A Randomized Clinical Trial of Overminus Spectacle Therapy For Intermittent Exotropia (IXT5) Save

Date Added
January 17th, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00062434
Researcher
Edward Cheeseman

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Keywords
Vision/ Eye
Summary

The purpose of this study is to find help for intermittent exotropia (eyes that drift) by using overminus glasses (glasses that are intentionally stronger).

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Carol Bradham
843-792-2338
bradhamc@musc.edu

Growth and Retinopathy of Prematurity Registry Save

Date Added
April 26th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00053408
Researcher
Edward Cheeseman

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Keywords
Vision/ Eye
Summary

The purpose of the registry is to provide a mechanism to store clinical data to support future research about postnatal weight gain based risk prediction for severe ROP and secondarily severe ROP and ROP treatment rates. If validated, the predictive model would eventually replace current ROP screening guidelines in determining the necessity and timing of ROP examinations for premature infants.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Kinsey Shirer
843-792-2799
evanssa@musc.edu

INTERMITTENT EXOTROPIA STUDY 1 (IXT1) A Randomized Trial of Bilateral Lateral Rectus Recession versus Unilateral Lateral Rectus Recession with Medial Rectus Resection for Intermittent Exotropia Save

Date Added
February 2nd, 2011
IRB Number
20190
Researcher
Edward Cheeseman

Silhouette
Keywords
Vision/ Eye
Summary

This research is being done with children who have a condition called intermittent exotropia. Intermittent exotropia is the medical term used when the eyes turn out some of the time and are straight at other times. Intermittent exotropia is one of the most common types of eye misalignment in children.

Intermittent exotropia is often treated with surgery on the eye muscles to make the eyes straight again. There are different ways to do this surgery to straighten the eyes. One way is to operate on two muscles on one eye. Another way is to operate on one muscle on each eye. Both ways of doing the surgery work well but we do not know if one way is better than the other. This is the reason why the study is being done.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Carol Bradham
843-792-2338
bradhamc@musc.edu

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