TrialNet Protocol TN-01: Natural History of the Development of Type 1 Diabetes Save

Date Added
February 22nd, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00058766
Researcher
Lisa Knight
Keywords
Autoimmune disease, Diabetes, Immune System
Summary

The goal of the TrialNet Natural History Study of the Development of Type 1 Diabetes is to enhance the understanding of the demographic, immunologic, and metabolic characteristics of individuals at risk for developing type 1 diabetes. The Natural History Study will screen relatives of people with type 1 diabetes to identify those at risk for developing the disease. Male and female patients 1 year to 45 years of age who are first and second/third degree relatives of individuals with type 1 diabetes may be eligible to participate in this study.

Study Site:
Palmetto Health/USC Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology
9 Richland Medical Park
Columbia, SC 29203

Study Site Principal Investigator Contact Information:
Lisa Knight, MD at 803-434-7990

Institution
Palmetto
Recruitment Contact
Barbara (Barb) Thompson
803-434-4986
Barbara.Thompson@uscmed.sc.edu

The Influence of Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors within Normal Colonic Mucosa and Colon Polyps: A Feasibility Study Save

Date Added
January 17th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00060146
Researcher
Kristin Wallace
Keywords
Cancer, Cancer/Gastrointestinal, Colonoscopy, Disease Prevention, Immune System, Inflammation, Minorities
Summary

The purpose of the study is to determine the feasibility of enrolling patients, obtaining colorectal cancer risk factor data via an in-person questionnaire, and procuring three types of biologic samples (normal mucosa biopsies, a salvia sample, and polyp tissue (if applicable)).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Bridgette Blankenship
8438762445
blanke@musc.edu

Effects of Substance Use on Immune Cell Function Save

Date Added
January 3rd, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00062384
Researcher
Aimee Mc Rae
Keywords
Immune System, Substance Use
Summary

This brief, one-visit pilot study will evaluate the effect of marijuana and cocaine use on immune cell functioning via saliva and blood sampling.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Amanda Wagner
843-792-0484
wagne@musc.edu

Pathogen Identification in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients with Suspected Lower Respiratory Tract Infection Save

Date Added
December 6th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00060294
Researcher
Michelle Hudspeth
Keywords
Adolescents, Children's Health, Immune System, Lung, Pediatrics, Transplant
Summary

This study is for patient that have been diagnosed with suspected lower respiratory tract infection. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new test that may be able to find more lung infections than current tests can. This new test is called next-generation sequencing and looks in respiratory secretions for bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other organisms that may cause infection. We hope to learn more about the usefulness of this new test in identifying infections.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Thomas Hortman
864-792-9579
hortman@musc.edu

A DOUBLE BLIND, RANDOMIZED, STRATIFIED, MULTI-CENTER TRIAL EVALUATING CONVENTIONAL AND DOUBLE DOSE OSELTAMIVIR IN THE TREATMENT OF IMMUNOCOMPROMISED PATIENTS WITH INFLUENZA Save

Date Added
October 27th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00047307
Researcher
Andrew Atz
Keywords
Disease Prevention, Drug Studies, Immune System, Infectious Diseases, Pediatrics
Summary

The purpose of this study is to test the safety and efficacy of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) for the treatment of influenza in immunocompromised patients.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Kalyan Chundru
843-792-1213
choudhar@musc.edu

Elucidating Mechanisms of Treatment Relapse for Interferon-Free HCV Therapy Save

Date Added
August 18th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00046669
Researcher
Eric Meissner
Keywords
Digestive System, HIV / AIDS, Immune System, Infectious Diseases, Liver
Summary

Treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is now possible with all oral medications. While most patients achieve a sustained virologic response (SVR) after treatment, synonymous with cure, some patients relapse after treatment for reasons that are unclear. The goal of this research is to understand how a person's immune system changes during treatment of HCV infection with all oral therapy, and how these changes might impact the chances of relapse after treatment. To address these questions, blood and clinical information will be collected from study participants over the course of receiving standard of care treatment for HCV infection. This blood and clinical information will be used to conduct laboratory research focused on the immune system.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Stephanie Warth
843-792-5491
warth@musc.edu

A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-Controlled, Phase II Multicenter Trial of a Monoclonal Antibody to CD20 (Rituximab) for the Treatment of Systemic Sclerosis-Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (SSc-PAH) Save

Date Added
February 17th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00038310
Researcher
Rahul Argula
Keywords
Autoimmune disease, Drug Studies, Immune System, Lung, Pulmonary, Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH), Sarcoidosis, Scleroderma
Summary

Systemic sclerosis (SSc) or scleroderma is an autoimmune disease in which a person?s own immune cells attack his/her skin and internal organs, including the joints, lungs, heart, intestinal tract, and kidneys. The effects on the lungs, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), are among the most serious complications of SSc. In general, PAH is defined as an increase in pressure in the pulmonary arteries (the main blood vessels that lead from the heart to the lungs). Treatments for PAH have focused on symptom management rather than curing the disease.

This study has been designed to look at a new approach to treating the cause of the disease, rather than the symptoms of the disease. Recent research suggests that SSc-PAH may be the result of an ?attack? by immune cells. This study will look at the effect of the drug rituximab on the immune system and the immune ?attack? on the lungs. Rituximab is an immunosuppressive drug that eliminates the B cells for a few months, and therefore may halt the B cell attack on the lungs thought to be associated with this disease.The recovery of your B cells will be closely monitored throughout the study by blood testing.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Ashley Warden
843-792-4349
jonesash@musc.edu

Immunoglobulin Genes and Immunoevasion by Neurotropic Viruses in Schizophrenia Save

Date Added
January 22nd, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00039795
Researcher
Janardan Pandey
Keywords
Genetics, Immune System, Mental Health
Summary

Schizophrenia is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, accompanied by impairment in a variety of day-to-day cognitive functions that are associated with exposure to certain herpesviruses. This project investigates the role of a major gene of the immune system in the etilogy of herpesvirus-spurred cognitive impairment. Results from these investigations could help devise novel immunotherapeutic interventions in this devastating disorder.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Janardan Pandey
(843) 792-4360
pandeyj@musc.edu

The role of Innate Immunity in the Development of Phenotypic Keloid Disease Save

Date Added
June 29th, 2013
PRO Number
Pro00019607
Researcher
Titus Reaves
Keywords
Immune System, Skin, Vitamin D
Summary

Keloid disease predominantly affects African Americans, Hispanics and some Asians. Keloid disease is characterized by an overgrowth of an area of the skin following some injury to that same skin area. It is unknown why this occurs. However, we believe that differences in Vitamin D along with dysfunction in certain immune system receptors can lead to keloid disease. To further understand this process we intend to study the cells (fibroblasts) in the skin that are affected by Vitamin D and examine the specific immune proteins.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jacqueline Savage
(843) 792-9372; (843) 792-1870
savageja@musc.edu, reaves@musc.edu

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Gullah Health (SLEIGH) Save

Date Added
October 5th, 2009
IRB Number
10852
Researcher
Diane Kamen
Keywords
Autoimmune disease, Children's Health, Environmental Factors, Ethnicity and Disease, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Immune System, Joint, Kidney, Lupus, Minorities, Non-interventional, Vitamin D, Women's Health
Summary

The Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) in Gullah Health, or SLEIGH, study is an observational study enrolling African Americans from the Sea Island communities of South Carolina and Georgia. We are enrolling patients, family members of patients, and unrelated community members. SLE is a potentially severe disease that can affect the entire body. SLE is more common in African Americans than Caucasians. The main purpose of this study is to find genes that, along with factors from the environment, result in the development of SLE. Volunteers in SLEIGH will be asked to answer questions about their health and have blood and urine collected for tests. After the first visit there may be one additional visit 2 or more years later. This is not a drug study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Stephanie Slan
843-792-8997
slans@musc.edu

Change_preferences

-- OR --

Create_login