Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Trial RandOmizing Heparin Save

Date Added
September 26th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00051279
Researcher
Alejandro Spiotta
Keywords
Adolescents, Brain, Drug Studies, Men's Health, Minorities, Obesity, Pain, Stroke, Women's Health
Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine if giving the medicine ?heparin? intravenously (through the veins) continuously for up to 14 days to subjects after a brain aneurysm has burst will help improve the chances of subjects having a good recovery after the bleed compared to subjects who get routine brain aneurysm care (standard of care). Patients who get routine care would also get heparin, but they would typically get an overall lower dose and the heparin would be injected under the skin (heparin shot) instead of in the veins.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Amora Mayo-Perez
843-792-1737
mayoaper@musc.edu

Validation of the Palliative Performance Scale to predict survival of older adults admitted to the hospital from the Emergency Department. Save

Date Added
August 4th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00063739
Researcher
Leigh Vaughan
Keywords
Cancer, Dementia, Heart, Kidney, Liver, Pulmonary, Stroke
Summary

The Palliative Performance Scale has been shown to predict survival among hospice and palliative medicine patients in the outpatient and inpatient clinical settings, where lower PPS scores are directly related to shorter survival. We seek to evaluate if this relationship persists among a racially diverse, older adult population when assessed at the time of admission from the emergency department.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jonas Te Paske
8432597649
tepaske@musc.edu

Functional Assistance provided by Myoelectric Elbow-wrist-hand orthoses (FAME) Save

Date Added
February 21st, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00061939
Researcher
Michelle Woodbury
Keywords
Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

This study, for stroke survivors with partial paralysis of one arm, will test whether or not an arm exoskeleton (the MyoPro Motion-G) immediately impacts arm movement more than a regular brace or more than wearing no brace. A stroke survivor who is 1 year or more post-stroke will qualify for this study if he/she has at least a little movement in the more affected arm. Subjects who qualify will come to MUSC 4 times over 3 weeks for about 2-3 hours per visit. During that time subjects will be fit for, and learn how to operate the exoskeleton and the comparison brace. Subjects' arm movement will be tested with a series of standard clinical measures of dexterity, functional task performance, range of motion, and strength.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Michelle Woodbury
843-792-1671
WoodbuML@musc.edu

An International, Multicentre, Prospective, Single-Arm Study to Assess the Effect on Voluntary Movements of AbobotulinumtoxinA 1500 U Administered in Both Upper and Lower Limbs in Conjunction with a Guided Self-Rehabilitation Contract in Adult Subjects with Spastic Hemiparesis Save

Date Added
January 24th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00062911
Researcher
Wuwei Feng
Keywords
Drug Studies, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The purpose of this clinical study is to see whether injections of AbobotulinumtoxinA in the upper limb (arm) and lower limb (leg) in combination with a personal exercise plan can improve voluntary movements in subjects with hemiparesis.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Fay Davis
843-792-0883
davisfa@musc.edu

TheraBracelet: The first and only wearable to instantly improve stroke hand function Save

Date Added
January 3rd, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00062471
Researcher
Na jin Seo
Keywords
Aging, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Post-stroke hand impairment is highly prevalent and severely restricts functional ability and independence. Yet, there is no assistive device to help hand function at home, every day, during activities of daily living. This study addresses this gap by providing an innovative technology. The ?TheraBracelet? is a wristband applying imperceptible white-noise vibration to skin. TheraBracelet is efficacious, as it has been shown to immediately improve chronic stroke survivors? touch sensation and hand dexterity in preliminary studies. TheraBracelet is affordable by using only a low-cost vibrator. TheraBracelet is also translational, because a vibrator strategically placed at the wrist does not interfere with dexterous finger motions, and it is low-risk by involving only imperceptible vibration on skin. These practicalities assure easy adoption in home environment for large impact on sensorimotor impairment. This study is to determine the feasibility and safety of using this assistive device all day every day for a month during daily activity, and to determine if TheraBracelet?s instant effects are sustained during prolonged use. This objective will be accomplished in a double-blinded, randomized, controlled, crossover design study. Feasibility (compliance of using the device everyday) and safety will be assessed for the treatment condition compared to the control condition (wearing the device without vibration) through weekly evaluations. In addition, TheraBracelet?s instant benefits in improving hand function will be assessed weekly. Persistence of TheraBracelet?s instant benefits across all weekly evaluations will support durability (i.e. desensitization to vibration does not occur during extended daily use over a one-month period). This project is expected to lead to an assistive wristband that increases hand function during activities of daily living, thus increasing independence and quality of life and reducing caregiver burden for a large number of stroke survivors with hand impairment.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Andrew Fortune
843-792-8970
fortunea@musc.edu

Acute Effects of Continuous and Interval Exercise Training on Locomotor Function Post-stroke. Save

Date Added
December 28th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00059711
Researcher
Stacey Aaron
Keywords
Exercise, Stroke
Summary

Many individuals post-stroke have a hard time walking independently and freely in their homes and communities. Therefore, it is not surprising that the number one goal stated post-stroke is to regain walking function and is a central focus in rehabilitation. Current recommendations for improving post-stroke walking speed involves walking at a constant or continuous speed, however an new approach is the use of interval training that includes alternating between higher intensity and low intensity periods. Interval training is shown to result in larger gains in speed in neurologically healthy subjects. Preliminary data show higher intensity interval training to be possible in individuals following stroke, however direct comparisons of interval training to continuous training on walking function are not known. For this study there are two required sessions with the possibility of being asked to participate in additional sessions. A minimum of 48 hours in required between sessions. Each session lasts approximately two and half hours.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brian Cence
843-792-2668
cence@musc.edu

Operant conditioning of spinal reflexes in healthy people and people with neurological disorders. Save

Date Added
November 23rd, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00060769
Researcher
Richard Segal
Keywords
Body Composition, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Our long term goal is to enhance the locomotion of impaired individuals after a neurological injury.
We are trying to recruit as healthy control participants, and neurologically impaired individuals (incomplete SCI and after-stroke patients) to participate in this study.
For neurologically impaired individuals a physical therapist will complete IRB approved questionnaires to measure your mobility, muscle strength, balance, walking speed, and distance.
All participants will meet with study staff who would then test your reflexes by placing some superficial skin based electrodes behind the knee and apply mild stimulation while standing/sitting.
If enrolled, you may be required to participate for 30 sessions (3 sessions/week), each lasting about one hour over a period of 3 months. Compensation is available for your participation.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aviroop Dutt-Mazumder
843-792-0275
duttamaz@musc.edu

S.C.O.P.E. Systematic Collection and Objective Progressive Exercise Save

Date Added
November 16th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00057398
Researcher
Mark Bowden
Keywords
Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

We have designed a comprehensive, evidence-based approach to physical therapy rehabilitation after stroke that focuses on the intensity of cardiovascular, strength, and gait training, standardizing the dosage and progression of each type of training. Implementation of this standardization of intensity protocol will be guided via an internet-based (REDCap) interactive program available to each treating therapist. This program will cue the therapist to complete two sessions of cardiovascular, strength, and gait training each week at the appropriate intensity while not being prescriptive about specific activities to meet the stated goals. Eighty individuals with stroke (20 each from Charleston, SC; Anderson, SC; Rock Hill, SC; and York, PA ) who meet inclusion and exclusion criteria and will undergo a standardized evaluation at admission and discharge assessing gait speed, endurance, strength, balance, and overall functional independence and will be compared to 80 individuals with stroke receiving usual care. In addition, each enrollee will participate in a telephone screen at 90 days post-stroke to assess participation, quality of life, falls efficacy, falls history, and stroke-related secondary health conditions/readmissions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Eric Monsch
(843) 792-0275
monsch@musc.edu

Center for the Study of Aphasia Recovery (C-STAR) - Project 1 (POLAR) Project 001: Modeling Treated Recovery from Aphasia Save

Date Added
November 9th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00058579
Researcher
Leonardo Bonilha
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Speech and language therapy for the management of aphasia (a language impairment that often occurs as a result of a stroke) is generally shown to be effective. However, the reasons that certain treatments may work for some individuals, and not others, and why some individuals do not respond to treatment is largely unknown. In this study, we plan to identify and model the relationship between many different factors (such as personal/biographical factors and an individual's baseline cognitive and language abilities) to help predict aphasia treatment outcome. Participants will be recruited for speech and language testing, brain imaging (MRI), and aphasia treatment (as warranted).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Katie Murphy
843-792-3678
murka@musc.edu

Establishing the functional viability and dose-response of Duck, Duck Punch: A Stroke Rehabilitation Computer Game Save

Date Added
October 25th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00059924
Researcher
Michelle Woodbury
Keywords
Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

This study has 2 parts: In one part of this study, people with stroke will either play a custom designed computer game for stroke rehabilitation called Duck Duck Punch or an off the shelf computer game with their weaker arm 3 times per week for 6 weeks. Evaluations will determine whether or not one computer game improved arm movement more than the other. In the second part of the study, people with stroke, caregivers of people with stroke and stroke rehabilitation therapists will meet in several focus groups to design a useful and informative Duck Duck Punch performance report.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Michelle Woodbury
843-792-1671
WoodbuML@musc.edu

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