A Phase 2, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel-Group, Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of EMB-001 in Subjects with Moderate-to-Severe Cocaine Use Disorder

Date Added
June 25th, 2020
PRO Number
Pro00101206
Researcher
Aimee McRae-Clark

List of Studies


Keywords
Substance Use
Summary

This study is looking at an investigational medication called EMB-001, which is a combination of metyrapone and oxazepam, to see if it may be an effective treatment for cocaine use disorder. Participants will undergo screening procedures to determine eligibility, and eligible participants will take either EMB-001 or placebo twice a day for 13 weeks. During this time, participants will come to the office two times a week to meet with study personnel, and they will attend a one-month follow-up visit.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lisa Nunn
843-792-0476
jenkini@musc.edu

Varenicline as a Treatment for DSM 5 Cannabis Use Disorder in Adults

Date Added
July 2nd, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00089933
Researcher
Aimee McRae-Clark

List of Studies


Keywords
Drug Studies, Substance Use
Summary

Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug. There is high demand for effective interventions for cannabis use disorder, yet few specific treatments for have been developed. This study will evaluate the efficacy of varenicline for reducing marijuana use in people who use marijuana frequently.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Amanda Wagner
843-792-0484
wagne@musc.edu

An Exploratory Investigation Utilizing Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) as a Tool to Decrease Pain and Improve Functioning in Veterans with Opioid Use Disorder

Date Added
February 5th, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00084970
Researcher
Aimee McRae-Clark

List of Studies


Keywords
Drug Studies, Substance Use
Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine if repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) reduces opiate craving and pain in Veterans who are receiving treatment for opioid use disorder. The study will last approximately three months. There will be a screening visit to determine eligibility, followed by the treatment phase during which participants will receive six sessions of rTMS a day for three non-consecutive days. This period may take up to three weeks. There are follow up visits at one week, four weeks and three months after the treatment phase has ended.
During rTMS, focused magnetic waves are directed at a part of the brain that is important in pain, and craving, to increase its activity. If you participate, you will receive six sessions of either active rTMS, or placebo rTMS, each day for three days (18 total sessions). Each session lasts 15 minutes. People typically do not have side effects with rTMS, though they initially may find it mildly painful at the application site. About 1 out of every 20 people who get rTMS have mild headaches after sessions that are typically relieved with over-the-counter medicines. A few people who have had rTMS have had seizures, though the chance of this happening is very small.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lisa Nunn
843-792-0476
jenkinli@musc.edu

Impact of progesterone on stress reactivity and cannabis use

Date Added
September 4th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00081360
Researcher
Aimee McRae-Clark

List of Studies


Keywords
Drug Studies, Psychiatry
Summary

The purpose of the study is to determine if the hormone progesterone affects marijuana users' stress response and marijuana use. Participation lasts approximately three weeks. During the first week, participants are randomly assigned to take either progesterone or placebo and remain abstinent from marijuana. They return at the end of the week to participate in a stress task. Throughout the three weeks, participants complete "CREMA" sessions (Cue Reactivity Ecologic Momentary Assessment) three times a day. These sessions include looking at stressful and neutral pictures and rating stress and craving.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lisa Nunn
843-792-0476
jenkinli@musc.edu

A Phase 2B, 8-Week, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel Group Study to Evaluate the Efficacy, Safety and Tolerability of the Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibitor PF-04457845 in Adults with DSM-5 Current Cannabis Use Disorder (CUD)

Date Added
July 3rd, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00079439
Researcher
Aimee McRae-Clark

List of Studies


Keywords
Drug Studies, Substance Use
Summary

This study will examine whether the investigational medication PF-0447845 is safe and effective in reducing cannabis use among people who frequently use cannabis. This is a 14-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled outpatient clinical trial that will be conducted at 4 research sites in the eastern U.S.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Amanda Wagner
843-792-0484
wagne@musc.edu

A Preliminary Investigation of Pre-Frontal repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) for the Treatment of Cannabis Use Disorder.

Date Added
January 3rd, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00062407
Researcher
Aimee McRae-Clark

List of Studies


Keywords
Brain, Depression, Mental Health, Psychiatry, Smoking, Substance Use
Summary

Recent research suggests that a new kind of treatment, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can help people with substance use disorders cut down or quit using. This study seeks to recruit individuals who are currently heavy marijuana users who are attempting to cut down or quit using marijuana. Participants will have 20 treatments of active or sham rTMS over 10 visits. In addition to having a 50% chance of receiving rTMS, participants will be given behavioral counseling. Participants who received sham rTMS will have the opportunity to receive active rTMS after they complete the study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lauren Campbell
843-792-5215
campblau@musc.edu

Neural substrates of emotion: Impact of cocaine dependence

Date Added
December 2nd, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00039699
Researcher
Aimee McRae-Clark

List of Studies


Keywords
Drug Studies, Psychiatry, Stress Disorders, Substance Use
Summary

Social stress often leads to drug craving and relapse in cocaine-dependent populations. Currently there are no FDA approved medications for the treatment of cocaine dependence. Therefore, biomedical research studies aimed at investigating the brain mechanisms responsible for controlling emotional responses to social stress could have a significant impact on the development of effective therapeutic treatment strategies for cocaine-dependent individuals.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lisa Nunn
792-0476
jenkinli@musc.edu



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