Empowering Rural Teens through Photovoice to Influence the Health of their Community Save

Date Added
July 28th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00067937
Researcher
Michelle Nichols
Keywords
Adolescents, Disease Prevention, Environmental Factors, Ethnicity and Disease, Exercise, Minorities, Non-interventional, Nutrition, Obesity
Summary

This study will recruit adolescents who are enrolled in a Teen Health Careers Program to participate in a community-engaged study. This study will seek to understand the barriers and facilitators to physical activity and nutritious foods throughout their daily lives. Adolescents will use take digital images to capture aspects of their daily lives using photography.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Michelle Nichols
(843) 792-1802
nicholmg@musc.edu

The Impact of False Positive Mammography Results on Breast Cancer Screening Intention in Black Women Save

Date Added
February 22nd, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00049656
Researcher
Deeonna Farr
Keywords
Cancer/Breast, Ethnicity and Disease, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Minorities, Women's Health
Summary

The purpose of this project is to understand how characteristics of mammography facilities, mammography providers, and individual patients influence Black women?s experiences receiving an initial abnormal mammography is determined to be non-cancerous (false positive result). Observations, recordings, surveys and interviews will be used to collect information regarding the various influences on Black women?s experience with a false positive mammography result and their intentions to complete future screening mammograms.

Institution
Palmetto
Recruitment Contact
Deeonna Farr
803-777-7641
farrde@email.sc.edu

Race and Ethnicity Collection in the VA Health System Save

Date Added
December 4th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00046313
Researcher
Mulugeta Gebregziabher
Keywords
Ethnicity and Disease, Minorities
Summary

Although race is one of the most important social determinants of health care and outcomes in the United States, missing data on race/ethnicity is common in the VAMC. Therefore, the primary objective of this project is to understand collection and analysis of missing race/ethnicity data in the VA. We aim to better understand the patient perspective and attitudes surrounding race/ethnicity collection, and obtain information in order to inform collection methods.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aleatha Fields
843-789-6875
Aleatha.Fields@va.gov

Gene Discoveries in Subjects with Crohn?s Disease of African Descent Save

Date Added
September 2nd, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00034427
Researcher
Jose Quiros
Keywords
Bowel, Children's Health, Crohn's Disease, Digestive System, Ethnicity and Disease, Genetics, Minorities, Pediatrics
Summary

A minimum of 1000 AA subjects with IBD will be recruited in the 4 year period; from Emory, Grady and Children?s Healthcare of Atlanta. And a total of 2500 patients form the collaborating institutions.

The primary investigative design will be a paired case-control study. This study will be similar to other IRB approved protocols in which DNA, serum, are collected from children and adults with and without IBD for the purpose of genotype analysis.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Mohammed Al Gadban
843-792-4837
algadban@musc.edu

Physician Order for Scope of Treatment (POST): PILOT STUDY Save

Date Added
August 6th, 2013
PRO Number
Pro00022252
Researcher
Walter Limehouse
Keywords
Aging, Alzheimers, Cancer, Dementia, Ethnicity and Disease, Geriatrics, Heart, HIV / AIDS, Infectious Diseases, Kidney, Liver, Men's Health, Minorities, Nervous System, Pulmonary, Rare Diseases, Women's Health
Summary

South Carolina Coalition for Care of Serious Illness (SCC CSI) sponsors development of Physician Orders for Scope of Treatment (POST) in South Carolina. The SC POST follows the national POLST (www. polst.org) paradigm creating an advance treatment planning physician order that migrates as valid across institutional boundaries: from physician office, to home/nursing home/hospice to EMS to hospital emergency/inpatient services. The POST form encourages a conversation between a physician and the patient regarding treatment options available to seriously ill patients for whom death within a year would not be a surprise. These choices primarily include whether to attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the event of cardiac or pulmonary arrest or not (a ?DNR? or ?Allow Natural Death? order) and whether during acute illness to provide full treatment including endotracheal intubation and intensive care, supportive treatment such as noninvasive ventilation and no intensive care, or comfort care only. The Charleston and Greenville areas will pilot POST. Investigators by area will survey providers completing POST documents for patients or treating patients with POST about the utility of this form and how use of the form affected their patient's treatment. A chart reviews of patients presenting with a POST form to a hospital emergency or inpatient unit will address whether providers respected patient treatment choices. SCC CSI plans to publish the results of the pilot in appropriate journals and present the results at medical meetings and to interested persons. The results of the study may provide the supporting documentation for subsequent legislation supporting POST. POST represents a coordinated statement of a seriously ill patient?s treatment choices to be honored across multiple treatment settings.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Walter Limehouse
792-9705
limehouw@musc.edu

Racial Disparities in Sepsis: The Role of Immunological Heterogeneity Save

Date Added
June 18th, 2013
PRO Number
Pro00025452
Researcher
Andrew Goodwin
Keywords
Ethnicity and Disease, Genetics, Inflammation, Minorities
Summary

Disparities in sepsis incidence and outcomes have been identified between blacks and whites. While some of these disparities can likely be attributed to socio-demographic factors including socio-economic status, education level, and access to healthcare, existing data suggests that other factors, including biological differences, may contribute to the observed disparities. The innate immune system is an integral component of the body's mechanism for fighting off infection and has been identified as a site for numerous racial heterogeneities. The RADIUS study seeks to identify both black and white patients admitted in an intensive care unit with sepsis. A single blood sample will be collected from each enrolled subject to be used for quantitative analysis of cytokine levels as well as for genotyping for a specific single nucleotide polymoprhism. These cytokines and the polymorphism are related to the innate immune system response to infection. Simultaneously, clinical and demographic information will be recorded from each enrolled subject so that cytokine levels and polymorphism presence can be correlated with clinical outcomes while controlling for socio-demographic variables.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Ashley Warden
843-792-4349
jonesash@musc.edu

The Multidisciplinary Clinical Research Center for Rheumatic Diseases in African Americans Save

Date Added
January 15th, 2013
PRO Number
Pro00021985
Researcher
Gary Gilkeson
Keywords
Autoimmune disease, Environmental Factors, Ethnicity and Disease, Genetics, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Lupus, Minorities, Rare Diseases, Scleroderma
Summary

Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus; SLE) and Systemic Sclerosis (scleroderma; SSc) are relatively rare rheumatic diseases that disproportionately impact the African American community, and particularly African American women. The causes of lupus and scleroderma are unknown, but thought to include both genetic and environmental factors. We are enrolling lupus and scleroderma patients, and healthy control subjects. This is not a drug study. The purpose of this study is to better understand the factors that predispose people to develop lupus and scleroderma. Information about medical, social and family history, medications, physical exam findings, and laboratory tests will be collected for analysis. This study will involve approximately 910 volunteers.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Stephanie Slan
843-792-8997
slans@musc.edu

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Gullah Health (SLEIGH) Save

Date Added
October 5th, 2009
IRB Number
10852
Researcher
Diane Kamen
Keywords
Autoimmune disease, Children's Health, Environmental Factors, Ethnicity and Disease, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Immune System, Joint, Kidney, Lupus, Minorities, Non-interventional, Vitamin D, Women's Health
Summary

The Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) in Gullah Health, or SLEIGH, study is an observational study enrolling African Americans from the Sea Island communities of South Carolina and Georgia. We are enrolling patients, family members of patients, and unrelated community members. SLE is a potentially severe disease that can affect the entire body. SLE is more common in African Americans than Caucasians. The main purpose of this study is to find genes that, along with factors from the environment, result in the development of SLE. Volunteers in SLEIGH will be asked to answer questions about their health and have blood and urine collected for tests. After the first visit there may be one additional visit 2 or more years later. This is not a drug study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Stephanie Slan
843-792-8997
slans@musc.edu

Change_preferences

-- OR --

Create_login