Treatment of Drug-resistant Pediatric Primary Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis Using the Liposorber® LA-15 System Save

Date Added
January 10th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00059528
Researcher
Katherine Twombley

Silhouette
Keywords
Blood Disorders, Kidney, Pediatrics
Summary

A device called the "Liposorber LA-15 System" has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for treating kids with focal segmental
glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The "Liposorber LA-15 System" can only be used if other treatment options, like drugs, don't work or can't be used, but the kidneys are still working okay. It can also be used if the subject has had a kidney transplant and the FSGS comes back after the transplant. Although the Liposorber System can be used for FSGS, we are not sure how well the Liposorber System works. So, we are doing this study to find out how well the treatment works.

In this research study, there will be up to 5 children who have FSGS enrolled at MUSC. Subjects will come back for up to 12 treatments over 9 weeks and then 5 visits to their study doctor over the next 2 years.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Katherine Twombley
843-792-8904
twombley@musc.edu

A Randomized, Double-Blind, Efficacy and Safety Study of AR 14 (AZILSARTAN MEDOXOMIL) Treatment and Withdrawal, Followed by an Open-Label Extension, in Children 6 to Less Than 18 Years of Age With Hypertension Save

Date Added
January 13th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00039004
Researcher
Katherine Twombley

Silhouette
Keywords
Adolescents, Children's Health, Hypertension/ High Blood Pressure, Pediatrics
Summary

This research study is for children between 6 years and 18 years of age who have been diagnosed with hypertension, or high blood pressure. Hypertension or high blood pressure is when someone's blood vessels, called arteries, tighten too much. The study lasts 12 months and could involve up to 17 study visits. Compensation is available.

The main purpose of this study is to find out if the study drug, Azilsartan medoxomil (also called AZM, TAK-491, or AR14) is effective in controlling blood pressure in children 6 to less than 18 years of age and to find out if it is safe and well tolerated in this age group compared to placebo. The safety and effectiveness of AZM in children less than 18 years of age have not yet been established and currently are under investigation in the age group 1 to 17 years. This means it does not currently have FDA approval for use in children and adolescents.

Another purpose of the study is to compare a drug called losartan potassium (Cozaar) to AZM. Cozaar is an FDA approved drug that is used to treat high blood pressure in adults and children

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Anna Tecklenburg
843-792-9454
tecklenb@musc.edu

CureGN: Cure Glomerulonephropathy Network Save

Date Added
December 2nd, 2014
PRO Number
Pro00038759
Researcher
Katherine Twombley

Silhouette
Keywords
Adolescents, Children's Health, Disease Prevention, Kidney, Minorities, Pediatrics
Summary

Adult and Pediatric patients with glomerular disease:
Patients of all ages are needed to participate in a research study to investigate glomerular disease and create a worldwide database to help in the research and future treatment of this disease. To join this study, you must have a type of glomerular disease, have had a first kidney biopsy within the last 5 years, not be on dialysis, or not have had a kidney transplant.

The study is projected to last 4 years, and all study procedures will be done at regular clinic visits (between 1 and 3 yearly). Study procedures include filling out questionnaires and a blood draw at each visit.

Compensation is available for study participation.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Lauren Card
843-792-5935
cardl@musc.edu

A prospective, multisite study to evaluate the Impact of Measles, Mumps, Rubella and Varicella ProQuad(®) vaccination in pediatric patients 6-24 months of age who are being considered and/or evaluated for any solid organ transplant (heart, liver or kidney) Save

Date Added
October 1st, 2013
PRO Number
Pro00025854
Researcher
Katherine Twombley

Silhouette
Keywords
Kidney, Pediatrics, Transplant, Vaccine
Summary

Currently, vaccination against measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (MMRV) is recommended for healthy infants starting at 12 months of age. It is not recommended for immunosuppressed patients, such as transplant patients, who have an increased risk of serious complications from infections like varicella, mumps, measles and rubella.

For this research study, we plan to administer the first dose between 6 months and 24 months of age and the second dose at least 30 days but no more than 365 days after the first dose

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Ann Shrum
843-792-9454
frampton@musc.edu

Change_preferences

-- OR --

Create_login