Does Perioperative Goal Directed Therapy using Flotrac Improve Outcomes in Esophagectomy Patients Save

Date Added
May 17th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00045623
Researcher
George Guldan
Keywords
Cancer, Esophagus, Surgery
Summary

This research study will include patients undergoing esophagectomy. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of using a FDA approved monitor, the FloTrac monitor, to help determine how much fluid and blood pressure medications a patient receives during surgery to maintain a stable blood pressure.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Wanda Jones
843-792-1869
joneswr@musc.edu

Do changes in esophageal intrabolus pressure predict clinical and endoscopic response to therapy in eosinophilic esophagitis? Save

Date Added
January 28th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00051187
Researcher
Steven Clayton
Keywords
Esophagus
Summary

Eosinophilic esophagitis is understood to be a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the presence of esophageal eosinophilia in the clinic context of dysphagia. This disease has been further categorized into predominantly fibrostenotic and inflammatory phenotypes. It is believed that these two subtypes may represent a continuum of change and disease progression of the esophagus; with fibrostenotic changes developing over time. We have demonstrated in another study that intrabolus pressure as obtained via high resolution esophageal manometry can reliably differentiate these two subtypes. It is our hypothesis that intrabolus pressure may not only serve as a novel tool to differentiate these subtypes, but may serve as a novel objective marker to assess overall clinical severity of this disease. After thorough review of the current literature, there have yet been no studies demonstrating a reliable diagnostic modality to accomplish this objective. A novel prognostic marker would help further our understanding of eosinophilic esophagitis and help guide more focused management.

Institution
Greenville
Recruitment Contact
Steven Clayton
8644552044
sclayton@ghs.org

The Effect of Voluntary Pharyngeal Swallowing Maneuvers on Esophageal Swallowing Physiology in Patients with Dysphagia Save

Date Added
March 4th, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00030431
Researcher
Ashli O'rourke
Keywords
Digestive System, Esophagus
Summary

In this study, patients undergoing a Modified Barium Swallowing Study (MBSS) will also have a high resolution pharyngeal and esophageal manometry catheter in place to measure the pressures generated by the throat (pharynx) and esophagus (food pipe) during swallowing. Certain swallowing behaviors (such as performing an "effortful swallow") will be done to see how these behaviors might affect the swallowing mechanism as a whole.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Ashli O'Rourke
843-876-0112
aorourke@musc.edu

Assessment of Optimal Time to Repeat Endoscopy Following Primary or Secondary Prophylaxis of Esophageal Varices with Band Ligation: A Randomized, Prospective Trial Save

Date Added
July 16th, 2013
PRO Number
Pro00027001
Researcher
Don Rockey
Keywords
Circulation, Digestive System, Esophagus, Liver, Vascular
Summary

This study is to find the best time that a follow up appointment can be scheduled to benefit the patient with liver cirrohis to return after having the bleeding vessels in the esophagus repaired by directing a scope in the esophagus and using bands to stop the bleeding.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Yusuf Shami
843-876-8439
shami@musc.edu

Octreotide Duration Study Save

Date Added
July 16th, 2013
PRO Number
Pro00027015
Researcher
Don Rockey
Keywords
Digestive System, Esophagus, Liver, Vascular
Summary

The study will compare two durations of treatment with Octreotide in patients with confirmed esophageal variceal hemorrhage who have undergone successful endoscopy and possible endoscopic therapy for control of bleeding. All procedures including the treatment are the standard of care. Octreotide infusion and endoscopic therapy for esophageal variceal bleeding with esophageal banding, hemoclipping, and/or saline and/or ethanolamine injection are not investigational.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Mary Hart
843-876-8439
hartmm@musc.edu

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