PROMISE-MG: Prospective Multicenter Observational Cohort Study of Comparative Effectiveness of Disease-Modifying Treatments for Myasthenia Gravis Save

Date Added
September 24th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00077927
Researcher
Katherine Ruzhansky
Keywords
Muscle, Nervous System
Summary

This is an observational study to develop a research registry to collect information from subjects with Myasthenia Gravis (MG) to evaluate the effects of the treatments they receive and to understand how their medical condition and treatment affects their daily life.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Katrina Madden
843-792-9186
maddenka@musc.edu

Direct measurement of motor cortical responses to transcranial direct current stimulation Save

Date Added
May 15th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00073545
Researcher
Nathan Rowland
Keywords
Brain, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Parkinsons, Surgery
Summary

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has shown the potential to improve symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease, however its effects have not been consistent in randomized studies to date, limiting widespread adoption of this technology. A critical gap in our knowledge is a detailed understanding of how tDCS affects motor areas in the brain. We propose using tDCS while recording directly from motor cortex using subdural electrocorticography (sECoG) in Parkinson's patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery. We expect this novel approach to broaden our understanding of tDCS application in Parkinson's disease and possibly lead to therapeutic advances in this population.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Sanicqua Robinson Smalls
843-792-8553
robinsst@musc.edu

Effect of Mexiletine on Cortical Hyperexcitability in Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (SALS) Save

Date Added
April 18th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00064552
Researcher
Amy Chen
Keywords
Muscle, Nervous System
Summary

The primary study objective is to determine whether treatment with mexiletine at doses of 300 mg/day or 600 mg/day suppresses cortical hyperexcitability in sporadic ALS patients relative to placebo, and, thus, may be able to slow progression in ALS. The change in resting motor threshold (RMT), estimated from single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) measurements made before treatment, after 4 weeks of treatment, and then again after a 4 week washout, will be used as the primary pharmacodynamic marker of cortical hyperexcitability.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Christine Hudson
843 792 3790
hudsoncm@musc.edu

Fluid Biomarkers with Deep Phenotyping in Patients with ALS Save

Date Added
June 21st, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00054504
Researcher
Amy Chen
Keywords
Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nervous System
Summary

You are invited to volunteer for a research study if you have been diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) within 2 years (24 Months) prior to screening.

This is a non interventional, longitudinal study in patients with ALS. There will be four (4) subject visits in this study: Baseline, month 6, month 12, and month 18. Subjects will have blood and cerebrospinal fluid (a clear fluid found in your brain and spine) collected, and be evaluated with assessment tools that focus on upper and lower motor skills and strength as well as cognitive function. Researchers will use these samples to study ALS, motor neuron disease and other medical conditions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Christine Hudson
843-792-3790
hudsoncm@musc.edu

The effects of impaired post-stroke coordination and motor pathway integrity on mobility performance Save

Date Added
November 6th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00048394
Researcher
Steven Kautz
Keywords
Healthy Volunteer Studies, Military, Muscle, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Walking is important to persons who have had a stroke and better rehabilitation methods are needed to restore or improve their walking. This project will investigate ways to improve upon and diagnose the specific underlying impairments. Future work will allow clinicians, such as physicians and physical therapists, to make measurements in their clinic to better diagnose a person's specific walking deficit, design a specific treatment plan, and monitor its ability to restore or improve the person's walking.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Landi Wilson
843-792-9013
Wilsolan@musc.edu

Assessment of Contributions to Impaired Walking after Neurologic Injury Save

Date Added
January 15th, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00028941
Researcher
Mark Bowden
Keywords
Brain, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Muscle, Nerve, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

Rehabilitation interventions including resistance training, functional and task-specific therapy, and gait or locomotor training have been shown to be successful in improving motor function in individuals with neurologic disease or injury. Recent investigations conducted in our laboratory indicate that intense resistance training coupled with task-specific functional training lead to significant gains in functional motor recovery. Similarly, gait rehabilitation involving intense treadmill training and/or task-specific locomotor training has been shown to be effective in improving locomotor ability. However, the underlying neural adaptations associated with these therapeutic approaches are not well understood. Our primary goal is to understand the motor control underpinnings of neurologic rehabilitation in order to apply this knowledge to future generations of therapeutic interventions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brian Cence
843-792-2668
cence@musc.edu

Skeletal Muscle Plasticity As An Indicator of Functional Performance Post Stroke Save

Date Added
August 12th, 2013
PRO Number
Pro00025988
Researcher
Chris Gregory
Keywords
Exercise, Muscle, Stroke
Summary

Weakness on one side of the body is seen in three-quarters of individuals following stroke. Weakness in this population results from both neural and muscular factors which include, respectively, the ability of the central nervous system to activate skeletal muscle as well as the force generating capacity of the muscle. Our overall goal is to improve walking in persons post-stroke by training subjects with an intervention that specifically targets these impairments, thereby facilitating locomotor recovery.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aaron Embry
843-792-8198
embry@musc.edu

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