Improving the Collaborative Health of Minority COVID-19 Survivor and Carepartner Dyads Through Interventions Targeting Social and Structural Health Inequities.

Date Added
May 6th, 2021
PRO Number
Pro00110062
Researcher
Gayenell Magwood

List of Studies


Keywords
Cardiovascular, Coronavirus, Diabetes, Hypertension/ High Blood Pressure, Minorities, Stroke
Summary

Underserved, racial and ethnic minority communities are experiencing higher rates of COVID-19 cases and associated mortality compared to whites due to long standing social and structural inequities that also drive disparities in chronic diseases such as stroke, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hypertension. Patients with underlying chronic diseases who are recovering from COVID-19 depend on the support of family and friends (informal caregivers/care partners) who are being exposed to the same pandemic and racial stressors, exposure that can affect the health and quality of life of both partners. The primary goal of this study is to test the efficacy of an adapted, telehealth-enhanced intervention that targets barriers impacting family illness management behaviors of Black/African American (AA) adult COVID-19 survivors and carepartner dyads for improved quality of life and COVID/chronic illness health related outcomes.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Gayenell Magwood
8437920685
magwoodg@musc.edu



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