Outcomes Related to COVID-19 Treated with Hydroxychloroquine among In-patients with Symptomatic Disease

Date Added
April 8th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00099215
Researcher
Andrew Goodwin

List of Studies

Keywords
Infectious Diseases, Lung, Pulmonary
Summary

This is a blinded, multicenter, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial. In this trial, the safety and effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of adults hospitalized with COVID-19 will be evaluated. In this study, a medication called hydroxychloroquine is being investigated to see if it improves recovery from COVID-19 in patients admitted to the hospital. Hydroxychloroquine is used to treat malaria and some joint (rheumatologic) diseases, but it is unknown if it helps patients recover from COVID-19. Study medication will be given for 5 days. This medication could be either hydroxychloroquine or placebo. There will be up to 510 patients in the study at about 50 hospitals in the United States.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Abigail Grady
843-792-2072
gradyabi@musc.edu

Crystalloids Liberal Or Vasopressors Early Resuscitation In Sepsis

Date Added
August 21st, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00078104
Researcher
Andrew Goodwin

List of Studies

Keywords
Lung, Pulmonary
Summary

This is a research study of different ways to use intravenous fluids (fluids given through a small tube placed in the vein) and vasopressors (medicines used to raise blood pressure) to treat sepsis, which is a serious infection. We are asking you to be in this study because: a) you have been diagnosed with low blood pressure due to an infection and b) your blood pressure has stayed low after your doctors gave you fluids. We do not know which approach is better in this situation: a)starting medicines to raise blood pressure first and then giving more fluids (if needed), or b) giving a larger amount of fluids first and then giving medicines to raise blood pressure if needed. Right now, the choice of approach is left to the doctors. Some doctors use medicines to raise blood pressure followed by extra fluids, and others use extra fluids followed by medicines to raise blood pressure. Some doctors use a combination of the two. This treatment part of the study will last for 24 hours, and then we will follow you until you go back to where you live. We want to find out whether one of these approaches compared to the other can improve a patient's chances of survival.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Abbi Reed
843-792-1820
reedab@musc.edu



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