A trial of transplanting Hepatitis C-viremic kidneys into Hepatitis C-Negative kidney recipients (THINKER-NEXT)

Date Added
July 3rd, 2022
PRO Number
Pro00119881
Researcher
Derek DuBay

List of Studies


Keywords
Infectious Diseases, Kidney, Transplant
Summary

This research study is being done to determine whether it is safe to give a kidney transplant from a donor with hepatitis C to a patient without hepatitis C. This study is looking for participants in need of a kidney transplant who are willing to accept a kidney from a patient with hepatitis C.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Morgan Overstreet
843-792-8896
overstrm@musc.edu

Reducing Disparities in Living Donation Among African Americans

Date Added
January 2nd, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00092908
Researcher
Derek DuBay

List of Studies


Keywords
Diabetes, Hypertension/ High Blood Pressure, Kidney, Transplant
Summary

Kidney donation from a living donor provides the kidney recipient with the best chance of a longterm survival of the transplanted kidney. White End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients are 4 times more likely to recieve a living donor kidney than are African American (AA) ESRD patients. There are many reasons for this disparity in obtaining the benefits of living donation for AAs, including lack of knowledge regarding the living donation process. This study will provide a web-based educational intervention to overcome this knowledge deficiency with the hope that there will be an increase in patient interest in living donation which will result in more living donation kidney transplant inquiries by patients' family or friends.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Thomas Morinelli
843-792-5405
morinelt@musc.edu

APOL1 Long-term kidney transplantation outcomes network (APOLLO)

Date Added
February 19th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00084947
Researcher
Derek DuBay

List of Studies


Keywords
Kidney, Transplant
Summary

Expression of APOL1 gene variants have been associated with higher likelihood of end stage renal disease in African Americans. In addition, kidney transplant recipients who have received a donated kidney from an African American expressing APOL1 variants have poorer outcomes with earlier transplanted kidney failure. This study will examine the occurance of the APOL1 gene variants in all African American donated kidneys, deceased and living, and African American recipients and recipients of African American donated kidneys, and to correlate the expression of these variants with outcome of the transplanted kidney and the kidney function of African American living donors. Samples of patients blood and urine will be acquired to measure the expression of the APOLO1 gene variants and associated kidney function, respectively.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Thomas Morinelli
8437925405
morinelt@musc.edu



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