A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Study to Evaluate the Efficacy of Ketamine for the Treatment of Concurrent Opioid Use Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder Save

Date Added
November 5th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00091292
Researcher
Jennifer Jones

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Keywords
Depression, Mental Health, Psychiatry, Substance Use
Summary

The purpose of the study is to examine whether an investigational medication called ketamine, which comes in the form of a nasal spray, is able to improve treatment outcomes for concurrent opioid addiction and depression when used in conjunction with buprenorphine treatment. Study medications will be delivered twice per week for four weeks. If you are eligible and you decide to enroll in the study, your participation will last approximately 8 weeks, or 2 months.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jennifer Jones
(843) 792-5594
jonjen@musc.edu

Assessing the Efficacy of a Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor for Improving Meniere's Disease Outcomes Save

Date Added
October 1st, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00091200
Researcher
Habib Rizk

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Depression, Drug Studies, Ears
Summary

As of yet, the cause of Meniere's disease is uncertain and there is no cure. Given the lack of high level evidence for treatments, we seek to perform a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover, pilot trial of venlafaxine for treating Meniere's disease. Venlafaxine is a safe and well-tolerated medication. It has never been trialed in Meniere's disease, but there is evidence that it could be effective in helping with vertigo attacks and other aspects of the disorder.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Habib Rizk
843 876-0112
rizkh@musc.edu

Assessing Mental Health Resources in U.S. Trauma Centers for Families Affected by Pediatric Traumatic Injury Save

Date Added
September 27th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00091869
Researcher
Leigh Ridings

List of Studies

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Keywords
Children's Health, Depression, Mental Health, Pediatrics, Surgery
Summary

Pediatric traumatic injury (PTI) ? defined as unintentional injury requiring hospitalization and, often, extended periods of physical and emotional recovery ? is experienced by 300,000 children in the U.S. annually. Roughly 20-40% of children and caregivers develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or depression following PTI, yet most U.S. trauma centers fail to provide even basic mental health screening post-injury. It is critical to advance our knowledge of available mental health services in trauma centers for this frequently overlooked population to accelerate their physical and emotional recovery. In this project, trauma center providers across the U.S. will complete a survey and a qualitative interview to assess their current protocols and resources available to screen and treat children and families' mental health in the aftermath of PTI, as well as their opinions regarding feasibility of implementing protocols to better address the emotional health recovery within this population.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Leigh Ridings
843-792-5146
ridingle@musc.edu

Managing AsThma AnD Obesity Related Symptoms (MATADORS) study: An mHealth intervention to facilitate symptom self-management among youth Save

Date Added
August 8th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00090560
Researcher
Michelle Nichols

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Adolescents, Asthma, Children's Health, Depression, Obesity, Pain
Summary

Youth with one or more chronic diseases are at increased risk of further complications, disease, or even early death as they enter their adult years. Recent increases in both asthma and obesity among youth have led to high health care utilization, increased health-related complications, and expanded risks of subsequent cardiovascular disease burden. The research team will develop educational content in core areas (e.g., fatigue, physical activity) for Managing AsThma AnD Obesity Related Symptoms (MATADORS), an mHealth technology-enhanced nurse-guided intervention. Youth with asthma and obesity and their primary caregivers will participate in interviews to explore their perspectives on barriers, facilitators, needs, and preferences toward adopting health behaviors, medication adherence, disease awareness, symptom self-management behaviors, and utilization of a mobile smartphone platform. Additional details on content availability, delivery approaches, system needs, and functionality will be explored through semi-structured interview questions. Health care providers (physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, dietitians, and respiratory and exercise therapists) will be invited to participate in interviews to seek their input on patient-caregiver needs, priority clinical focal areas, recommendations for symptom self-management, and preferences for intervention delivery. Interview findings will be used to inform intervention and app design. Providing youth with strategies to enhance symptom self-management may result in decreased symptom prevalence, improved quality of life, and long-term reduction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as they move into adulthood.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Margaret Prentice
843-792-4771
prenticm@musc.edu

An efficient, exposure-based treatment for PTSD compared to Prolonged Exposure: A non-inferiority randomized trial Save

Date Added
May 7th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00087882
Researcher
Ronald Acierno

List of Studies

Keywords
Anxiety, Depression, Mental Health, Military, Psychiatry, Writing
Summary

PTSD is a prevalent condition for which veterans frequently seek treatment in the VA healthcare system. There are a number of first-line PTSD treatment approaches available, such as Prolonged Exposure and Cognitive Processing Therapy. However, the efficacy rates of these treatments is not as high as what has been observed with civilian populations and approximately 36% of individuals drop out of these treatments prematurely. A proposed alternative to these treatments is Written Exposure Therapy (WET), a brief, 5 session intervention that has been shown to reduce symptoms of PTSD and contribute to lower dropout rates. The goal of this study is to investigate whether WET is as effective compared to Prolonged Exposure (PE) in the treatment of PTSD in a sample of veterans diagnosed with PTSD. It will involve approximately 150 Veterans. This research is funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Stephanie Hart
843-789-6519
zeigls@musc.edu

The Effect of In-bed Electronic Social Media Use on Sleep and Mood in an Adolescent Population: A Survey-Based Study Save

Date Added
February 8th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00080994
Researcher
Jesse Pearce

List of Studies

Keywords
Adolescents, Anxiety, Depression
Summary

This survey based research project will investigate the link between bedtime electronic media use in adolescents and symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress.Subjects will be South Carolina adolescents aged 13-18. Surveys will be administered online and at the AnMed Children's Health Center.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jesse Pearce
8642804790
pearceje@musc.edu

A Phase 2a Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel-Group, Multi-center Study Investigating the Efficacy, Safety, Tolerability and Pharmacokinetics of JNJ-67953964 in Subjects with Major Depressive Disorder. Save

Date Added
January 22nd, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00084417
Researcher
Robert Malcolm

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Depression
Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine if taking JNJ-67953964 (the investigational medication), in addition to a currently prescribed anti-depressant, is useful and safe for treating patients with Major Depressive Disorder. This will be compared to placebo plus subjects' current anti-depressant medication.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Melissa Michel
843-792-1901
michelm@musc.edu

Accelerated Repetitive TMS for Affective Dysfunction: Establishing the Dose-Response Curve Save

Date Added
January 4th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00084111
Researcher
Lisa Mcteague

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Anxiety, Depression
Summary

The goal of this work is to identify the most efficacious range of doses for a short-term (i.e., 1 week) course of high-dose brain stimulation for major depression.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lisa McTeague
843-792-8274
mcteague@musc.edu

Age-related changes in neuroplasticity impede recovery in post-stroke depression: a novel exercise and brain stimulation paradigm to prime neuroplastic potential Save

Date Added
December 4th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00083079
Researcher
Ryan Ross

List of Studies

Keywords
Brain, Depression, Exercise, Stroke, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Stroke affects millions of Americans and is a leading cause of disability. In addition to chronic disability, many survivors experience depressive symptoms such as reductions in mood and motivation. Post-stroke depression (PSD) is associated with poorer recovery from stroke, increased health care costs and higher mortality. Additionally, PSD may interfere with the recovery of the nervous system after stroke. Effective treatment options for PSD are limited and often come with side effects, highlighting the need for alternative treatment approaches. Aerobic exercise (AEx) has positive effects on the nervous system, is a powerful anti-depressant, and has limited side effects, yet remains underutilized in stroke survivors with PSD. This study will examine the short-term effects of AEx on the nervous system in stroke survivors with and without PSD. The results will serve as a foundation for the study of AEx as a treatment for PSD.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Ryan Ross
843-792-3477
rossre@musc.edu

The Psychological Impact of Inter-ICU Transfers Save

Date Added
November 6th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00080530
Researcher
Nandita Nadig

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Anxiety, Depression
Summary

The purpose of this research study is to determine the psychological burden placed on the families of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) who have ventilator-dependent respiratory failure, VDRF, as compared to the burden placed on the families of patients with VDRF who have been transferred from one ICU to another. This study aims to determine if inter-ICU transfer, compared to those who are not transferred, leave patients and families with more symptoms such as of depression, anxiety, and stress. Family members of patients admitted to the ICU will be asked to complete a survey that will last between 20 and 30 minutes. The surveys will be used to evaluate the difference in psychological distress placed on families whose loved ones are directly admitted to the ICU as compared to being transferred from one ICU to another.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Katherine Wallace
(843) 792-4557
wallacka@musc.edu

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