EEG/fMRI Controlled TMS Real-time Neural Feedback in Anti-Depressive Treatment

Date Added
April 7th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00042072
Researcher
Mark George

List of Studies


Keywords
Healthy Volunteer Studies, Mental Health
Summary

This study proposes to design and build a neural imager/stimulator which will let us obtain information about brain circuits and pathways by acquiring electrical and fMRI signals from the brain at the same time. By adding magnetic stimulation to the instrument we will be able to perturb these circuits at precise times and locations in order to both improve how TMS is used as an anti-depression treatment as well as to better understand how our brains function. This research has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of how best to use TMS as a treatment as well as learning how our brains function. This study simply proposes to develop the combined instrument. The use of the new instrument as a anti-depressive treatment will be presented independently after we have developed a working instrument.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Alana McMichael
843-876-2465
EEGTMSproject@musc.edu

Determining the best dose of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT): comparing seizure threshold titration with two different fixed currents (600 mA vs. 900 mA)

Date Added
June 2nd, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00044575
Researcher
Mark George

List of Studies


Keywords
Depression
Summary

Over the past 30 years we have discovered that both the efficacy and the side effects of ECT come not only from the induced seizure, but by the currents of electricity and where they go in the brain. In all patients we now determine, at the first treatment session, the minimum dose of electricity needed to produce a seizure. This is called the seizure threshold. Subsequent treatments are then given at 6 or 9 times this number. The method of titrating has not been fully explored. We propose to titrate with two different currents, one of which is much lower than standard clinical practice. We need to do this twice in each patient, on the first and second treatment sessions, and compare the difference. If we find that that lower currents are paradoxically better, then this will change ECT practice around the world. Patients will receive less overall electricity, with likely fewer side effects.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
John Henderson
843 876 5142
henderjs@musc.edu

Comparison of Propofol and sevoflurane as a primary anesthetic for cardiac ablation of atrial fibrillation.

Date Added
February 16th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00044072
Researcher
George Guldan

List of Studies