OUTCOMES OF PATIENTS WITH AUTOLOGUS MID-URETHRAL SLING AFTER FAILURE OF MID-URETHRAL MESH SLING

Date Added
June 29th, 2012
PRO Number
Pro00012059
Researcher
Eric Rovner

List of Studies


Keywords
Urinary
Summary

Mid-urethral slings have been widely accepted as a treatment of choice for patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Mid-Urethral sling surgery has been associated with good success rate and minimal morbidity.Minor complications are associated with these surgeries including bladder perforation, urethral injury or post operative complication such as de novo urgency and urge urinary incontinence, urinary retention or incomplete bladder emptying. Treatment approaches for complications included sling excision and urethral/bladder/ vaginal defect repair after sling intrusion or extrusion into these organs. Treatments for postoperative voiding dysfunction include clean intermittent catheterization, mid-urethral sling lysis, sling incision and formal urethrolysis. With urethrolysis, obstruction has been reported to be relieved in 65% to 93 with preservation of continence in 80% to 100% while the rate of SUI postoperative is 0 % to 19%.autologus fascial sling for relieve of obstruction with 54% of patients had no recurrence of their SUI [25]. On the other hand, there have been no published data on the use of autologus fascia lata pubovaginal sling to treat patient with recurrent SUI after incision of the mid-urethral mish slings. Urethral injection of bulking agent have been reported with 34% cure [26] and re-do mid urethral sling was reported to have only 53% success over 17 months of follow-up [9].
Our aim is to evaluate the subjective and objective outcomes of salvage treatment of failed mid-urethral mesh sling with sling incision, urethrolysis, autologus facial pubovaginal sling or other forms of diversion if needed. We also will evaluate if this procedure will help to improve in the quality of life of these patients.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jessica Jenkins
843-876-0630
ude.csum@njiknej

Determine the effect of cultured endothelial progenitor cells from normal human cord blood on the protection of mice from cecal ligation puncture -induced sepsis.

Date Added
March 19th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00042294
Researcher
Eugene Chang

List of Studies


Keywords
Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pregnancy, Women's Health
Summary

The purpose of this study is to study cells that are found in the cord blood of pregnant women to see if they might be helpful in treating certain types of infections. This type of research is still in the very early stage, so we will do this by taking some of the special cells found in cord blood and injecting them into mice and studying them.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Tamara Jenkins
843.792.6992
saundert@musc.edu

A Prospective investigation of DOSS exposure during pregnancy and potential lipophilic alterations in offspring.

Date Added
September 21st, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00046776
Researcher
Demetri Spyropoulos

List of Studies


Keywords
Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pregnancy, Women's Health
Summary

The purpose of this study is to look at the how the use of products that contain a certain chemical compound Docusate, commonly referred to as DOSS, may have on pregnant women and their babies. DOSS is used in many commercially available products, such as pesticides, personal care products, and laxatives. This study will focus on DOSS and the use of Colace which is a commonly prescribed stool softener used in pregnancy. This study will involve pregnant women who are being admitted into MUSC's Labor and Delivery unit.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Tamara Jenkins
843.792.6992
saundert@musc.edu

Clinical Evaluation of a Vascular Venous Anastomotic Connector for Minimally Invasive Connection of an Arteriovenous Graft for Hemodialysis [InterGraft Study]

Date Added
April 23rd, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00087325
Researcher
Vinayak Rohan

List of Studies


Keywords
Kidney
Summary

The InterGraft Vascular Venous Anastomotic Connector (VIG) was developed for minimally invasive anastomosis (connection) of a vein to a standard, currently sold synthetic graft for hemodialysis. The VIG is designed with a nitinol (metal) frame that is covered with a plastic material called expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, or ePTFE. The ‘vein end' of the VIG is placed within the vein using a special catheter delivery system that is inserted into the vein through a small needle puncture. The ‘graft end' of the VIG is fitted into the graft that is placed under the skin using standard methods. The purpose of this research study is to determine the safety and effectiveness of InterGraft Venous Anastomotic Connector for connecting a hemodialysis graft to a vein.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Tamara Jenkins
843-792-1851
saundert@musc.edu

A 12-month, open-label, multicenter, randomized, safety, efficacy, pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) study of two regimens of anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody, CFZ533 vs. standard of care control, in adult de novo liver transplant recipients with a 12-month additional follow-up and a long-term extension (CONTRAIL I)

Date Added
February 25th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00089195
Researcher
Derek DuBay

List of Studies


Keywords
Liver, Transplant
Summary

This study is testing an investigational (not yet FDA approved) drug called CFZ533 compared to standard of care anti-rejection medications in patients who are having a Liver transplant. This study drug is being tested because it may have fewer long-term side effects than current standard therapy. This study is for first time liver transplant patients. Study drug will be administered every 2 weeks and participation will last for up to 6 years after transplant surgery.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Tamara Jenkins
843-792-1851
saundert@musc.edu

A prospective efficacy study comparing FREquency of use and Efficacy of a personalized surgery-free wearable and personalized bladder modulation system with objective confirmation of nerve activation for use in the home by subjects with OverActive Bladder syndrome

Date Added
December 8th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00103694
Researcher
Eric Rovner

List of Studies


Keywords
Bladder
Summary

The purpose of this research study is to compare the effectiveness of one treatment per week to three treatments per week using the non-surgical bladder modulation system for those diagnosed with OverActive bladder syndrome (OAB) in the home environment. Subjects Male or Female over the age of 18 with a diagnosis of Overactive bladder who meet all inclusion and no exclusion criteria will be eligible to enroll in a new study. This study will test a new surgey free wearable and personalized bladder modulation system.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jessica Jenkins
843876-0630
jenkijn@musc.edu

Combining taVNS with early CIMT to improve health outcomes of infants

Date Added
May 4th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00109558
Researcher
Dorothea Jenkins

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Infant, Movement Disorders, Physical Therapy, Stroke Recovery
Summary

Newborns who are born premature or suffer brain injury at birth are at risk for motor problems that may cause weakness in reaching and grasping on one side of the body. In older children, therapists may use a hand mitt and restraint for the stronger arm, to encourage use of the weaker side, called constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT). Even with the high intensity therapy of CIMT, it typically takes between 40-120 hours total treatment time for most children to improve their motor skills. A non-invasive form of nerve stimulation, transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (taVNS), stimulates a nerve by the ear that enhances learning motor skills. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of taVNS to improve motor skills when paired with CIMT in infants with one-sided weakness at 6-18months of age.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Patricia Coker-Bolt
843-792-7491
coerkpc@musc.edu

A Clinical Investigation of the Adjustable Continence Therapy (ACT®) for Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Due to Intrinsic Sphincter Deficiency

Date Added
May 25th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00103696
Researcher
Eric Rovner

List of Studies


Keywords
Bladder, Women's Health
Summary

This study is for females 22 years or older who have been diagnosed with stress urinary incontinence with primary intrinsic sphincter deficiency. Subjects are being invited to take part in a research study using a device called the ACT (Adjustable Continence Therapy for Women). ACT is an adjustable implantable silicone device for the treatment of unwanted loss of urine during activity (stress incontinence). The purpose of this study will be to find out if the implant of the ACT is safe and effective in reducing unwanted urine loss. The study will involve about 167 women that have unwanted urine loss. Participation is voluntary. This system is investigational which means it is not approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA). After placement of the devices, subjects will be followed for 12 months on a regular visit schedule. Annual visits may continue for up to 5 years (subjects will only come to clinic one time a year after the first year in the study).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jessica Jenkins
843-876-0630
jenkijn@musc.edu



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