Reduced Pressure Reaming versus Standard Reaming for the Treatment of Impending Pathologic Femur Fractures Save

Date Added
January 16th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00063851
Researcher
Lee Leddy

Silhouette
Keywords
Bone, Cancer, Cancer/Lymphoma, Cancer/Myeloma, Cancer/Other, Cancer/Sarcoma, Surgery
Summary

This study is for patients that have suffered a femur fracture due to metastatic cancer. The standard of care for this type of fracture is to stabilize the bone with an intramedullary nail. When preparing the femur for the nail, pressure can cause fat to enter the bloodstream and travel to the heart, causing heart and lung complications. The procedure being investigated in this study is called reduced pressure reaming. In this procedure the surgeon will use a device with suction when preparing the bone for the nail in order to decrease pressure and decrease the amount of fat that enters the bloodstream. Patients will be randomly assigned to either the standard preparation (standard reaming), or the reduced pressure preparation (reduced pressure reaming). After surgery, both treatment groups will followed according to standard practices at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Robert McClam
843-792-7238
mcclamr@musc.edu

Evaluating race specific AGE accumulation as a behavioral biomarker that can reflect optimal health in prostate cancer survivors Save

Date Added
December 19th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00071004
Researcher
David Turner

Silhouette
Keywords
Cancer/Other, Exercise, Obesity
Summary

As our bodies use the sugars that we consume for energy they generate waste chemicals known as metabolites. One such group of metabolites is known as advanced glycation end products or AGEs for short. Critically apart from their production as a result of sugar breakdown, AGE levels in the body are also increased by the foods that we eat and when we do not get enough exercise. AGEs may cause many of the side effects experienced by prostate cancer survivors. This study aims to examine the effects of diet change and exercise on AGE levels in prostate cancer survivors.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
David Turner
843-876-2309
turnerda@musc.edu

A 5-year Longitudinal Observational Study of the Natural History and Management of Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma Save

Date Added
February 28th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00062918
Researcher
David Koch

Silhouette
Keywords
Cancer, Cancer/Gastrointestinal, Cancer/Other, Digestive System, Genetics, Liver, Obesity, Weight Control
Summary

TARGET-HCC is a 5-year, longitudinal, observational study of the natural history and management of patients with HCC. The study will address important clinical questions that remain unanswered in the management of HCC with a unique research registry of participants with HCC from academic and community real-world practices. TARGET-HCC is disease focused, not drug specific, which allows for continuous acquisition of real-world evidence regarding the natural history, management, and outcomes of treatment with current therapies and new treatments that may be utilized in usual clinical practice.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Francis Beylotte
843-876-4273
beylott@musc.edu

URCC 14040: A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing the Effectiveness of Yoga, Survivorship Health Education, and Cognitive Behavioral therapy for Treating Insomnia in Cancer Survivors Save

Date Added
March 15th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00053106
Researcher
Jeffrey Giguere
Keywords
Cancer, Cancer/Brain, Cancer/Breast, Cancer/Gastrointestinal, Cancer/Genitourinary, Cancer/Gynecological, Cancer/Head & Neck, Cancer/Leukemia, Cancer/Lung, Cancer/Lymphoma, Cancer/Myeloma, Cancer/Other, Cancer/Sarcoma, Cancer/Skin, Education, Exercise, Sleep Disorders
Summary

This research study is for patients who have completed all scheduled surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy for their cancer within the last 6-12 months and are currently having some type of sleep disturbance. While there is no standard treatment for sleep disturbance for cancer survivors, people who do not take part in this study may take over-the-counter or prescription medications, receive cognitive behavioral therapy, or exercise as a means of attempting to manage their sleep problems.

Sleep disturbance, particularly insomnia, is a common problem for cancer survivors. Insomnia can be described as excessive daytime napping, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or waking up earlier than you would like. Insomnia can increase fatigue, impair physical function, impair immune function, cause circadian rhythms (known as your biological clock) to be disrupted and decrease quality of life.

Because there is no ideal standard of care for effectively treating sleep problems in cancer survivors, the purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of three different treatments for improving sleep problems and determine which is best. The three treatments are yoga, survivorship health education, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-I).

Study participation will be approximately 8 months.

Institution
Greenville
Recruitment Contact
Gina Norris
864-242-2762
gnorris@ghs.org

WFU 97115 - A Phase III Prospective Randomized Trial of Acupuncture for Treatment of Radiation-Induced Xerostomia in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer Save

Date Added
January 19th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00050521
Researcher
David Grisell
Keywords
Cancer, Cancer/Head & Neck, Cancer/Other
Summary

This research study is for patients who have xerostomia (dry mouth) caused by radiation treatment received in the past for cancer.

The purposed of this study is to determine whether or not acupuncture can improve symptoms related to dry mouth due to head/neck radiotherapy.

Eligible participants will be randomized (assigned by a computer) to one of three groups: the standard of care group (group where usual care for dry mouth is given) or to one of two acupuncture groups. One of the acupuncture treatment approaches has not been studied in a large randomized trial and may not target symptoms. Each group is equally important in the trial. All groups play an important role in helping to determine if acupuncture helps decrease symptoms of dry mouth.

Participation will last up to 9 months. About 240 people will be enrolled in this trial.

Institution
Greenville
Recruitment Contact
Gina Norris
864-242-2762
GNorris@ghs.org

WFU 01213 - Reducing Lung Cancer Survivors' Anxiety and Dyspnea (RELAX) Save

Date Added
December 15th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00050437
Researcher
Mark O'rourke
Keywords
Anxiety, Breathing, Cancer, Cancer/Lung, Cancer/Other, Lung, Mental Health, Pulmonary, Shortness of Breath
Summary

Patients who have had lung cancer and are experiencing anxiety and possibly shortness of breath may be eligible to participate in the this study.

If you take part in this study, you will be randomized into one of the three study groups described below. Randomization means that you are put into a group by chance. It is like flipping a coin. You will have an equal chance of being placed in any group.

Group A: Will receive a device that will gradually slow down breathing rate. It plays music through headphones and has a sensor that attaches to your abdomen or chest. You will be asked to use it once per day for 15 minutes, at least 5 days per week, for 12 weeks.
Group B: Will receive a device that will gradually slow down breathing rate. It plays music through headphones and has a sensor that attaches to your abdomen or chest. You will be asked to use it twice per day for 15 minutes, at least 5 days per week, for 12 weeks.
Group C: Will receive a device that will leave your breathing rate at a similar rate that you usually breathe. It plays chimes through headphones and has a sensor that attaches to your abdomen or chest. You will be asked to use it once per day for 15 minutes, at least 5 days a week for 12 weeks.

Study participation lasts about 12 weeks.

Institution
Greenville
Recruitment Contact
Gina Norris
864-242-2762
GNorris@ghs.org

A Phase II Trial of Nifurtimox for Refractory or Relapsed Neuroblastoma and Relapsed Medulloblastoma Save

Date Added
October 5th, 2010
PRO Number
Pro00007324
Researcher
Jacqueline Kraveka

Silhouette
Keywords
Cancer/Brain, Cancer/Other, Pediatrics
Summary

The study is being done to test how well nifurtimox works against neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma in children. Early observation and testing suggest that nifurtimox has effect against these types of cancer. Nifurtimox is well tolerated by children and doesn't seem to have long term side effects when used to treat Chagas' disease. The goal of the study is to learn if nifurtimox in combination with other chemotherapy drugs is effective in shrinking/killing neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma cells.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Elizabeth Rackoff
843-792-3379
rackoffe@musc.edu

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