Neuromodulation of Cognitive Control Neurocircuits for Stroke Rehabilitation Save

Date Added
May 7th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00086015
Researcher
Lisa Mcteague

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Memory Loss, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The goal of this study is to determine the pattern of cognitive impairment in chronic stroke, both in terms of performance during cognitive testing as well as brain neurocircuit activation.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lisa McTeague
843-792-8274
mcteague@musc.edu

Optimization of TMS Assessment after Stroke Save

Date Added
May 4th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00087761
Researcher
Mark Bowden

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The purpose of this research study is to understand how the brain communicates with the muscles in the leg in people who have sustained a stroke by using a type of brain stimulation called transcranial magnetic stimulation, or TMS. TMS has been used successfully in numerous investigations but we are not confident of which measures are best to use in those with stroke. The purpose of this study is to establish how best to collect these measures when walking ability is of primary concern. In this study participants will undergo testing while sitting comfortably, which is standard practice, and then again while standing, our experimental condition.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Alyssa Hydar
843-792-8171
hydar@musc.edu

Optimization of Closed-loop Transcutaneous Auricular Vagus Nerve Stimulation (taVNS) as a Neurorehabilitation Tool Save

Date Added
April 2nd, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00086291
Researcher
Bashar Badran

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

This study explores the use of a new form of neuromodulation known as transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (taVNS) which stimulates the ear. This stimulation will be delivered concurrently with upper limb motor rehabilitation training (3 days/week for 4 weeks) in chronic stroke patients. Patients will undergo a series of baseline assessments (including a brain scan), a 4-week course of motor rehabilitation, and post-assessments (including a second brain scan).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Morgan Dancy
843-792-6076
maddoxm@musc.edu

A Phase III, Prospective, Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Thrombolysis in Imaging-Eligible, Late-Window Patients To Assess the Efficacy and Safety of Tenecteplase Save

Date Added
March 26th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00086659
Researcher
Christine Holmstedt

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Stroke
Summary

The purpose of this research study is to evaluate the desired outcome and safety of the study drug, tenecteplase, compared to a placebo in patients with an acute ischemic stroke. Tenecteplase is approved by the health authorities for the treatment of heart attack, but it is not approved for stroke.

Participants will be screened within 4.5 to 24 hours after the onset of the stroke and will undergo 2 followup MRIs within 96 hours.

Follow-up clinic visits will occur at 30 and 90 days after study treatment. Total study duration is about 3 months.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Vicki Streets
(843)-792-8606
streetsv@musc.edu

Neuroplasticity Associated with Extended Daily Use of a Sensorimotor Priming Vibration System to Improve Hand Function After Stroke Save

Date Added
March 5th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00086207
Researcher
Na jin Seo

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Aging, Central Nervous System, Movement Disorders, Muscle, Nerve, Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The objective is to determine if continuous use of TheraBracelet in the home has a clinically meaningful effect in chronic stroke survivors. The study design is a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. We will enroll 40 chronic stroke survivors with moderate hand impairment. Subjects will be randomly assigned to the treatment or control group (n=20 per group). All subjects will wear the TheraBracelet device on the paretic wrist for 8 hours/day every day during their normal daily activity for 1 month. The device will deliver vibration (treatment) or no vibration (control). Double-blinding is possible because the treatment vibration is imperceptible (i.e., subthreshold). Measures of neural plasticity, the amount of the paretic arm use in daily living, clinical hand function, biomechanical grip control, and self-reported abilities for activities of daily living will be assessed at baseline, once a week during the month of wearing the device, and for 3-month follow-up, allowing determination of the efficacy and persistence.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Amanda Vatinno
843-792-8970
vatinno@musc.edu

TRANScranial direct current stimulation for POst-stroke motor Recovery - a phase II sTudy (TRANSPORT 2) Save

Date Added
February 25th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00083043
Researcher
Michelle Woodbury

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

This research is being done to find out if brain stimulation combined with a rehabilitation therapy improves arm weakness as a result of having a stroke. The stimulation technique is called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). The treatment uses direct electrical currents to stimulate specific parts of the brain. The rehabilitation therapy is called "modified Constraint Induced Movement Therapy" (mCIMT). During this rehabilitation therapy study participants will wear a mitt on the hand of the arm that was not affected by their stroke. It is designed to restrain the use of the unaffected arm, while performing therapy with impaired one.
It is not known if brain stimulation combined with rehabilitation therapy will improve arm weakness. Study participants will receive rehabilitation therapy while on this study. Study participants may or may not receive the brain stimulation therapy.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Kelly Krajeck
843-792-0189
krajeck@musc.edu

Multi-arm Optimization of Stroke Thrombolysis (MOST): a blinded, randomized controlled adaptive, multi-arm, adjunctive-thrombolysis efficacy trial in ischemic stroke. Save

Date Added
February 19th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00085585
Researcher
Chirantan Banerjee

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Stroke
Summary

Multi-arm Optimization of Stroke Thrombolysis (MOST): The goal of this study is to determine the effectiveness of combining a drug known as tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, with blood thinners argatroban or eptifibatide. The research will look at whether combining tPA with either argatroban or eptifibatide will produce better results in stroke patients in the first 90 days after suffering a stroke versus tPA with a placebo. The safety of argatroban and eptifibatide in combination with IV rt-PA and endovascular thrombectomy will also be assessed.

The plan is for 110 hospitals to take part in the study through NIH StrokeNet, the University of Cincinnati based National Coordinating Center for all stroke trials funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. A maximum of 1200 subjects will be enrolled.

The first 150 subjects will be randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to either argatroban, eptifibatide, or placebo. From the 150th to the 500th subject enrollment, response adaptive randomization (RAR) will favor the active arm showing the greatest benefit based on accrued data. After 500 subjects, one or both intervention arms may be carried forward for fixed randomization versus placebo.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Vicki Streets
843-792-8606
streetsv@musc.edu

Age-related changes in neuroplasticity impede recovery in post-stroke depression: a novel exercise and brain stimulation paradigm to prime neuroplastic potential Save

Date Added
December 4th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00083079
Researcher
Ryan Ross

List of Studies

Keywords
Brain, Depression, Exercise, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke affects millions of Americans and is a leading cause of disability. In addition to chronic disability, many survivors experience depressive symptoms such as reductions in mood and motivation. Post-stroke depression (PSD) is associated with poorer recovery from stroke, increased health care costs and higher mortality. Additionally, PSD may interfere with the recovery of the nervous system after stroke. Effective treatment options for PSD are limited and often come with side effects, highlighting the need for alternative treatment approaches. Aerobic exercise (AEx) has positive effects on the nervous system, is a powerful anti-depressant, and has limited side effects, yet remains underutilized in stroke survivors with PSD. This study will examine the short-term effects of AEx on the nervous system in stroke survivors with and without PSD. The results will serve as a foundation for the study of AEx as a treatment for PSD.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Ryan Ross
843-792-3477
rossre@musc.edu

Predicting Post Stroke Limb Spasticity Save

Date Added
November 13th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00083119
Researcher
Wuwei Feng

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Stroke
Summary

This study is to determine which stroke patients will develop moderate-to-severe limb tightness (spasticity) or limb weakness 90 days after a stroke.
Inpatients at Medical University of South Carolina, 21 years old or older, with first-ever stroke with limb tightness or weakness on one side can participate.
This study has 3 visits in 90 days.
The data from this study will then be combined with existing data to develop a simple bedside assessment for post-stroke limb spasticity 90 days post-stroke.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Fay Davis
843-792-0883
davisfa@musc.edu

Neuromodulation and Plasticity in Cognitive Control Neurocircuitry in Chronic Stroke Save

Date Added
November 6th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00083136
Researcher
Lisa Mcteague

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

The goal of this pilot study is to determine whether a repetitive high-dose form of non-invasive brain stimulation is a promising and safe treatment for stroke-related cognitive difficulties. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an FDA approved treatment for depression, and is used commonly to treat people for their depression. In studies of rTMS for depression and other disorders, individuals have experienced improved cognitive function. Thus, we are testing here whether cognitive function in individuals with chronic stroke could be improved by rTMS.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lisa McTeague
843-792-8274
mcteague@musc.edu

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