EEG/fMRI Controlled TMS Real-time Neural Feedback in Anti-Depressive Treatment

Date Added
April 7th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00042072
Researcher
Truman Brown

List of Studies


Keywords
Healthy Volunteer Studies, Mental Health
Summary

This study proposes to design and build a neural imager/stimulator which will let us obtain information about brain circuits and pathways by acquiring electrical and fMRI signals from the brain at the same time. By adding magnetic stimulation to the instrument we will be able to perturb these circuits at precise times and locations in order to both improve how TMS is used as an anti-depression treatment as well as to better understand how our brains function. This research has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of how best to use TMS as a treatment as well as learning how our brains function. This study simply proposes to develop the combined instrument. The use of the new instrument as a anti-depressive treatment will be presented independently after we have developed a working instrument.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Alana McMichael
843-876-2465
EEGTMSproject@musc.edu

Safety and Efficacy of the Tao Facemask for Positive Pressure Ventilation in the Patients with Significantly Elevated BMIs

Date Added
February 20th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00073465
Researcher
Tod Brown

List of Studies


Keywords
Surgery
Summary

This study will compare the safety and effectiveness of a new facemask, the Tao mask, as compared to the standard mask for manual ventilation of patients with BMIs of 40 or greater who are undergoing elective surgery. The Tao mask and the standard mask will both be used for each patient but the order of evaluating the masks will be randomized.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Wanda Jones
843-792-1869
joneswr@musc.edu

Sex Differences in the Effects of Early Childhood Adversity on Laboratory-Induced Stress and Craving among Individuals with Opioid Use Disorder

Date Added
February 2nd, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00104087
Researcher
Delisa Brown

List of Studies


Keywords
Drug Studies, Pain, Psychiatry, Stress Disorders, Substance Use
Summary

This study will examine the effects of early childhood adversity on stress and craving among individuals with opioid use disorder. Study participants will complete a total of three visits, including a 1-month follow-up visit. Participants will be asked to complete questionnaires about thier mood, anxiety, drug use, craving and adverse childhood events. They will listen to personalized scripts about a stressful situation, a time when they used opioid and a relaxing situation and their heart rate, skin conductance and cortisol are measured.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Delisa Brown
843-792-2388
browdg@musc.edu



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