Racial/ethnic disparities in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) among women: examination of clinical factors and genetics

Date Added
August 11th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00098592
Researcher
Mara Lennard Richard

List of Studies


Keywords
Autoimmune disease, Ethnicity and Disease, Genetics, Kidney, Lupus, Women's Health
Summary

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) also known as lupus is a complex autoimmune disorder where the immune system attacks itself instead of external pathogens that can cause disease like bacteria or viruses. The large majority of SLE patients are women. The purpose of this study is to better understand how SLE affects overall patient health in women and expression of genes linked to the development of SLE. Part of this study involves collection of a blood sample at a single visit to test expression of genes linked to SLE. This study will compare demographic and clinical characteristics and genetic differences among women with SLE from three racial/ethnic groups. Better understanding of racial/ethnic differences in health and genetic expression of SLE could help reduce poor disease outcomes such as kidney or heart disease. Results will help us learn more about differences in SLE health across different racial/ethnic backgrounds and will guide medical care.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jonathan Flume
843-792-3926
jof63@musc.edu



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