Reduced Pressure Reaming versus Standard Reaming for the Treatment of Impending Pathologic Femur Fractures Save

Date Added
January 16th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00063851
Researcher
Lee Leddy

Silhouette
Keywords
Bone, Cancer, Cancer/Lymphoma, Cancer/Myeloma, Cancer/Other, Cancer/Sarcoma, Surgery
Summary

This study is for patients that have suffered a femur fracture due to metastatic cancer. The standard of care for this type of fracture is to stabilize the bone with an intramedullary nail. When preparing the femur for the nail, pressure can cause fat to enter the bloodstream and travel to the heart, causing heart and lung complications. The procedure being investigated in this study is called reduced pressure reaming. In this procedure the surgeon will use a device with suction when preparing the bone for the nail in order to decrease pressure and decrease the amount of fat that enters the bloodstream. Patients will be randomly assigned to either the standard preparation (standard reaming), or the reduced pressure preparation (reduced pressure reaming). After surgery, both treatment groups will followed according to standard practices at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Robert McClam
843-792-7238
mcclamr@musc.edu

A Randomized Phase III Study Comparing Conventional Dose Treatment Using a Combination of Lenalidomide, Bortezomib and Dexamethasone (RVD) to High-Dose Treatment with Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant in the Initial Management of Myeloma in Patients up to 65 Years of Age Save

Date Added
November 16th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00073063
Researcher
Tondre Buck
Keywords
Cancer, Cancer/Myeloma, Drug Studies
Summary

In this research study, we are looking to explore the drug combination, lenalidomide, bortezomib and dexamethasone alone or when combined with autologous stem cell transplantation to see what side effects it may have and how well it works for treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Specifically, the objective of this trial is to determine if, in the era of novel drugs, high dose therapy (HDT) is still necessary in the initial management of multiple myeloma in younger patients. In this study, HDT as compared to conventional dose treatment would be considered superior if it significantly prolongs progression-free survival by at least 9 months or more, recognizing that particular subgroups may benefit more compared to others.

Institution
Spartanburg
Recruitment Contact
Clinical Research Department
1-800-486-5941
research@srhs.com

Multicenter Phase II, Double-blind Placebo Controlled Trial of Maintenance Ixazomib after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for High Risk Multiple Myeloma Save

Date Added
December 20th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00061291
Researcher
Amarendra Neppalli

Silhouette
Keywords
Cancer/Myeloma
Summary

This study is for adult patients who have high risk myeloma (MM), a cancer of the plasma cells that begins in their bone marro OR their MM returned after an autologous transplant. The study is being done to learn if maintenance treatment (chemotherapy) works better to control your disease than placebo.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
HCC Clinical Trials Office
843-792-9321
hcc-clinical-trials@musc.edu

URCC 14040: A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing the Effectiveness of Yoga, Survivorship Health Education, and Cognitive Behavioral therapy for Treating Insomnia in Cancer Survivors Save

Date Added
March 15th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00053106
Researcher
Jeffrey Giguere
Keywords
Cancer, Cancer/Brain, Cancer/Breast, Cancer/Gastrointestinal, Cancer/Genitourinary, Cancer/Gynecological, Cancer/Head & Neck, Cancer/Leukemia, Cancer/Lung, Cancer/Lymphoma, Cancer/Myeloma, Cancer/Other, Cancer/Sarcoma, Cancer/Skin, Education, Exercise, Sleep Disorders
Summary

This research study is for patients who have completed all scheduled surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy for their cancer within the last 6-12 months and are currently having some type of sleep disturbance. While there is no standard treatment for sleep disturbance for cancer survivors, people who do not take part in this study may take over-the-counter or prescription medications, receive cognitive behavioral therapy, or exercise as a means of attempting to manage their sleep problems.

Sleep disturbance, particularly insomnia, is a common problem for cancer survivors. Insomnia can be described as excessive daytime napping, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or waking up earlier than you would like. Insomnia can increase fatigue, impair physical function, impair immune function, cause circadian rhythms (known as your biological clock) to be disrupted and decrease quality of life.

Because there is no ideal standard of care for effectively treating sleep problems in cancer survivors, the purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of three different treatments for improving sleep problems and determine which is best. The three treatments are yoga, survivorship health education, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-I).

Study participation will be approximately 8 months.

Institution
Greenville
Recruitment Contact
Gina Norris
864-242-2762
gnorris@ghs.org

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