Aging and Spinal Cord Injury: A 45-year Longitudinal Study Save

Date Added
February 24th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00060766
Researcher
James Krause
Keywords
Spinal Cord
Summary

Our purpose is to conduct a 45-year follow-up, the ninth data collection in the SCI Longitudinal Aging Study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Richard Aust
843-792-2605
aust@musc.edu

The effect of early versus late urinary catheter removal on post-operative urinary retention (POUR) and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) rates in patients with POUR risk factors receiving thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) for post-operative thoracic surgery pain control Save

Date Added
November 15th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00058458
Researcher
Michaella Prasad
Keywords
Bladder, Infectious Diseases, Pain, Spinal Cord, Surgery, Urinary
Summary

Patients scheduled for thoracic surgery will be identified as potential candidates and recruited by a research coordinator before surgery. Research subjects will be randomized to either early or late post-operative urinary catheter (a thin flexible tube placed into the bladder to drain urine) removal. Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA), a thin tube placed near the spinal cord, will remain functioning after urinary catheter removal for the early group. The study group randomized to early catheter removal will have urinary catheters removed 24 hours after surgery is completed. Study subjects that are randomized to late removal of urinary catheter will have urinary catheters removed after TEA is discontinued as routine clinical care (usually 4-5 days). Determination of bladder urine volume will be made by sound wave examination (ultrasound) by appropriately-trained staff. Following indwelling urinary catheter removal, research subjects may receive a brief urine drain tube as standard clinical care. Laboratory urine analysis will be obtained from urine following removal of urinary catheter and assessed for urinary tract infection (UTI).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Bill Rawls
9196360725
rawlsw@musc.edu

A PHASE III, MULTICENTRE, RANDOMISED, DOUBLE BLIND, PARALLEL GROUP, PLACEBO CONTROLLED STUDY TO ASSESS THE EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF ONE OR MORE INTRADETRUSOR TREATMENTS OF 600 OR 800 UNITS OF DYSPORT® FOR THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE IN SUBJECTS WITH NEUROGENIC DETRUSOR OVERACTIVITY DUE TO SPINAL CORD INJURY OR MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS Save

Date Added
August 9th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00058027
Researcher
Lindsey Cox
Keywords
Bladder, Multiple Sclerosis, Spinal Cord
Summary

The main objective of this study is to evaluate if Dysport® is effective and safe for the treatment of urinary incontinence due to NDO.

Dysport® contains a toxin that is produced from bacteria. The toxin is called Botulinum toxin A and it is known that this toxin causes muscles that are contracting too much to relax once the muscles are injected with the toxin. This relaxation usually lasts for several months before treatment needs to be given again.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jessica Jenkins
843-876-0630
843792-2325

Operant Conditioning of Spinal Reflexes in Youth Save

Date Added
August 4th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00046453
Researcher
Aiko Thompson
Keywords
Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

Reflexes are important parts of our movements. When reflexes are not working well, movements are clumsy or even impossible. Researchers have found that people can learn to increase or decrease a reflex response with training. Recently, we have found that rats with spinal cord injuries can walk better after they are trained to change a spinal cord reflex. Thus, learning to change a reflex response may help people recover after a nervous system injury. We are currently studying effects of spinal cord reflex training (e.g., a knee jerk reflex) in people in early adulthood. We hope that the results of this study will help us develop spinal reflex training as a new treatment to help people in early adulthood recover better after spinal cord injury or other damage to the nervous system.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Christina Thompson
843-792-6313
thompchr@musc.edu

Operant Conditioning of Spinal Reflexes to Improve Motor Function Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury Save

Date Added
April 7th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00042082
Researcher
Aiko Thompson
Keywords
Nervous System, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

Reflexes are important parts of our movements. When reflexes are not working well, movements are clumsy or even impossible. After spinal cord injury, reflex responses may change. Researchers have found that people can learn to increase or decrease a reflex response with training. Recently, we have found that rats with spinal cord injuries can walk better after they are trained to change a spinal reflex. Thus, learning to change a reflex response may help people recover after a nervous system injury. In this study, we aim to examine whether learning to change a spinal reflex through operant conditioning training can improve movement function recovery after spinal cord injury.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Christina Thompson
843-792-6313
thompchr@musc.edu

Modulation of Spinal Reflexes during Walking in People after Spinal Cord Injury Save

Date Added
April 7th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00042824
Researcher
Aiko Thompson
Keywords
Movement Disorders, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

Spinal reflexes take important part in our movement. After spinal cord injury (SCI), reflexes often change. For many years, researchers and doctors have assumed that abnormally acting spinal reflexes lead to movement problems, without clear scientific evidence. For example, in people who suffer spasticity, a common problem after SCI, walking is disturbed, presumably because stretch reflexes (e.g., knee jerk reflex) and some other reflexes are not working well. Yet, which reflex is causing a problem in what way has not been well understood. Such understanding is very important in developing and applying effective therapies for improving gait recovery after SCI. Therefore, in this project, we are studying spinal stretch reflexes and other reflexes during walking, to understand how these reflexes contribute to spastic gait problems in people with chronic incomplete SCI. Successful completion of this project will result in better understanding of spastic gait problems, which in turn, will help us develop more effective therapy application and improve the quality of life in people after SCI.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Christina Thompson
843-792-6313
thompchr@musc.edu

Operant Conditioning of Motor Evoked Potential to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to Improve Motor Function Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury Save

Date Added
April 7th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00042109
Researcher
Aiko Thompson
Keywords
Movement Disorders, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord
Summary

Over many years, we have learnt that the brain?s connections with the spinal cord change in response to injury or training. Because brain-spinal cord (i.e., corticospinal) pathways are very important in movement control, restoring function of these pathways could help to restore useful movement after spinal cord injury (SCI). In this project, we hypothesize that operant conditioning training of the muscle response to non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation can strengthen the functional connectivity of corticospinal pathways and thereby alleviate movement problems in people with chronic incomplete SCI. Specifically, through this project, we will investigate the effects of strengthening the corticospinal connection to the ankle dorsiflexor muscles through operant up-conditioning of the muscle evoked response, in hope to enhance the function of corticospinal pathways and alleviate foot drop (i.e., weak ankle dorsiflexion resulting in toe drop and drag) during walking in people with chronic incomplete SCI.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Thompson, Christina R.
843-792-6313
thompchr@musc.edu

A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF THE VTI INTERFUSE T™ Save

Date Added
January 13th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00038646
Researcher
Stephen Kalhorn
Keywords
Spinal Cord
Summary

The primary endpoints of the investigation will include assessment of the maintenance of disc height and fusion rates demonstrated by radiographic evidence based on plain radiographs and CT. Fusion is defined as a bone bridging across the disc space at the level of the InterFuse T™ implant. Length of stay, implant migration, implant subsidence, reoperation rate, and Opiod use will be recorded. It is anticipated that outcomes with the InterFuse T™ Interbody Fusion Device will be comparable to or better than the historical published results for other non-modular TLIF devices, and to the control device used concurrently in this study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Michele DeCandio
(843) 792-9016
decandio@musc.edu

RRTC on Secondary Conditions after SCI: Study 1 - Risk and protective factors for secondary conditions: A 15-year longitudinal study. Save

Date Added
May 16th, 2013
IRB Number
19671
Researcher
James Krause
Keywords
Spinal Cord
Summary

The purpose of this study is to identify risk and protective factors for future secondary conditions after spinal cord injury. Our goal is to increase knowledge that can be used to develop prevention strategies targeting factors most predictive of the greatest number of secondary conditions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Richard Aust
843-792-2605
aust@musc.edu

Clinical Database for Rehabilitation Research after Neurological Injury Save

Date Added
May 7th, 2012
PRO Number
Pro00015991
Researcher
Steven Kautz
Keywords
Healthy Volunteer Studies, Rehabilitation Studies, Spinal Cord, Stroke
Summary

In this study researchers aim to improve the collaborative research efforts of the Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions at the Medical University of South Carolina. The Center is comprised of several laboratories, including: the Communication and Swallowing Laboratory; the Locomotor Energetics and Assessment Laboratory; the Locomotor Rehabilitation Laboratory; the Neuromuscular Assessment Laboratory; and the Upper Extremity Motor Function Laboratory. The PI and investigators will recruit for their current and future studies in the above laboratories from the Clinical Database established here. Studies utilizing the Clinical Database will not include PHI but will only link to the Clinical Database individual patient code. This study is completed by completing a simple screening form with study personnel. Medical care/treatment future participation in studies is not influenced by inclusion in this study. We are also recruiting Healthy Controls for this study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aaron Embry
843-792-8198
embry@musc.edu

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