronic stroke survivors with moderate hand impairment. Subjects will be randomly assigned to the treatment or control group (n=20 per group). All subjects will wear the TheraBracelet device on the paretic wrist for 8 hours/day every day during their normal daily activity for 1 month. The device will deliver vibration (treatment) or no vibration (control). Double-blinding is possible because the treatment vibration is imperceptible (i.e., subthreshold). Measures of neural plasticity, the amount of the paretic arm use in daily living, clinical hand function, biomechanical grip control, and self-reported abilities for activities of daily living will be assessed at baseline, once a week during the month of wearing the device, and for 3-month follow-up, allowing determination of the efficacy and persistence.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Amanda Vatinno
843-792-8970
vatinno@musc.edu

TRANScranial direct current stimulation for POst-stroke motor Recovery - a phase II sTudy (TRANSPORT 2) Save

Date Added
February 25th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00083043
Researcher
Michelle Woodbury

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

This research is being done to find out if brain stimulation combined with a rehabilitation therapy improves arm weakness as a result of having a stroke. The stimulation technique is called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). The treatment uses direct electrical currents to stimulate specific parts of the brain. The rehabilitation therapy is called "modified Constraint Induced Movement Therapy" (mCIMT). During this rehabilitation therapy study participants will wear a mitt on the hand of the arm that was not affected by their stroke. It is designed to restrain the use of the unaffected arm, while performing therapy with impaired one.
It is not known if brain stimulation combined with rehabilitation therapy will improve arm weakness. Study participants will receive rehabilitation therapy while on this study. Study participants may or may not receive the brain stimulation therapy.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brenna Baker-Vogel
843-792-0651
bakebren@musc.edu

A novel therapy + e-learning self-management program for stroke survivors Save

Date Added
October 31st, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00081749
Researcher
Michelle Woodbury

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke survivors with arm paresis because of stroke use their "good" arm for daily activities, but in doing so may be self-limiting their own recovery of the "bad" arm. Traditional models of stroke rehabilitation fail to fully engage the survivor and care partner(s) in actively planning post-discharge habits that improve their capacity to live well over their entire lives. This study will test a cutting-edge in-person therapy + online training program designed to progressively transfer the responsibility of driving post-stroke recovery from the therapist to the survivor.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Scott Hutchison
843-792-2712
hutchis@musc.edu

Measurement of gait mechanics and movement in the lower extremity amputee Save

Date Added
October 30th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00082064
Researcher
Aaron Embry

List of Studies

Keywords
Exercise, Movement Disorders, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies
Summary

Walking after a lower extremity amputation is often difficult. It is important that researchers and clinicians understand the mechanisms that inhibit normal walking function. In this study, we are recruiting individuals with lower extremity limb loss for a walking and balance investigation. We will also be studying matched healthy controls to do similar study procedures. All study procedures will occur on the campus of MUSC by a licensed Physical Therapist and experienced researcher. Any questions should be directed to the coordinator listed.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aaron Embry
843-792-8198
embry@musc.edu

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