Impact of Disparities in Food Security on Glycemic Control and Health Care Utilization Among Youth and Young Adults with Diabetes Save

Date Added
March 19th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00075894
Researcher
Angela Liese
Keywords
Adolescents, Diabetes, Environmental Factors, Ethnicity and Disease, Nutrition
Summary

Many youth and young adults (YYAs) with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), particularly those of minority race/ethnicity, do not achieve optimal glycemic control and household food insecurity (HFI) may be a key barrier. HFI is the limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods. The SEARCH Food Security (SFS) cohort study is designed as an ancillary study to the ongoing NIH/NIDDK-funded SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth 4 Cohort study. The aims of the SFS study are to (1) Initiate a food insecurity cohort study of 1,187 YYAs aged 15-35 years (53% minority) with T1D and T2D by adding two data collection time points to the ongoing SEARCH 4 study in three of the five SEARCH sites, including South Carolina, Colorado and Washington; (2) Evaluate how HFI influences changes in glycemic control in YYAs with T1D and T2D; (3) Identify the pathways through which food insecurity may act; and (4) Evaluate the influence of HFI on changes in health care utilization and medical and non-medical health care costs in YYAs with T1D and T2D.

Institution
Greenville
Recruitment Contact
Jessica Stucker
803-777-1961
jstucker@mailbox.sc.edu

Gene Discoveries in Subjects with Crohn's Disease of African Descent Save

Date Added
September 2nd, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00034427
Researcher
Jose Quiros

Silhouette
Keywords
Bowel, Children's Health, Crohn's Disease, Digestive System, Ethnicity and Disease, Genetics, Minorities, Pediatrics
Summary

A minimum of 1000 AA subjects with IBD will be recruited in the 4 year period; from Emory, Grady and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. And a total of 2500 patients form the collaborating institutions.

The primary investigative design will be a paired case-control study. This study will be similar to other IRB approved protocols in which DNA, serum, are collected from children and adults with and without IBD for the purpose of genotype analysis.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Mohammed Al Gadban
843-792-4837
algadban@musc.edu

Racial Disparities in Sepsis: The Role of Immunological Heterogeneity Save

Date Added
June 18th, 2013
PRO Number
Pro00025452
Researcher
Andrew Goodwin

Silhouette
Keywords
Ethnicity and Disease, Genetics, Inflammation, Minorities
Summary

Disparities in sepsis incidence and outcomes have been identified between blacks and whites. While some of these disparities can likely be attributed to socio-demographic factors including socio-economic status, education level, and access to healthcare, existing data suggests that other factors, including biological differences, may contribute to the observed disparities. The innate immune system is an integral component of the body's mechanism for fighting off infection and has been identified as a site for numerous racial heterogeneities. The RADIUS study seeks to identify both black and white patients admitted in an intensive care unit with sepsis. A single blood sample will be collected from each enrolled subject to be used for quantitative analysis of cytokine levels as well as for genotyping for a specific single nucleotide polymoprhism. These cytokines and the polymorphism are related to the innate immune system response to infection. Simultaneously, clinical and demographic information will be recorded from each enrolled subject so that cytokine levels and polymorphism presence can be correlated with clinical outcomes while controlling for socio-demographic variables.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Ashley Warden
843-792-4349
jonesash@musc.edu

The Core Center for Clinical Research, Improving Minority Health in Rheumatic Diseases Save

Date Added
January 15th, 2013
PRO Number
Pro00021985
Researcher
Gary Gilkeson

Silhouette
Keywords
Autoimmune disease, Environmental Factors, Ethnicity and Disease, Genetics, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Lupus, Minorities, Rare Diseases, Scleroderma
Summary

Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus; SLE) and Systemic Sclerosis (scleroderma; SSc) are relatively rare rheumatic diseases that disproportionately impact the African American community, and particularly African American women. The causes of lupus and scleroderma are unknown, but thought to include both genetic and environmental factors. We are enrolling lupus and scleroderma patients, and healthy control subjects. This is not a drug study. The purpose of this study is to better understand the factors that predispose people to develop lupus and scleroderma. Information about medical, social and family history, medications, physical exam findings, and laboratory tests will be collected for analysis. This study will involve approximately 1360 volunteers.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Stephanie Slan
843-792-8997
slans@musc.edu

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Gullah Health (SLEIGH) Save

Date Added
October 5th, 2009
IRB Number
10852
Researcher
Diane Kamen

Silhouette
Keywords
Autoimmune disease, Children's Health, Environmental Factors, Ethnicity and Disease, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Immune System, Joint, Kidney, Lupus, Minorities, Non-interventional, Vitamin D, Women's Health
Summary

The Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) in Gullah Health, or SLEIGH, study is an observational study enrolling African Americans from the Sea Island communities of South Carolina and Georgia. We are enrolling patients, family members of patients, and unrelated community members. SLE is a potentially severe disease that can affect the entire body. SLE is more common in African Americans than Caucasians. The main purpose of this study is to find genes that, along with factors from the environment, result in the development of SLE. Volunteers in SLEIGH will be asked to answer questions about their health and have blood and urine collected for tests. After the first visit there may be one additional visit 2 or more years later. This is not a drug study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Stephanie Slan
843-792-8997
slans@musc.edu

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