Do changes in esophageal intrabolus pressure predict clinical and endoscopic response to therapy in eosinophilic esophagitis? Save

Date Added
January 28th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00051187
Researcher
Steven Clayton
Keywords
Esophagus
Summary

Eosinophilic esophagitis is understood to be a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the presence of esophageal eosinophilia in the clinic context of dysphagia. This disease has been further categorized into predominantly fibrostenotic and inflammatory phenotypes. It is believed that these two subtypes may represent a continuum of change and disease progression of the esophagus; with fibrostenotic changes developing over time. We have demonstrated in another study that intrabolus pressure as obtained via high resolution esophageal manometry can reliably differentiate these two subtypes. It is our hypothesis that intrabolus pressure may not only serve as a novel tool to differentiate these subtypes, but may serve as a novel objective marker to assess overall clinical severity of this disease. After thorough review of the current literature, there have yet been no studies demonstrating a reliable diagnostic modality to accomplish this objective. A novel prognostic marker would help further our understanding of eosinophilic esophagitis and help guide more focused management.

Institution
Greenville
Recruitment Contact
Steven Clayton
8644552044
sclayton@ghs.org

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