Neural Determinants of Age-Related Change in Auditory-Visual Speech Processing Save

Date Added
September 24th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00070971
Researcher
James Dias
Keywords
Aging, Brain, Central Nervous System, Ears, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Hearing, Language, Minorities, Vision/ Eye
Summary

Older adults typically have trouble identifying the speech they hear, especially in noisy environments. Fortunately, compared to younger adults, older adults are better able to compensate for difficulties identifying the speech they hear by recruiting the visual system. However, the extent to which older adults can benefit from visual input, and how this influence relates to age-related changes in brain structure and function, have not been thoroughly investigated. The general purpose of this study is to determine how age-related changes in brain structure and function affect how well people hear and see. This study seeks participants with normal hearing to mild hearing loss, who also have normal or corrected-to-normal vision.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
James Dias
(843) 792-3921
diasj@musc.edu

Scalp EEG correlates of cognitive function. Save

Date Added
February 26th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00039433
Researcher
Leonardo Bonilha
Keywords
Language
Summary

This research study will evaluate how the brain processes language and speech. It will use EEG to determine how brain waves are associated with speech and language. The researchers will combine the information from EEG with MRI images to better understand where in the brain the waves related to speech and language come from.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Sheri Davis
843 792 2845
davshe@musc.edu

Language Development in Teens and Young Adults with Fragile X Syndrome or Autism Save

Date Added
January 25th, 2012
PRO Number
Pro00014212
Researcher
Jane Roberts
Keywords
Adolescents, Autism, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Language
Summary

We are recruiting mothers of children with typical development, autism, or fragile X syndrome.

This study focuses on parental experiences and normal individual differences that may influence child language development. The broader goal of the study is to understand which family experiences support language development in children who have neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as autism. We are recruiting families who have children who are typically developing, have autism, or have fragile X syndrome.

Institution
USC
Recruitment Contact
Jessica Klusek
803 777 5676
klusek@mailbox.sc.edu

Change_preferences

-- OR --

Create_login