Enhancing self-regulation by altering memories that increase risk of relapse among smokers: A translational clinical neuroscience study of a novel medication Save

Date Added
June 5th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00076669
Researcher
Michael Saladin

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Drug Studies, Smoking
Summary

The proposed study is looking to recruit smokers over the age of 18 to complete a four visit study. Participants will be randomized to receive either rapamycin (sirolimus) or a placebo at the second visit to assess potential effects on craving and relapse. Four study visits will be completed over the course of about three weeks.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brittany Frasier
843-792-6984
frasibri@musc.edu

Development and Testing of a Smoking Cessation E-Visit for Implementation in Primary Care Save

Date Added
June 5th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00078077
Researcher
Jennifer Dahne

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Smoking
Summary

The goal of this study is to develop, refine, and complete preliminary feasibility testing of a smoking cessation electronic visit (e-visit) for implementation in primary care/family medicine. We will conduct a feasibility RCT (n=90) of the smoking cessation e-visit as compared to treatment as usual (TAU), delivered via primary care, with primary objective to provide effect size estimates for a larger RCT. Primary outcomes cluster around: 1) treatment feasibility, 2) treatment acceptability, 3) treatment satisfaction, 4) evidence-based cessation treatment utilization, and 5) cessation-related outcomes (quit attempt incidence, abstinence). We hypothesize that participants randomized to the e-visit condition as compared to those randomized to the TAU condition will have higher rates of cessation treatment utilization (medications, counseling) and superior cessation-related outcomes.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lisa Coles
843-876-2291
colesl@musc.edu

Examining the effects of Theta Burst Stimulation on corticothalamic mediated inhibitory control and smoking relapse vulnerability Save

Date Added
February 20th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00074836
Researcher
Brett Froeliger

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Brain, Smoking
Summary

MUSC is recruiting adult cigarette smokers (18 to 65) who are interested in participating in a research study examining the effects of brain stimulation on neural activity and behavior. This study consists of 4 visits over the course of 2-3 weeks. Qualified individuals will be compensated for participation.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Makayla Joy Gibson
(803) 814-4017
mjgibson@email.sc.edu

QuitFast: Evaluating transcranial magnetic stimulation as a tool to reduce smoking directly following a quit attempt Save

Date Added
February 6th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00074769
Researcher
Colleen Hanlon

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Brain, Psychiatry, Smoking, Substance Use
Summary

The first week after attempting to quite cigarette smoking is the hardest period to succeed. Research shows that individuals able to remain cigarette free for this first week are significantly more likely to quit the smoking habit. In this study, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, we are evaluating a new tool to assist individuals with quitting cigarette smoking. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive technique that uses magnetic pulses to temporarily stimulate specific brain areas (without the need for surgery, anesthetic, or other invasive procedures). This study will test whether 10 daily sessions of TMS over the forehead can help decrease smoking rates in treatment-seeking individuals.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Julia Imperatore
843-792-5560
imperato@musc.edu

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for smoking cessation in cancer patients Save

Date Added
September 5th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00066330
Researcher
Xingbao Li

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Brain, Cancer, Smoking
Summary

Cigarette smoking is a significant public health concern especially in cancer patients. rTMS has been investigated for smoking cessation in healthy smokers. This study will test the therapeutic benefits of rTMS for smoking cessation in cancer patients with smoking. Firstly, we will evaluate total number of smoke-free days during a 7-day quit attempt. Secondly, we will evaluate cigarette consumption and cue craving for smoking during the quit attempt period.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Xingbao Li
843-792-5729
lixi@musc.edu

Targeting Foundational Memory Processes in Nicotine Addiction: A Translational Clinical Neuroscience Study of a Retrieval-Extinction Save

Date Added
September 5th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00069355
Researcher
Michael Saladin

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Smoking
Summary

We recently published results from a NIDA-funded study of a brief behavioral treatment that was designed to reduce the troublesome cravings that smokers encounter when they attempt to quit smoking. This intervention was based on a growing body of neuroscience studies showing that memories for prior learning can be retrieved by the presentation of cues involved in that learning. Once retrieved, the memories enter into a brief period of vulnerability, during which they can be modified, but after which they are reconsolidated (restabilized) back into long-term storage. The treatment potential of this phenomenon was initially demonstrated in a Science report in which inpatient heroin addicts were briefly exposed to cues associated with heroin use in order to prompt the heroin use memories into a vulnerable state. Once the memories were in this state, the heroin addicts received extinction training consisting of protracted exposure to heroin associated cues. It was argued that extinction would change the memories such that the cues would no longer be associated with heroin administration and reward. Remarkably, after just two sessions of retrieval-extinction training (RET), the investigators found that craving in response to heroin cues was substantially reduced for up to 6-months post-treatment. This effect was observed relative to a control group that received retrieval involving non-heroin cues, followed by extinction. These impressive initial findings led us to replicate and extend the study in cigarette smokers. In our study, one group of smokers received two sessions of RET with smoking cues whereas a control group received the same training except that retrieval consisted of brief exposure to neutral, smoking-unrelated cues. Craving and other reactions to familiar and novel smoking cues were assessed in test sessions performed 24-hrs, 2-weeks and 1-month after intervention; smoking behavior was also assessed over 1-month follow-up. Remarkably, at 1-month follow-up, craving to both familiar and novel smoking cues was significantly lower in the group receiving R-E training vs. control. Even more striking was the 25% reduction in the number of cigarettes smoked per day in the RET group vs. control. [Also of significance was suggestive evidence that, relative to control participants, more participants in the RET group achieved a 60% reduction in smoking (from pretreatment levels)]. The proposed project will replicate and extend these findings by 1) increasing the dose of intervention so as to bolster the observed treatment effects, 2) employing brain imaging methods to identify patterns of brain activity uniquely associated with the intervention and potentially predictive of treatment outcome, 3) adding a control group that will enhance understanding of the effects of RET, and 4) extending follow-up period to more completely document the long-term effects of RET. Positive findings from this study could lead to the development of a brief, effective behavioral intervention to reduce the burden levied against society by smoking. Importantly, this intervention could be easily adapted to treat other forms of addiction and co-occurring anxiety disorders, such as PTSD.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Brittany Frasier
843-792-6984
frasibri@musc.edu

HIV-associated Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Emphysema Save

Date Added
August 15th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00066169
Researcher
Lynn Schnapp

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
HIV / AIDS, Pulmonary, Smoking
Summary

Emphysema is a type of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and a major cause of death. Studies suggest that emphysema is more common in HIV positive people (HIV+) compared to HIV negative (HIV-) people. The purpose of this research study is to determine whether emphysema in HIV+ patients is clinically and biologically different compared to emphysema in those without HIV.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Mary Blanton
8437928438
blantonm@musc.edu

Tobacco treatment in the context of lung cancer screening: NRT and text messaging Save

Date Added
August 15th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00068951
Researcher
Alana Rojewski

List of Studies

Silhouette
Keywords
Cancer/Lung, Lung, Pulmonary, Smoking
Summary

Screening for lung cancer at earlier, more treatable stages has the potential to reduce mortality from the U.S.'s most deadly cancer. Annual lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography is now recommended for high risk individuals based on age and smoking history. This study will evaluate a smoking cessation intervention for lung cancer screening patients. We will evaluate quit rates after a standard intervention (brief counseling session at time of LCS) versus a medication and text messaging intervention.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Alana Rojewski
843-876-1593
rojewski@musc.edu

CONNECT (Clinical Outcomes of a Nationwide, Naturalistic E-Cig Trial) Save

Date Added
June 6th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00066540
Researcher
Matthew Carpenter

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Smoking
Summary

The purpose of this study is to measure changes in smoking behavior during and following sampling of an e-cigarette product. E-cigarettes are classified by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a tobacco product, though they contain no tobacco. Unlike regular cigarettes, which are burned (creating smoke that is inhaled), e-cigarettes include a heating element that vaporizes nicotine. E-cigarettes are likely much safer than conventional cigarettes, but they may not be entirely safe. We are testing the effects of one specific e-cigarette (NJoy) on smoking behavior. Neither the tobacco industry nor any e-cigarette manufacturer provides support of any kind to this study. There is no requirement to quit smoking in this study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Amy Boatright
843-876-2440
boatrigh@musc.edu

K23-Personalized Smoking Relapse Prevention Delivered in Real-Time via Just-in-Time-Adaptive Interventions Save

Date Added
December 6th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00061239
Researcher
Bryan Heckman

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Smoking
Summary

Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of preventable death worldwide, and the need for new and improved treatment approaches is further highlighted by the fact that only 5% of smokers who make a quit attempt can maintain abstinence for at least one year. In an effort to reduce relapse risk the proposed study will develop a personalized intervention that will deliver evidence-based treatment in real-time through mobile phones to meet the dynamic needs of patients engaged in a quit attempt. Given the high rates of mobile phone ownership, this intervention has great promise for increasing access to smoking cessation/relapse prevention services, thereby benefiting public health.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Asia Abad
843-792-9910
blissas@musc.edu

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