Communicating & disseminating research findings to study participants Save

Date Added
June 16th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00067659
Researcher
Teresa Kelechi

Silhouette
Keywords
Adolescents, Cancer, Diabetes, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Infectious Diseases, Lung, Men's Health, Mental Health, Obesity, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke, Women's Health
Summary

Many individuals who volunteer to participate in research studies are never informed about the results of those studies, and what the researchers learned from having conducted them. We believe that if researchers share results of studies with those who participated in them as volunteers, these past participants may be more likely to feel positively that they have contributed to improving the health in their communities, be more likely to enroll in other studies in the future, share their experience with others, encourage others to participate in research, and experience other positive outcomes. We want to know people's feelings about the importance of receiving study findings and how they would prefer to receive such information (what channels/formats, what kinds of messages, etc). In this study, we are looking to get the feedback of adolescents (ages 15 through 24) and older adults (50 and over) who completed their participated in an MUSC study between January 1, 2010 and present. We are also looking for MUSC researchers whose research studies have included adolescents and older adults between January 1, 2010 and the present, to get their feedback on their current strategies of sharing findings and what they believe might be best practices for doing so. Participation in our study will involve surveys and focus groups interviews.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Dana Burshell
843-792-1497
burshell@musc.edu

Monitoring and Managing Newly Healed Chronic Leg and Foot Ulcer Skin Temperature: A Cooling Intervention (MUSTCOOL) to Prevent Ulcer Recurrence Save

Date Added
June 2nd, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00043450
Researcher
Teresa Kelechi

Silhouette
Keywords
Aging, Circulation, Diabetes, Inflammation, Skin, Vascular
Summary

Individuals with venous leg and diabetic foot ulcers often find these ulcers take a long time to heal and when they do, sometimes they come back. These ulcers can be quite painful making it hard to work, sleep and go about one's day to day activities. You will be asked to do a self-care routine of taking the temperature of the skin where the leg or foot ulcer just healed with a special thermometer and applying a small cooling gel patch over this skin. We want to know if this routine will prevent the ulcer from coming back, help you to become more active, and improve the quality of your life.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Margaret Prentice
843 792 4771
prenticm@musc.edu

FOOTFIT Mhealth Physical Activity Intervention for Leg Ulcer Patients Save

Date Added
May 5th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00043451
Researcher
Teresa Kelechi

Silhouette
Keywords
Aging, Circulation, Exercise, Skin, Vascular
Summary

This study will test a low intensity foot exercise program for people with lower leg ulcers and who have problems with walking to see if it improves the condition of the legs. A small activity monitoring tracker called an accelerometer will be placed on the foot during the exercises that are to be done in the home for about 6 weeks. The tracker sends movement information to a cell phone that lets you and your doctor know about improvements in the foot movements. Better foot movements help condition the muscles and joints and may improve activity such as walking and getting up from a chair.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Darla Howard
864-560-1042
dhoward@srhs.com

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