S.C.O.P.E. Systematic Collection and Objective Progressive Exercise Save

Date Added
November 16th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00057398
Researcher
Mark Bowden
Keywords
Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

We have designed a comprehensive, evidence-based approach to physical therapy rehabilitation after stroke that focuses on the intensity of cardiovascular, strength, and gait training, standardizing the dosage and progression of each type of training. Implementation of this standardization of intensity protocol will be guided via an internet-based (REDCap) interactive program available to each treating therapist. This program will cue the therapist to complete two sessions of cardiovascular, strength, and gait training each week at the appropriate intensity while not being prescriptive about specific activities to meet the stated goals. Eighty individuals with stroke (20 each from Charleston, SC; Anderson, SC; Rock Hill, SC; and York, PA ) who meet inclusion and exclusion criteria and will undergo a standardized evaluation at admission and discharge assessing gait speed, endurance, strength, balance, and overall functional independence and will be compared to 80 individuals with stroke receiving usual care. In addition, each enrollee will participate in a telephone screen at 90 days post-stroke to assess participation, quality of life, falls efficacy, falls history, and stroke-related secondary health conditions/readmissions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Eric Monsch
(843) 792-0275
monsch@musc.edu

VA Stroke Rehabilitation Research Database Save

Date Added
May 20th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00043107
Researcher
Mark Bowden
Keywords
Military, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

The aim of this study is to gather information about veterans at the Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Medical Center (RHJ-VAMC) who've experienced a stroke and are interested in participating in rehabilitation research.

VA principal investigators at the Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurologic Conditions (CRRNC) conduct stroke rehabilitation research for individuals. CRRNC include laboratories that investigate and assess upper extremity motor function, neuro-stimulation, communication and swallowing, locomotor energetics, locomotor and rehabilitation, and motor performance functions.

Participants will be asked to come to the CRRNC located at the Medical University of South Carolina (77 President Street, Charleston, South Carolina) and fill out a simple screening form with study personnel. Participants may be contacted in the future for qualifying studies.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Christina Thompson
843-792-6313
thompchr@musc.edu

Motor Cortical Control of Plantarflexors and Dorsiflexors after Stroke Save

Date Added
June 3rd, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00034009
Researcher
Mark Bowden
Keywords
Brain, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Nerve, Stroke
Summary

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is often used to assess the excitability of the brain and the connectivity between the brain and peripheral muscles. However, less work has been completed with the portion of the brain controlling leg muscles. In addition, there appears to be more error and less reliability in these measures in those with stroke. This project aims to assess a battery of TMS-derived outcome measures to determine the most effective for those after stroke. This information is of critical importance as we use this technology to assess changes after rehabilitation post stroke and to understand the motor control of walking after neurologic injury.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aaron Embry
843-792-8198
embry@musc.edu

Excitatory and Inhibitory rTMS as Mechanistic Contributors to Walking Recovery Save

Date Added
March 4th, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00032252
Researcher
Mark Bowden
Keywords
Nervous System, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

Individuals with chronic stroke (greater than 6 months post-stroke) will be evaluated to assess the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on walking function. Contributors to walking such as lesion size and location, brain activation, strength, force production during walking, and biomechanical variables will also be assessed. Each individual will be examined with excitatory, inhibitory and sham stimulation to assess the effects on the above variables. In addition, each type of stimulation will be combined with a walking rehabilitation program to determine the affect of adding rehabilitation. Each participant will be requested to undergo 8 sessions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aaron Embry
843-792-8198
embry@musc.edu

Assessment of Contributions to Impaired Walking after Neurologic Injury Save

Date Added
January 15th, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00028941
Researcher
Mark Bowden
Keywords
Brain, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Muscle, Nerve, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

Rehabilitation interventions including resistance training, functional and task-specific therapy, and gait or locomotor training have been shown to be successful in improving motor function in individuals with neurologic disease or injury. Recent investigations conducted in our laboratory indicate that intense resistance training coupled with task-specific functional training lead to significant gains in functional motor recovery. Similarly, gait rehabilitation involving intense treadmill training and/or task-specific locomotor training has been shown to be effective in improving locomotor ability. However, the underlying neural adaptations associated with these therapeutic approaches are not well understood. Our primary goal is to understand the motor control underpinnings of neurologic rehabilitation in order to apply this knowledge to future generations of therapeutic interventions.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aaron Embry
843-792-8198
embry@musc.edu

Augmentation of Locomotor Adaptation Post-Stroke Save

Date Added
March 6th, 2012
PRO Number
Pro00016060
Researcher
Mark Bowden
Keywords
Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation Studies, Stroke
Summary

This project will evaluate two different methods of normalizing the center of mass acceleration (COMa) in individuals post-stroke, specifically focusing on rates and pattern of recovery to analyze walking-specific adaptations as precursors to motor learning. In addition, the proposed project seeks to establish the optimal configuration of electrodes to activate neural circuits involved in post-stroke locomotion. Once the better method of training COMa and optimal parameters of electrode placement for tDCS are identified, we will evaluate the effects of tDCS on locomotor adaptations during single sessions and over a five-day training period.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Aaron Embry
843.792.8198
embry@musc.edu

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