Theta Burst Stimulation as a tool to decrease drinking in treatment-seeking alcohol users Save

Date Added
October 1st, 2019
PRO Number
Pro00092058
Researcher
Colleen Hanlon

List of Studies


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Keywords
Alcohol, Brain, Drug Studies, Psychiatry, Substance Use
Summary

There is growing interest in the utilization of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a novel, non-pharmacologic approach to decreasing alcohol use among treatment-seeking individuals with Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD). The results of this study will be used to determine which of the 2 proposed TMS strategies has a larger effect on drinking behavior (% days abstinent, % heavy drinking days) as well as alcohol cue-reactivity in a 4 month period. These data will pave the way for TMS to be used as an innovative, new treatment option for individuals with AUD.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Julia Imperatore
843-792-5560
imperato@musc.edu

H-coil TMS to reduce pain: A pilot study evaluating relative efficacy of the H1 vs H7 coil Save

Date Added
July 3rd, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00079129
Researcher
Colleen Hanlon

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Keywords
Pain, Psychiatry
Summary

Chronic pain is a serious public health problem with estimates as high as nearly half of the adult population experiencing some form of pain that lasts for more than 6 months. This issue negatively impacts quality of life, is financially burdensome, and has contributed to the opioid crisis in the United States. Therefore, a non-pharmacologic, non-invasive approach for alleviating chronic pain like prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an appealing avenue for research into chronic pain management. While rTMS has already been approved for use in treating depression, it has shown promise in treating chronic pain as well. However, there is a debate about which coil designs are most effective and which regions of the brain respond best to rTMS therapy. This study will examine the use of two novel coil designs the H1 coil which is designed to increase activity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the H7 coil which is designed to decrease activity of the medial prefrontal cortex. To evaluate the efficacy of the two treatment strategies, patients will undergo thermal pain testing before and after the rTMS interventions. The relative efficacy of these two treatment strategies will be useful for establishing rTMS as an effective strategy for chronic pain management and determining the direction for future rTMS research.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
John McLeod
843-792-6402
mcleodjo@musc.edu

Developing brain stimulation as a treatment for chronic pain in opiate dependent individuals Save

Date Added
July 3rd, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00078668
Researcher
Colleen Hanlon

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Brain, Drug Studies, Pain, Psychiatry
Summary

The purpose of this study is to develop transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a novel, non-pharmacologic approach to decreasing pain in individuals with chronic pain. This study will test whether rTMS over the prefrontal cortex can produce a reduction in your perception of pain, your desire to use opiates, and your brain's response to opiate cues. The results of this study will be used to design and develop a large clinical trial of rTMS as an innovative, new treatment option for chronic lower back pain in individuals that may have used chronic opiates.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Julia Imperatore
843-792-5560
imperato@musc.edu

QuitFast: Evaluating transcranial magnetic stimulation as a tool to reduce smoking directly following a quit attempt Save

Date Added
February 6th, 2018
PRO Number
Pro00074769
Researcher
Colleen Hanlon

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Brain, Psychiatry, Smoking, Substance Use
Summary

The first week after attempting to quite cigarette smoking is the hardest period to succeed. Research shows that individuals able to remain cigarette free for this first week are significantly more likely to quit the smoking habit. In this study, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, we are evaluating a new tool to assist individuals with quitting cigarette smoking. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive technique that uses magnetic pulses to temporarily stimulate specific brain areas (without the need for surgery, anesthetic, or other invasive procedures). This study will test whether 10 daily sessions of TMS over the forehead can help decrease smoking rates in treatment-seeking individuals.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Julia Imperatore
843-792-5560
imperato@musc.edu

The Effects of Theta-Burst Stimulation Duration on Human Motor Cortex Excitability Save

Date Added
August 1st, 2017
PRO Number
Pro00068775
Researcher
Colleen Hanlon

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Psychiatry, Rehabilitation Studies
Summary

The study will use a new method for non-invasively examining the brain called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). TMS involves placing a coil of wire above the scalp and intermittently passing a very powerful current through it. This current produces energy in the form of a magnetic field that passes through the scalp. The magnetic field, in turn, induces a much weaker electrical current in the brain, causing the neurons directly under the coil to activate for a brief period of time. The U.S. Federal Drug Administration has approved TMS as a method for treating depression since 2008. By using TMS, we can evaluate how well your brain is controlling one of your hand or leg muscles. One way to measure this is by recording activity via electrodes on the hand opposite the side of the brain being stimulated. For example we will be stimulating on the left side of the brain and recording from electrodes on your right hand. In this study we are determining the effects of different types of repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) protocols on hand movement. rTMS means that the magnetic pulses are applied consecutively, and at a specified pace- the frequency. The specific type of rTMS you will receive is called "theta-burst stimulation" (TBS). TBS is characterized by a specific frequency of stimulation.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
John Henderson
792-5560
henderjs@musc.edu

Charleston ARC Clinical Project 4- Cortical rTMS as a tool to change craving and brain reactivity to alcohol cues Save

Date Added
December 1st, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00050256
Researcher
Colleen Hanlon

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Alcohol, Brain, Substance Use
Summary

This study examines the effects of non-invasive brain stimulation as a tool to change the brain's response to alcohol cues. There are 3 study visits. At each study visit participants will receive a single session of real or sham transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) followed by an MRI scan. This study does not involve alcohol treatment. Interested individuals must be referred for participation by the Charleston Alcohol Research Center Clinical Intake and Assessment Core. For more information, call 792-1222 or email alcoholstudy@musc.edu.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Charleston Alcohol Research Center
(843) 792-1222
alcoholstudy@musc.edu

10 days of medial prefrontal cortex theta burst stimulation (MPFC cTBS) as a tool to improve clinical outcomes and decrease frontal-striatal reactivity to cues among treatment-engaged cocaine users Save

Date Added
October 6th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00046438
Researcher
Colleen Hanlon

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Brain, Drug Studies, Psychiatry, Substance Use
Summary

The goal of this pilot study is to determine if, in treatment-seeking substance dependent individuals, ten sessions of continuous theta burst transcranial magnetic brain stimulation (cTBS) over a brain region involved in craving (medial prefrontal cortex) can lower an individual's craving and brain response to drug-related cues. This study involves a screening visit, followed by one MRI visit, followed by ten cTBS treatment visits on consecutive days. There will be three follow-up MRI visits: the first will immediately follow completion of a 28-day outpatient treatment program, while the second and third will be one month and two months post-treatment.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Julia Imperatore
843-792-5560
imperato@musc.edu

rTMS as a Tool to Decrease Pain and Opiate Craving Save

Date Added
April 7th, 2015
PRO Number
Pro00042186
Researcher
Colleen Hanlon

List of Studies


Profiles_link
Keywords
Brain, Drug Studies, Psychiatry, Substance Use
Summary

The purpose of this study is to develop repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) as a potential treatment for opiate dependence addiction. Repetitive TMS is a non-invasive technique that uses magnetic pulses to temporarily stimulate specific brain areas in awake people (without the need for surgery, anesthetic, or other invasive procedures). This study will test whether rTMS over the prefrontal cortex can produce a reduction in your perception of pain, your desire to use opiates, and your brain's response to opiate cues. TMS has been approved by the FDA as an investigational tool as well a therapy for depression.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Julia Imperatore
843-792-5560
imperato@musc.edu

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