Maternal vs. Direct Infant Vitamin D Supplementation during Lactation RCT: Priming the Infant Immune System: Pilot Study Save

Date Added
January 5th, 2016
PRO Number
Pro00050609
Researcher
Carol Wagner

Silhouette
Keywords
Lactation, Vitamin D
Summary

Breastfeeding is important for the development of the immune system of the infant. Emerging data suggest that vitamin D plays an important role in immunity as well. Exclusively breastfeeding mothers and their infants will be studied in a 3-month (4-study visit) pilot study of vitamin D supplementation versus placebo. Longitudinal effects of vitamin D status on breast milk composition and on the infant's immune system will be examined.
Additionally, exclusively breastfeeding mothers who are currently on vitamin D supplementation will be studied at a single visit, at which mothers will provide a single breastmilk sample and have a single blood sample obtained. These samples will be used to examine effects of vitamin D supplementation on breast milk composition.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Nina Forestieri
843-792-2112
forestie@musc.edu

The role of Innate Immunity in the Development of Phenotypic Keloid Disease Save

Date Added
June 29th, 2013
PRO Number
Pro00019607
Researcher
Titus Reaves

Silhouette
Keywords
Immune System, Skin, Vitamin D
Summary

Keloid disease predominantly affects African Americans, Hispanics and some Asians. Keloid disease is characterized by an overgrowth of an area of the skin following some injury to that same skin area. It is unknown why this occurs. However, we believe that differences in Vitamin D along with dysfunction in certain immune system receptors can lead to keloid disease. To further understand this process we intend to study the cells (fibroblasts) in the skin that are affected by Vitamin D and examine the specific immune proteins.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Jacqueline Savage
(843) 792-9372; (843) 792-1870
savageja@musc.edu, reaves@musc.edu

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Gullah Health (SLEIGH) Save

Date Added
October 5th, 2009
IRB Number
10852
Researcher
Diane Kamen

Silhouette
Keywords
Autoimmune disease, Children's Health, Environmental Factors, Ethnicity and Disease, Healthy Volunteer Studies, Immune System, Joint, Kidney, Lupus, Minorities, Non-interventional, Vitamin D, Women's Health
Summary

The Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) in Gullah Health, or SLEIGH, study is an observational study enrolling African Americans from the Sea Island communities of South Carolina and Georgia. We are enrolling patients, family members of patients, and unrelated community members. SLE is a potentially severe disease that can affect the entire body. SLE is more common in African Americans than Caucasians. The main purpose of this study is to find genes that, along with factors from the environment, result in the development of SLE. Volunteers in SLEIGH will be asked to answer questions about their health and have blood and urine collected for tests. After the first visit there may be one additional visit 2 or more years later. This is not a drug study.

Institution
MUSC
Recruitment Contact
Stephanie Slan
843-792-8997
slans@musc.edu

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