Neurophysiological characterization of dry needling in people with spasticity due to stroke Save

Date Added
March 3rd, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00095077
Researcher
Aiko Thompson

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Central Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The study team is recruiting 20 adults with spasticity due to chronic stroke and 20 adults with no neurological injuries for a 2 day study. In people with chronic stroke, one of the most common and disabling problems is spasticity (increased muscle tone or muscle stiffness). The purpose of this research study is to examine effects of dry needling on the nervous system (pathways between the muscle, spinal cord, and brain) in people with spasticity due to chronic stroke. Dry needling is a procedure in which a thin, stainless steel needle is inserted into your skin to produce a muscle twitch response. It is intended to release a knot in your muscle and relieve pain.

The total study duration is 2 days. The first visit will take about 3 hours, during which dry needling will take place, and the second visit will take about 1 hour. During both visits you will be asked to participate in examinations of reflexes (muscle responses to non-invasive nerve stimulation) and arm/leg function.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Blair Dellenbach
843-792-6313
stecb@musc.edu

Speech entrainment for Aphasia Recovery Save

Date Added
January 6th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00091924
Researcher
Leonardo Bonilha

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Language, Speech Disorders, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

After a stroke, many people experience a language impairment called aphasia. One of the most debilitating types of aphasia is non-fluent aphasia. Non-fluent aphasia is defined by significantly reduced speech production, with the speaker producing only a few words or even less. Speech entrainment therapy (SET) is a treatment that has been shown to increase fluency in people with non-fluent aphasia. Our study looks to define the best dose of SET that leads to sustained improvements in spontaneous speech production.
Participants who are eligible will undergo baseline language testing, an MRI, and will be randomized into one of 4 treatment groups: SET for 3 weeks, SET for 4.5 weeks, SET for 6 weeks, and no treatment (control group).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Anna Doyle
843-792-3678
doylean@musc.edu

Angiogenic Factors in Intracranial Arterial Stenosis Save

Date Added
December 27th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00093708
Researcher
Tanya Turan

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Stroke
Summary

Protocol Title: Angiogenic Factors in Intracranial Arterial Stenosis

The purpose of this study is to look at factors in the blood that effect the process of new blood vessel formation (those that help or "pro-angiogenic" and those that inhibit "anti-angiogenic") in patients with Intracranial Arterial Stenosis (ICAS) or narrowing of the brain arteries. Male and female adult subjects between 30-80 years will participate. Approximately 273 eligible subjects will be enrolled study wide at multiple sites. Subjects will participate in the study for 12 months including 3 visits with collection of medical information and blood draws. De-identified blood samples will be stored and although direct participation is completed after 12 months, a patient's blood may be studied years later.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Ariana Tinker
843-792-6881
tinkera@musc.edu

Anticoagulation in Intracerebral Hemorrhage (ICH) Survivors for Stroke Prevention and Recovery (ASPIRE) Save

Date Added
October 7th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00092649
Researcher
Christine Holmstedt

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Stroke
Summary

The purpose of the study is to compare the effects of apixaban (also known as Eliquis®) with aspirin in patients with atrial fibrillation and a recent brain hemorrhage to see which is better in preventing strokes and death.

Subjects will be in the research study for up to 3 years (minimum of 1 year). About 700 people will take part in this study at approximately 125 sites throughout the United States.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Vicki Streets
843-792-7118
streetsv@musc.edu

Effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on cortical oscillations during a virtual reality task Save

Date Added
August 20th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00087153
Researcher
Nathan Rowland

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Brain, Parkinsons, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has shown the potential to improve symptoms in patients with movement deficits, such as Parkinson's disease and chronic stroke. However, the effects of tDCS have so far not been proven on a wider scale due to lack of knowledge regarding exactly how tDCS works. This has limited the adoption of this potentially useful therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease, chronic stroke and other conditions affecting movement. We think that by studying the effect of tDCS on brain signals while subjects perform a virtual reality task that requires integration of visual and motor information we can separate out exactly what occurs in the brain when tDCS is turned on. We expect this approach to broaden our understanding of tDCS application in conditions affecting movement and possibly lead to therapeutic advances in this population.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brenna Baker-Vogel
(843)792-0651
bakebren@musc.edu

Concomitant sensory stimulation during therapy to enhance hand functional recovery post stroke Save

Date Added
August 6th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00090790
Researcher
Na jin Seo

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Aging, Exercise, Movement Disorders, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Hand disability after stroke has a profound negative impact on functional ability and independence. Hand therapy may be augmented with sensory stimulation for better outcomes. We have developed a novel sensory stimulation - unfelt vibration applied via a wristwatch. In this study, we will determine if combining this stimulation with hand task practice is superior to hand task practice alone.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Na Jin Seo
8437920084
seon@musc.edu

ARCADIA-CSI (Cognition and Silent Infarcts) Save

Date Added
July 31st, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00091520
Researcher
Christine Holmstedt

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Stroke
Summary

This is a research study looking to compare the effects (good and bad) of the ARCADIA study drugs (apixaban and aspirin) on the occurrence of silent strokes and memory loss after stroke.

This add-on study to the ARCADIA trial involves cognitive testing (tests designed to measure subjects memory, thinking, reasoning and understanding) and an MRI scan of their brain.

There will be about 5 study visits over the length of the study (approximately 3 years), or for a long as subjects are in the parent ARCADIA study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Vicki Streets
843-792-8606
streetsv@musc.edu

Fatigue and mobility in stroke: a biomechanical and neurophysiological investigation Save

Date Added
June 6th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00088728
Researcher
John Kindred

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Fatigue is a common and disabling symptom post-stroke.

Causes of post-stroke fatigue are not well known.

This study will investigate how changes in the way the brain communicates may be associated with post-stroke fatigue.

To do this the investigators will use transcranial magnetic stimulation, TMS, to measure how the brain communicates.

TMS uses a magnet that turns on parts of the brain, and researchers can measure the response by placing sensors on specific muscles in the legs.

The researchers will also measure how you walk by placing sensors on your body and having you walk on a treadmill.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Alyssa Hydar
8437928171
hydar@musc.edu

Sleep for Stroke Management And Recovery Trial Save

Date Added
May 22nd, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00084906
Researcher
Souvik Sen

List of Studies

Keywords
Sleep Disorders, Stroke
Summary

Investigator-initiated, phase 3 multicenter, prospective randomized open-, blinded-endpoint (PROBE) controlled trial to test whether treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with continuous positive airway pressure is effective for secondary prevention and recovery after stroke.

Patients with recent (?14 days) acute ischemic stroke or high-risk TIA (ABCD2 ?4) are enrolled during their acute or rehabilitation hospitalization and treated for 6 months. After consent, a portable cardiopulmonary sleep apnea test (the Nox T3) is used to screen for OSA (AHIT3?10) and to exclude central sleep apnea (where CAI ?50% of the total AHIT3). aCPAP is then used on one night to determine tolerability (the "run-in" night). Subjects who use the device for ?4 hours on that night, and do not have excessive treatment-emergent central sleep apnea (CAI remains <10 on aCPAP machine-generated data), are randomized to receive either 6 months of aCPAP plus usual medical therapy, or usual medical therapy alone. Adherence information is provided to subjects in the intervention group, to offer education about treatment and to increase treatment adherence. Subjects and their caregivers also are taught about aCPAP use. Through a centralized service, managed by FusionHealth, adherence to aCPAP is monitored in nearly real time in most cases by wireless means, and supported remotely throughout the treatment period.

Institution
Palmetto
Recruitment Contact
Mihyun Lim
803-545-6078
mihyun.lim@uscmed.sc.edu

Neuromodulation of Cognitive Control Neurocircuits for Stroke Rehabilitation Save

Date Added
May 7th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00086015
Researcher
Lisa Mcteague

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Memory Loss, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The goal of this study is to determine the pattern of cognitive impairment in chronic stroke, both in terms of performance during cognitive testing as well as brain neurocircuit activation.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lisa McTeague
843-792-8274
mcteague@musc.edu

Change_preferences

-- OR --

Create_login