Pharmacokinetics of Understudied Drugs Administered to Children per Standard of Care Save

Date Added
May 7th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00077156
Researcher
Lisa Knight

List of Studies

Keywords
Children's Health, Infant, Pediatrics
Summary

The majority of drugs administered to children are used off label and PK studies to define appropriate dosing are lacking across pediatric age groups. Challenges associated with clinical trials in children limit the ability to conduct PK and dosing trials in this population. Studies capitalizing on standard of care procedures have proven successful in characterizing the PK of drugs used in children. The purpose of this study is to characterize the PK of understudied drugs administered to children per standard of care as prescribed by their treating caregiver.
This study will serve as a tool to better understand drug exposure in children receiving drugs per standard of care. The data collected through this initiative will provide valuable PK and dosing information drugs in different pediatric age groups as well as special pediatric populations (i.e. obese).

Institution
Palmetto
Recruitment Contact
Sarah Newman-Norlund
803-216-3377
Sarah.Newman-Norlund@uscmed.sc.edu

Comparison of Length of Stay for Infants with GBS Unknown Mothers with Adequate vs Inadequate Treatment Save

Date Added
April 6th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00077255
Researcher
Rachel Sigrest

List of Studies

Keywords
Children's Health, Disease Prevention, Infant, Non-interventional, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, Pregnancy, Women's Health
Summary

The primary investigators/residents have noted during clinical rotations that a significant number of GBS unknown mothers at SRHS are being treated with intrapartum antibiotics even without the presence of risk factors, presumably to decrease postpartum/neonatal length of stay.
Our study, a retrospective chart review, will determine whether or not length of stay is affected by treating GBS unknown mothers with intrapartum antibiotics in the absence of the aforementioned risk factors.
Potential benefits include the cost-effectiveness of decreased length of stay for these patients as well as decreased exposure to nosocomial infections for neonates. However, antibiotic stewardship and patient safety are also considerations. Another potential option for these patients is rapid GBS testing with PCR which can provide results in 1-2 hours compared with 24-48 hours for the standard culture. PCR is not currently available at SMC.

Institution
Spartanburg
Recruitment Contact
Rachel Sigrest
8643800885
racheljames1985@gmail.com

Effectiveness of continuous nebulization treatment of bronchodilation in patient admitted to PICU diagnosed with acute bronchiolitis Save

Date Added
February 15th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00073193
Researcher
Sami Rishmawi

List of Studies

Keywords
Children's Health, Infant
Summary

Bronchiolitis is broadly defined as a clinical syndrome that occurs in children < 2 years of age and is characterized by upper respiratory symptoms followed by lower respiratory infection with inflammation, which results in wheezing and or crackles (rales). Bronchiolitis typically is caused by viruses. In ICU setting, the standard therapy of patient presents with acute bronchiolitis are bronchodilation medications. Recent recommendations of American Academy of Pediatrics stated that no evidence to support usage of any of bronchodilators,The goal of this study is validate the effectiveness of bronchodilators medications.

Institution
Spartanburg
Recruitment Contact
Sami Rishmawi
8642371109
srishmawi@srhs.com

South Carolina Sickle Cell Disease Access to Care Pilot Program (SC) Save

Date Added
July 19th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00054236
Researcher
Shannon Hudson

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Adolescents, Blood Disorders, Children's Health, Infant
Summary

The purpose of this research protocol is to collect information about individuals living with sickle cell disease to help improve the care of those patients. We hope to understand more about the disease itself, the best ways to treat the disease, and the best ways to help patients with sickle cell disease get care. The goal is to have clinical information about every person diagnosed with sickle cell disease in South Carolina so that we can better treat the disease and help develop new ways to improve outcomes.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Katherine Williams-Turner
843-876-0821
willkat@musc.edu

National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative (NPC-QIC) - A Collaborative Initiative to Improve Care of Children with Complex Congenital Heart Disease Save

Date Added
June 23rd, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00056522
Researcher
Frances Woodard

List of Studies

Keywords
Cardiovascular, Children's Health, Heart, Infant, Non-interventional
Summary

Transforming health care and outcomes for children with rare diseases is difficult within the current health care system. There is great variation in care delivery, inadequate and slow application of existing evidence, and ineffective use of available data to generate new knowledge. Individual care centers have inadequate numbers of patients for robust learning and improvement. In order to redesign the system, changes must take place at multiple levels, including the patient and family, clinician, practice and the network. The purpose of this project is to design, develop, and test further refinements to an improvement and research network focused on HLHS, the most severe congenital heart defect, and to use a registry to simultaneously improve clinical care, redesign care delivery systems and to conduct quality improvement, health services, outcomes, and comparative effectiveness research. The purpose of this initiative, specifically, is to improve care and outcomes for infants with HLHS by: 1) expanding the established NPC-QIC national registry to gather clinical care process, outcome, and developmental data on infants with HLHS between diagnosis and 12 months of age, 2) improving implementation of consensus standards, tested by teams, into everyday practice across pediatric cardiology centers, and 3) engaging parents as partners in improving care and outcomes. We utilize a quality improvement methodology, known as the adapted learning collaborative model, which expedites the implementation of tools and strategies that facilitate changes such as systematic care coordination, cardiovascular monitoring, and nutritional monitoring into every day practice. The NPC-QIC registry is used to document the impact of these changes on various care processes and outcomes (e.g., mortality rate, readmissions, and weight gain).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Frances Woodard
843-792-3292
klinefl@musc.edu

Analysis of genetic variant and treatment based variations in infants at risk for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) Save

Date Added
July 31st, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00041164
Researcher
Lakshmi Katikaneni

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Children's Health, Genetics, Infant, Vision/ Eye
Summary

Infants born early who are in the neonatal intensive care unit will be included if they meet national guidelines for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) screening exams. Informed consent will be given to the parent(s) or legal guardians. 1.5-2 ml of blood will be drawn from a vein when the child is enrolled in the study and may be drawn again if the child requires treatment of eye disease. A cheek swab will also be obtained. These biologic samples will be shipped overnight to the University of Utah for genetic analysis. Analysis will determine if a change in gene expression causes retinopathy of prematurity. Infants enrolled in the study will be followed clinically per established ROP screening guidelines. They will not require additional study exams.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Kinsey Shirer
843-792-2799
evanssa@musc.edu

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